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Customer Reviews for Random House, Inc Holy Roller: Finding Redemption and the Holy Ghost in a Forgotten Texas Church

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Random House, Inc Holy Roller: Finding Redemption and the Holy Ghost in a Forgotten Texas Church

Average Customer Rating:
4.5 out of 5
4.5
 out of 
5
(4 Reviews) 4
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1 out of 1100%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for Holy Roller: Finding Redemption and the Holy Ghost in a Forgotten Texas Church
Review 1 for Holy Roller: Finding Redemption and the Holy Ghost in a Forgotten Texas Church
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Eye opening!

Date:July 13, 2012
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PaulEBear
Location:Reno, Nevada
Age:55-65
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
The story is captivating and follows a path I believe few have actually gone down. Julie's frankness and down-to-earth writing style gives the book a flavor that those outside of the black pentacostal culture would never otherwise understand.
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Review 2 for Holy Roller: Finding Redemption and the Holy Ghost in a Forgotten Texas Church
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:August 6, 2009
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Judy R Farmer
Makes me want to find this church and attend as I am in the ministry with the alcoholics and drug addicts and we have been kicked out of at least 4 churches and told not to come back. I shared this with one of my people that has been an alcoholic for 45 yrs and he wanted to come to this church also. Very well written and very informative.
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Review 3 for Holy Roller: Finding Redemption and the Holy Ghost in a Forgotten Texas Church
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:July 17, 2009
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Christy Lockstein
Holy Roller by Julie Lyons is an intriguing look at Black Pentecostal Christians by a woman who calls herself one in everything except one small factor: she's white. Lyons was working as reporter for a newspaper in Dallas when she promised her editors a story about churches in the ghetto who were claiming to heal crack users of their addiction. The story led her onto a personal journey of faith and recovery from her own sin, including that of same-sex attraction. The book tracks her membership at a small church in South Dallas through its battles with the city council, countering demons in Botswana, and seeing their community changed by the power of the Holy Spirit. Lyons' story suffers from a lack of continuity, the story didn't seem to flow smoothly, jumping from subject from chapter to chapter, and readers looking for the miracles promised on the dust jacket will be a bit disappointed because the focus is more on Lyons and her church than those who were changed by it. It's still a compelling story about how God can use the least of those to change the world. The transformation of Lyons is incredible, and her stories of demon oppression will unsettle those Christians who deny the forces of evil at work in the world. It's definitely a great read that will make readers think hard about their own faith and church.
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Review 4 for Holy Roller: Finding Redemption and the Holy Ghost in a Forgotten Texas Church
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:July 17, 2009
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Jen Quiverfullfamilycom
A self-proclaimed black Pentecostal in all ways but one, a young Julie Lyons first discovered a tiny church filled with spirit-filled believers on her beat as a crime reporter in Dallas in 1990. Following a hunch for a new angle on the escalating drug crimes and violence, she was looking for drug addicts whod been healed, delivered by God from their addictions. Working under the premise that where the spirit moves, freedom follows Lyons trolled South Dallas until she found The Body of Christ Assembly, where God was working. Shabby in appearance yet full of Gods delivering presence, it was there that Lyons and her family would make their spiritual home for the next two decades.In Holy Roller Lyons presents not only the establishment and history of The Body of Christ Assembly and her leaders, but intertwines her own spiritual growth and journey into the narrative. I expected Lyons memoirs to be filled with recounts of drug addicts being cleansed from addiction, prostitutes coming to Christ and the like. There is a certain amount of this present, but Lyons main thrust is towards giving outsiders a glimpse into the life of a black Pentecostal church.
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