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Customer Reviews for Crossway Books & Bibles Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook

Crossway Books & Bibles Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook

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Customer Reviews for Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook
Review 1 for Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

superb insights

Date:September 5, 2012
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Mark Thompson
Location:chicago, il
Age:45-54
Gender:male
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5 out of 5
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4 out of 5
another great book on various topics relating to Kingdom Work. also a must to have and share.
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Review 2 for Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Top notch resource

Date:March 12, 2012
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Darin
Age:35-44
Gender:male
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5 out of 5
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This book does an excellent job of clarifying, a mans heart for the mission of church planting. The theology was sound, and principles very applicable.
If you are considering a church plant, I would highly encourage you to read this book, and examine yourself in the light of the call you are seeking. This book has meat, and substance in a short read, and doesn't dance around the real issues of launching a church.
Worth the time.
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Review 3 for Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:December 3, 2011
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Bruce Allen
Location:Georgia
Age:55-65
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
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I have found this book to be an excellent source for anyone considering church planting. Actually, I think it is a must-read for church planters. Darrin Patrick's research, as well as, his personal experience with this subject has made him very qualified to write such an important ministry tool.
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Review 4 for Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Really Good!

Date:December 11, 2010
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jason
Location:Macon, GA
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
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I’m not a church planter. I wanted to be, but as it turns out, it isn’t what God has called me to do—at least not right now. After I found out about Darrin Patrick’s book, Church Planter, I wanted to give it a read even though I’m not planting a church. (One small caveat: I’ve been a part of two Acts 29 Network Churches and believe that church planting is thoroughly biblical and really exciting.) I had high expectations for this book and Patrick did not fail me. In fact, he exceeded my expectations and I’m glad he wrote this book. It is needed for reasons I will mention below.
The book is divided into three sections: 1) The Man, 2) The Message, 3) The Mission. Each of these sections are creatively broken down into sub-chapters and each topic very well covered. One of my first reactions to the book was the amazing artwork on the cover: VERY cool. My second observation was the plethora of footnotes throughout. I absolutely LOVE footnotes. You can never have enough footnotes…
One of my favorite things about this book is the concise yet thoroughness of the topic at hand. Patrick digs deep into theology and practice while weaving in anecdotal stories and lessons he’s learned throughout the years. The book covers a lot of deep topics and Patrick does well by not getting too bogged down in the details while still touching on the many issues therein. Concise yet informative = huge win.
The issues discussed are very timely, too. There has no doubt been a wave of church planting efforts here in the U.S., and there is a strong need for clarity. It is important to be on the ‘right’ mission with the ‘right’ message and a ‘right’ man leading the charge. Patrick clarifies what this means. He’s thoroughly biblical, passionate about culture, and excited about the future of God’s people. These elements are crucial if a church planter is going to do what God has called him to do.
Another thing I appreciated about Patrick’s book is his wisdom, humility, and reliance on Jesus. It bleeds through each and every page. The man is humble and honest about his mistakes while also being willing to demand that others do not make those same mistakes. (This is wisdom).
Last, I do not believe this book is strictly for church planters/planting. While this is Patrick’s focus (because this is what he does), every pastor could benefit from reading this book. Even if you are a pastor in a church and have been for 30+ years, you will glean a lot from Patrick’s work.
P.S. - The first paragraph on page 237 is a series of questions. Read this a few times over again. It sums up the book and will challenge you. Pray, and then get to work.
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Review 5 for Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Long overdue foundations for church planters

Date:November 2, 2010
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Pastor Rob
Location:VA
Quality: 
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THE MAN
Darrin Patrick draws his knowledge from 20 years of experience in ministry. He has walked the church planting road as founding pastor of the Journey Church in St. Louis and has the qualifications to speak on areas that make or break church planters and church plants as the vice president of the Acts 29 Church Planting Network. He makes no apology for the title of the book ruling out ½ of the population by gender and quickly reduces the number left due to a lack of maturity required to be considered a man apart from his gender. After establishing the fact that more than anatomy is needed in order for a man to be considered to lead the Lord’s church in our day, he dedicates the first 1/3 of the book to the biblical qualities needed. He begins by examining the spiritual condition of the man in question and progresses all the way through to the man’s determination to persevere in ministry no matter what the price. Quitting is not an option. Further, the man must possess a clear call into the ministry, be dependent wholly upon the Holy Spirit, possess the correct skills—gifted by the Holy Spirit—to plant/pastor a church, and be willing to lay down his life to protect the sheep that Jesus has placed in their care. While these qualities seem obvious on the surface, Patrick delves into each area in a manner that will convict even the most tenured pastors by holding up a mirror that reveals to them how they look to God in each area. Only the people with the most hardened hearts will not be convicted. The one additional area that probably should have been addressed is where the man fits in demographically (urban, suburban, rural, etc.) to ensure a good fit in the area where he is planting, or pasturing, a church.
THE MESSAGE
After covering the man in question from every possible angle, Darrin moves onto to examining the message that the man proclaims to the world. This may seem like a no-brainer but many people do not even give the message a fraction of the time that they give the marketing strategy. This creates a problem when tens of thousands of dollars are raised and spent, the crowd arrives to see what the hype is about, and then they do not even get a chance to hear the gospel. People do not need another hip self-help club to attend once a week, they need a savior and Darrin Patrick makes no apologies for this fact. He covers the message from every conceivable angle beginning with the historical reliability of what we believe, the salvation accomplishing power which must always remain centered on Jesus Christ. A message properly expounded will expose sin in the hearer’s lives and shatter the idols that they have elevated into God’s rightful place. He anticipates the fact that many people will question the truthfulness, effectiveness, sufficiency and authority of the message we preach and he addresses the objections with sound biblical support. He handles the message with reverence to the object of the message and necessity of proclaiming the message truthfully and fully. This section will cause even the long-term preachers to step back and examine the message they have been proclaiming to assure that every time they step in the pulpit they are lifting up Jesus and not themselves or their agenda.
THE MISSION
If you build it they will come may work in theory, but it makes little sense to build anything without an intended purpose. Darrin Patrick tackles the church’s mission in a manner that challenges the traditional idea of what it means to “do” church. This section is right on time, given the ease in which one can forget the big picture once they get into the heat of battle. Everyone must know what they are doing for God and keep that in focus. Further, if the church is to be a biblical church, it needs to follow the biblical mandate for why a church even exists in the first place. Just calling itself a church is not enough as Patrick reveals through the final section of the book. He asserts that the heart of mission is compassion in reaching a lost world, and addresses the biblical teaching answering the questions, what is the church and what does it look like? He covers the manner in which we can contextualize the gospel for people to understand it and gives a charge to care for the city in order to win the right to have an audience. The ultimate goal, he concludes, is city transformation whereby the city would weep if the church were no longer present. This is a radical concept in an age where many churches have turned so inward that they exist to serve and entertain the current members at the expense and exclusion of those outside the fellowship. This final section will challenge any pastor or leader to examine their church’s activity in the world based upon what the Bible teaches it should be doing and will, if considered, bring about a radical change in our communities.
In a world overflowing with books designed to help the church planter develop their methods, and strategies, Church Planter addresses the more foundational issue of whether or not the person is even a qualified person with a biblical message and mission. I highly recommend this book to anyone considering a call to plant a church as well as established church pastors. It is time that we get back to the foundation of building God’s kingdom which involves real people hearing a Christ-centered saving message from a church on mission to transform its community and this book will help all who are serious at coming alongside of God’s work.
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Review 6 for Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Great Resource for Anyone Involved in the Kingdom

Date:October 22, 2010
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Khua
Location:San Jose, CA
Age:18-24
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
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Mark Driscoll addresses it well in his forward to the book: Darrin Patrick is a “pastor to pastors.” Darrin Patrick is the Vice-President of the Acts 29, one of the most highly innovative yet theologically-faithful church planting networks today. Often time, pastors and other ministry leaders find themselves alone in leading their congregations and ministries, and it is very hard to receive the feedback and support that Patrick has been able to provide his fellow pastors as they fulfill their callings.
Patrick writes a great new book about church planting. I knew once I saw the endorsements on this book that I had to pick it up and take a look for myself. While I am not a pastor or church planter, I am a former parachurch worker and I have been praying over God’s direction and call on my life. My desire to was to pick up this book and perhaps gain a better perspective of what it might look like to plant a church and start a new ministry.
What I found was much more than that—it isn’t so much a book about “church planting” as much as it is a book about what a faithful ministry is and what is clear, convicting gospel preaching. What I appreciate about Patrick’s writing is that he takes you one step further and also talks you through some of the commonly made mistakes and misconceptions that occur between gospel preaching and cultural engagement.
The book is split into three sections: The Man, The Message, and The Mission. Personally, I found the last two sections to be immensely better than the first. Not that the first didn’t have good content, but I would guess the last two sections are immensely helpful to ANYONE involved in ministry (and that should be all of us). It is very clear that Darrin Patrick has been very influenced by the ministry of Tim Keller, especially in the areas of preaching the gospel to the heart (idolatry) as well as proper cultural engagement (contextualization). As a follower of Keller’s ministry myself, I am very excited that a resource has been put out that has consolidated much of the principles of his ministry into a very readable and practical form.
There’s a story at the end of the second to last chapter that makes me tear up every time I read it about a life being changed through encountering Jesus. Just wanted to mention it so you all would pay special attention to it.
I highly recommend this book to not just church planters, but anyone involved in ministry. It will help you proclaim the life-changing truth of the gospel to everyone around you, and this is a resource I will come back to time and time again.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the Crossway book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255 <[...]> : "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
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Review 7 for Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great resource for planters and pastors

Date:October 17, 2010
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Todd
Location:Oklahoma City, OK
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
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Church Planter by Darrin Patrick is a must read for anyone wanting to plant a church or to be involved in full-time ministry. Patrick teaches the reading what the man leading God’s church should look like, what his message should be, and finally what the mission of the church should be. The book is geared towards those involved in planting, but as one serving in a more traditional and established church I gained much from it and I believe you will as well. So go to your local bookstore or get on the internet and get this book now. It will change your life!
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Review 8 for Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A Challenging and Critical Read

Date:October 8, 2010
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Bentley Crawford
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
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If you are looking for a book that clearly and concisely describes what is required of men who would be a pastor or church planter, what the central message this man and church proclaims should be, and how he and the church he leads should love one another and function in their city then this new book by Darrin Patrick is a pretty good choice.
The book is Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission and was published by Crossway Books. Patrick is a pastor at The Journey in St. Louis and is also a vice president of the Acts 29 Church Planting Network.
Now, not being a pastor or church planter myself, I am obviously nothing more than a christian who cares about these issues and desires to think about them more biblically and see others think about them more biblically as well.
Preliminary Observations:
As I like to do with all books I read, I try to make preliminary observations about the book to help me get context as I read it. Speaking in terms of design and graphics quality I have really enjoyed the books Crossway has been putting out lately. This book is no exception. It has a great look and an awesome picture on the front. Though I was initially turned off by the cover as possibly over-glorifying a pastor or church planter as this lone saver of souls. The back of the book is also very helpful with a long list of respected evangelical leaders and thinkers giving glowing endorsements for this book.
The book is only 240 pages long and is very accessible in terms of length and writing style.
Surveying the table of contents really helps make clear what the book will be about. And it covers a wide range of topics very well and very coherently. The book is divided into three main sections: The Man, The Message, and the Mission, with Mark Driscoll writing the forward.
The Man:
In the first section “The Man,” chapters include:
-A Rescued Man
-A Called Man
-A Qualified Man
-A Dependent Man
-A Skilled Man
-A Shepherding Man
-A Determined Man.
I thought this was quite an impressive survey of what is needed and required of a pastor/church planter. I found Patrick’s writing to be both admonishing and warning toward those lacking in these areas as well as encouraging and shepherding toward the same people. Helping one to evaluate their calling and gifting and ask the hard questions about themselves, while not leaving them hopeless and despairing.
Starting with the most basic and essential requirement is that a man be truly saved before he be a pastor/church planter. This may seem obvious and unneeded until we realize that many churches could be being led by men who are actually not saved themselves.
The chapters on calling and qualification were especially helpful in helping potential church planters or pastors evaluate their calling and if they meet biblical qualifications. They weren’t just helpful on a practical level, but Patrick was pointing us back to the biblical criteria for elders. The office shouldn’t be reserved for the best communicators or committed members, but for men whom God has gifted and is calling. I also think it would be helpful for churches to have these things as their criteria when thinking through who their elders or pastors should be. These issues can seem so nitpicky and unimportant until we realize that it is God who gives elders to the church. It is the potential elder’s and the churches responsibility to take the qualifications in 1 & 2 Timothy and Titus seriously.
The final four chapters in this section were equally helpful in equipping men to think through what the real life of a pastor/church planter might look like and what will be essential in their lives.
The Message:
I also found the second section titled: “The Message” clear and instructional as well:
-A Historical Message
-Salvation-Accomplishing
-Christ-Centered
-Sin-Exposing
-Idol Shattering.
Each of these chapters were packed with great teaching on the objective reality and power as well as the every day experience of the gospel. Nothing is more essential and critical than the message of the gospel. Getting the gospel right and applying it to our lives is the first and most foundational point from which the rest of the points made in this book should flow.
The Mission:
The final section zeroed in on “The Mission”:
-The Heart of Mission: Compassion
-The House of Mission: The Church
-The How of Mission: Contextualization
-The Hands of Mission: Care
-The Hope of Mission: City Transformation.
This could possibly be the most controversial section among the reformed camp. With characteristic Acts 29 emphases on “missional” themes such as “contextualization” and “city transformation” are possible points of tension. Though some may not be thoroughly convinced of Patrick’s positions I felt that he did a great job of clarifying his positions and striking what to my mind seems like a biblical balance.
Conclusion:
I was struck by how comprehensive this book was in so small an amount of pages. Patrick extensively covered a range of issues that are so important. It truly is as Dave Harvey says on the back of the book: “a boot-camp-in-print.”
If I had hoped to see anything that wasn’t thoroughly mentioned it would be a treatment of the gifts God gives to each of His people to build His body. It seems it would be helpful for a pastor/church planter to not only see his role as one that God has gifted him for but also to have a healthy grasp of how he is but one part in the whole of the varied parts of the body. And building a healthy “every member functioning properly” perspective into his church could only help further church health and mission.
Even if you don’t agree with everything in the book it seems that almost everyone thinking of seeking the position of pastor or church planter should read this book and be forced to wrestle with what is found here.
Who Should Read It:
Overall I found this to be a very helpful book covering a host of topics that should be one of the top books any of the following should read:
1. an aspiring pastor/church planter,
2. an existing pastor/church planter who hasn’t really received much instruction in these areas, and finally
3. church members and leadership searching for elders or pastors.
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Review 9 for Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 30, 2010
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Jon Wymer
I just spent the past couple of weeks reading Church Planter by Darrin Patrick. The word spent is no joke, and a good investment it was. Some readers may find Patricks title contradicts his content. This isnt really one more church planting book: it serves as a manual for what it means to be a pastor-elder or a minister of the gospel. In other words, this is a book for pastors of all stripes.Patrick builds his picture of ministry using three categories: man, message, mission. I felt the book had already paid for itself by the time I finished the man section. My prediction is that this book may become a seminary textbook, largely for the value of this first portion. Patrick explains with accessible illustrations and solid Scriptural foundation the biblical requirements of an elder, ministry calling, and triperspectivalism just for starters.I dont think the remaining two sections of this book were as impact-ridden for me as the first portion. Let me tell you a little about them. The message portion explains what it means to be gospel-centered and provides a basic primer in how the gospel relates to the idolatry of our hearts. In his mission section, Patrick builds a case for missional church, contextualization, and mercy ministry. Perhaps because I have been so focused on these areas in the recent past, I find the back 2/3 of this book to be competent biblical primers. This brings me back to the idea that Patricks book is a readable, biblical introduction to ministry and would serve as an excellent seminary textbook.....not a complete review....I received this book free from Crossway Books. Feel free to drop by CrossRooted (dot) com for complete review.
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Review 10 for Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 15, 2010
'Church planting' has come to be somewhat of a buzz word within various denominations and networks. Various models and paradigms of ministry are espoused, critiqued, implemented, succeed and fail. Patrick's book calls the church planter back to the basics of what is involved and provides a thorough biblical foundation for the type of man called to plant a church, the message of the gospel that is to be proclaimed and the mission of the church as it proclaims the message of the gospel in it's city.I am not a church planter, but found this book extremely insightful to me as a pastor. The work uses scripture throughout to establish the main points of each section, as illustrations to points, and as general encouragement. In addition to a solid scriptural basis, Patrick incorporates a wide selection of quotes throughout the book from early church fathers to pastors of our day.One of the most helpful parts of the book are the very penetrating questions in the beginning chapters for a church planter. These questions examine the call of a church planter and delve into the character and gifting he has (or doesn't have). I found these questions to be valuable not only for a church planter, but for every pastor to examine his call afresh. As I disciple others who have expressed a call to ministry, I will use many of the questions in this work to guide future church planters and pastors.If I could summarize this book in a succinct way it might be as follows: The Man, the Message, and the Mission of church planting/the church is Jesus. While the man called of God to plant/pastor, the message of the gospel he proclaims and the mission of the church plant to reach it's city have responsibilities and practical decisions to make, the man is simply a man (with a call from God) proclaiming a message with a mission. The Man, the Message, and the Mission of church planting/the church is Jesus.
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Review 11 for Church Planter: The Man, the Message, the Mission - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 13, 2010
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Jacob Young
At the center of this book beats a heat centered on Jesus Christ and him crucified. This got me excited about the book. Darrin Patrick is a pastor, a pastor who loves Jesus, and you get the sense through the book that Patrick wants us to know the power of King Jesus as it relates to the call of some to plant churches. He wants what God wants, what the Bible clearly calls men to: men who know the power of Christ to rescue them from sin and call them into a life with God.Three sections make the book worth it's price in gold: Page 25 of the book where he talks about What does it mean to be rescued?; chapter three, with a helpful exposition of 1 Timothy 3s qualifications of a pastor; and page 124 where Patrick goes through and gives an extensive Scripture listing of The blessings that Christ has procured or us through his death and resurrection [that are] immeasurable. A further helpful aspect of the book that I would note is Patrick's pastoral care for us through the material. He likes to ask you lots of questions to help you think through things. He also wants to keep you from going off on bad roads from various things he presents. So very often he presents biblical truth, applies it to your life, and then gives observations (typically two or three) on how people can avoid this truth, supress it, take it the wrong way, etc. His wise insight will be helpful in guiding many men on a godly path of pursuing a church planting calling.In this book, Patrick exemplifies that which is greatly needed and for which Acts 29 is to be deeply thanked: He sticks to the Gospel and let's the power of Jesus Christ be the engine by which church planting runs. In this respect, I think this book will prove to be invaluable to any church planter.Im certain that this book will become a standard in the years to come for men thinking about or in the process of church planting.[From: http://lloydjones.wordpress.com/]
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