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Customer Reviews for IVP Books Everyday Justice: The Global Impact of Our Daily Choices - eBook

IVP Books Everyday Justice: The Global Impact of Our Daily Choices - eBook

Giving us a tour of our everyday, and un-thought-out, choices, Julie Clawson argues in her book Everyday Justice that many of the consumer products we buy are ridden with moral injustices. From your daily cup of coffee, to produce, to credit cards, to sweaters, every purchase we make has a moral implication. That's the bad news. The good news is that if we educate ourselves, we can make a difference, and everyone else can make a profit, not just the lucky ones.
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Customer Reviews for Everyday Justice: The Global Impact of Our Daily Choices - eBook
Review 1 for Everyday Justice: The Global Impact of Our Daily Choices - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:March 10, 2010
This book is for folks who are interested in finding simple ways to make changes for a more just world. There are seven topics discussed in the book. Each chapter presents a topic, suggests real solutions for justice and includes resources such as websites, documentaries and books to study the subject further. Highly recommended! (Micah 6:8)
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Review 2 for Everyday Justice: The Global Impact of Our Daily Choices - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:October 8, 2009
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Sarah Notton
Everyone will be talking about the one thing that no one (other than Julie) is talking about - disposable diapers/feminine products. It's kind of icky, but kudos to Julie for bringing it up. This is another one where we are encouraged to make the best choice given your situation. For instance, sometimes you are required to use disposable products (such as in daycares or nurseries), but you can still try to reduce consumption in other areas. A friend reminded me that in the film "Little Women", in pretty much every scene you could see the girls folding white cloths. In a house full of women...well, let's just say they weren't dish towels. If you aren't sure what to do without disposables, ask your mother, grandmother, or I'm guessing the majority of women in the world today. Thanks to the discussion of this topic in Everyday Justice, I went looking for what women in the developing world use for "sustainable" pads - and unfortunately, the options aren't good. The "homespun" options include rags, bark, and mud...and if rags are an option, many women don't have access to water to clean them. Without access to appropriate sanitary protection, women may miss up to 50 days a year of work or school, which leads to inequity in income and education. Perhaps my take-away from this discussion will be to attempt to reduce consumption and to find a more ethical option than what I use now, but to also advocate for women who don't have the options that I do as a woman in the US.Some of the suggestions offered in the book seem radical, but nothing seems to be suggested without good reason. Living sustainably in a way that cares for other people (our neighbor) and God's creation isn't necessarily as convenient as living as a blissfully unaware consumer. However, if the Bible can be believed as true (and I think that most of the audience for this book would agree that it can), then "everyday justice" becomes an avenue for "everyday worship".
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