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Customer Reviews for Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. The Book of Revelation: New International Greek Testament Commentary [NIGTC]

Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co. The Book of Revelation: New International Greek Testament Commentary [NIGTC]

This volume on Revelation is accessible and comprehensive. It provides an in-depth look at the parallels between images in the Apocalypse and their Old Testament and Jewish antecedentsG.K. Beale's painstaking anaylsis will help you better understand the obscure metaphors in Revelation and the purpose of the book itself.
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Customer Reviews for The Book of Revelation: New International Greek Testament Commentary [NIGTC]
Review 1 for The Book of Revelation: New International Greek Testament Commentary [NIGTC]
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:March 19, 2008
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Martin Parra
Its 1245 pages, not 1048! Have endurance then you can read it. You cannot avoid to give himfive stars. A scholastic work in my favorite series of the NT. On Daniel he is perfect in his exegesis, but the Hebrew and Aramaic is missing. But in Greek he is outstanding. It isin small print and with thin pages. In Germanyit would have been published in three or fourvolumes with an exaggerated price. Be luckythat it is published in US. His outlook is toexplain the Book of Revelation along the OldTestament, the Jewish apocrypha and Jewish exegesis which he quotes in detail. His keywordis semaino in Rev 1,1 on which he lays the foundations of his exegesis. It is a very exceptional approach but very commendable.
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Review 2 for The Book of Revelation: New International Greek Testament Commentary [NIGTC]
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 4, 2007
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Timothy Beck
An excellent reference book and a must have for the serious student or teacher. With approximately 30 pages of references listed at the beginning of the book, the text studies all angles of the issues, but still draws conclusions based on the extant evidence. Current, relevant, and recommended.
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Review 3 for The Book of Revelation: New International Greek Testament Commentary [NIGTC]
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:March 3, 2007
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David Bielby
I pastor a church about 2 hours from Wheaton College where Beale currently teaches. I audited his Spring 2006 course on Revelation in Greek. I have to say that the man is on fire for God's word. He's got a contagious zeal for the book of Revelation. We had a Greek student (from Greece) in class and visitors from Greece. Apparently they like him a lot.His exegetical method weighs heavily on a unique approach that includes a relatively rare Discourse Analysis process that Wheaton and about 6 other schools now teach in their Biblical Interpretations Courses. I think someone at Fuller developed it. The Discourse Analysis process is a nice addition to the regular NT Exegesis that Gordon Fee has outlined for everyone in "NT Exegesis". It seems to help the students catch the flow of the text and to connect ideas in a more complex and systematic way than a regular flow analysis.The linkages to the OT Prophetic books are overwhelming. Beale literally drips with quotations...his live course is about the same as the book. Just compare the quotes on one of his pages to any other commentary and you get way more for your money with Beale.If you are preaching through Revelation, get Beale and Poythress (The Returning King). I recommend Poythress' outline for a sermon series...and Beale for more exegetical tips and references than you could possibly study for a typical sermon in a week. If you don't know Greek, then Poythress will really help you. His outlines preach well. My main criticism of Beale's work is that his Exegetical Summaries for each section sound very much like a summary that a scholar who does not have to speak to regular folks very often would give. It's not preachable...you will have to rework it to keep people with you if you are preaching. That's why Poythress is great...he gives preachable phrases that harmonize well with Beale's material. The criticism about not dealing with preterist view is covered in his introduction. Five Star book!!
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Review 4 for The Book of Revelation: New International Greek Testament Commentary [NIGTC]
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:December 27, 2000
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Steve Debenport
This is the best commentary on Revelation that I've come across. Beale's in-depth descriptions of historical and grammatical issues were extremely helpful. I strongly recommend this book when building your reference library.
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Review 5 for The Book of Revelation: New International Greek Testament Commentary [NIGTC]
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:August 9, 2000
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Randy Rogers
Beale's work is a major contribution to the study of the use of the Old Testament in John's Revelation. His book is not designed to explain the "end of the world," but instead he gives full thought to how John read and used the Old Testament. Beale's work shows the continuity of the last book of the Bible with the rest of scripture, and also sheds some new light on the thought and genius of John the Revelatorm as a biblical interpreter. The book itself is quite big and full of technical information. It makes a better reference tool than a general reader. Still, Beale adds in-depth analysis and theological conclusions which would benefit any preacher or serious student of Revelation.
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Review 6 for The Book of Revelation: New International Greek Testament Commentary [NIGTC]
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:July 2, 2000
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Rick Aguirre
Gregory Beale's work is without question a monumental commentary on Revelation. It should remain a landmark on Revelation studies to come. Written from a conservative standpoint Beale wrestles with the texts in a sober fashion. Not all of his conclusions are convincing and he hardly deals with a major hermeneutic of Revelation, namely the preterist view. If the reader can overlook these flaws this book is highly recommended for serious study.
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