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Customer Reviews for Thomas Nelson The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)

Thomas Nelson The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)

Most of us remember Scott Hamilton as the 1984 Winter Olympics Gold-Medal men's figure skater. He's also a cancer survivor, and a Christian. In The Great Eight Hamilton outlines eight key principles that have helped him keep a positive attitude, and turn his failures into triumphs. You'll be inspired by his story and encouraged to practice Hamilton's "figure eight" in your own life.
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Customer Reviews for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Review 1 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A WONDERFUL READ!!!

Date:April 14, 2014
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IAmANobody
Location:Texas
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Adopted at birth, Scott Hamilton lost both of his adopted parents at a young age. Then at the height of his success he lost his job, his career, and went through cancer twice. You would think Hamilton would have every reason to be angry at God and live his entire existence as a miserable person. But he's not miserable, and he's not angry at God. If anything, Scott Hamilton loves God, and lets the reader know in this book. A wonderful read!!!
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Review 2 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:August 5, 2009
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Craig McDole
As a member of the Thomas Nelson Book Review Blogger program, I have once again had the opportunity to read a high-quality book by one of my favorite people. In this book, Scott Hamilton keys in on the eight practices he has used to be happy in life, on and off of the ice. Most would remember Scott as the Olympic ice skater, or the enthusiastic ice skating announcer on TV. But, most wouldn't remember any of the trials he has faced in life.In this book, Scott goes into detail about his battles with cancer, brain tumors, and disease, while still keeping front and foremost...happy. His upbeat and positive characteristics can do nothing but inspire a person to be more happy about whatever circumstances you may face. Scott uses one of the most well-known skating moves, the figure 8 (thus the title), as his focus on being happy. The eight chapters focus on different techniques you can use to keep yourself upbeat and your eyes on the prize. Scott's faith shows forth throughout the book and is sure to touch your heart.This book is a must-read and a hard book to set down once opened. I recommend it for everyone, especially if you are going through trials that seem to overwhelm you...great book!
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Review 3 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Date:May 26, 2009
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aimforperfection
In The Great Eight, internationally renowned figure skater Scott Hamilton, with the assistance of Ken Baker, describes eight secrets that have helped him maintain faith and optimism from the highs of Olympic championship to the lows of cancer. Despite astounding success in his figure skating career, Scott struggled many years to apply his on-ice success principles to his personal life. Inspired by repetitive practice of the compulsory figure 8, Scott illustrates eight points that taught him to be responsible for his own happiness. The Great Eight inspires readers to follow these principles, to take charge of their circumstances and commit to goals, so they too may find lasting happiness.Scott does offer some sage advice. He reminds us that we will not find true happiness until we accept our God-given flaws. How we deal with our experiences defines our character. We can choose to let life smother us, or we can choose to let our experiences enhance our lives and provide opportunity for growth. Scotts strategy for happiness is valid and applicable, but the book itself is a bit redundant and doesnt flow chronologically.
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Review 4 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Date:May 24, 2009
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Lana
I'm a Thomas Nelson Book Review Blogger and chose this book for my first review. I love ice skating and have loved watching Scott Hamilton skate for years, so I was really excited to see that I could choose a book that he has written and was anxious to dig in and read!In the book, Scott tells of the challenges he faced as a child and and as an adult and how he has remained to be happy even though his circumstances haven't always been ideal. Though he was a very sickly child, Scott tells how ice skating helped him build his confidence and helped his health in a miraculous way. He learned discipline through his training partly by skating figure 8's over and over as this builds the foundational skills for ice skaters. The practicing of this technique is what he attributes to winning his Olympic gold metal as well as the basis for the title of his book.He also describes his challenges as an adult with being terminated from Ice Capades and getting cancer. Though he has faced several life-altering challenges, he has remained positive and describes 8 ways in which he maintains his superior attitude. He gives examples how he has applied these techniques throughout his own life as well as using examples from other skaters.Though I highly respect Scott Hamilton and all he has been through, I thought this book was a bit superficial. I believe the book seems to be marketed as a self-help book and I would NOT recommend it as such. I'm glad his strategies of remaining positive and smiling even though the circumstances may be difficult work for him, but it seems like he tends to gloss over and simplify many of the events as well as how he managed each of them. For me, what I thought would be an exciting book that I was really looking forward to, turned out to be a book in which I was disappointed and won't be recommending very often.
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Review 5 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:May 16, 2009
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Julieanne Miller
Scott Hamilton's recently published book, The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (even when you have every reason to be miserable), (January 2009), is a light and entertaining read on Scott's own life...from nearly dying from a childhood illness to two bouts with cancer, plus the highs and lows of being a part of the international ice skating community. Youll read about Scotts struggles, his triumphs, and his wonderful laughs through different years of his life; youll read about the people who have made the most impact on him as a person, a skater, and a Christian. The Great Eight doesnt come across as a deeply profound theological work, but the issues that Scott addresses are deep and will touch your life. We all have struggles with who we are, how we fit into our community and society, and whether or not we will honor our Creator. As someone who has followed ice skating for years, since childhood, and has always enjoyed watching Scott Hamilton on the ice, I found this a curious peek into his life and how he has survived physical struggles, misconceptions about who he is as a person, and his more recent walk in faith as a follower of Jesus Christ. If you enjoy ice skating and have been curious about Scott Hamilton on and off the ice this will be a book youll enjoy reading. I am a member of Thomas Nelson's Book Review Blogger program at http://brb.thomasnelson.com
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Review 6 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:May 15, 2009
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TerryAnn
I received this book several months ago. I grew up watching Scott Hamilton dance on ice and wanting to do that myself. He made it look so easy. Then, regrettably, I decided to use my pilits license. You know, I pile it here and then pile it there. It got lost in one of the piles.I pulled it out this week and read through it very quickly. I enjoyed the story of why he started skating, his battles with cancers and his love for life.Life was not always the smiling face we saw during the Olympics and Ice Capades. Health issues, relationship problems, miscommunications. But he persevered. Learn how he faced lifes challenges and chose to be happy. Yes, happiness is a choice. Every day of your life, something or someone is going to throw something at you that will challenge your ability to rise above negativity. It isnt the events in your life that define you; its how you deal with them. (pg 91,92) I found this book to be enjoyable, a fast read and very encouraging.
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Review 7 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:April 21, 2009
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Jarrod Spencer
There is not a person that I've ever met that could use more optimism. In a world of recession, divorce, & Depression, optimism is always needed."The Great 8", by Olympic champion, Scott Hamilton, is a book dedicated to helping its readers become optimistic. Naturally, he uses skating as a method to explain how to be happy, when it seems like it may be impossible.I enjoyed the use of figure skating examples and illustrations to help me understand the message Scott was trying to convey. I learned things I didn't know before about figure skating (like why it was called figure skating).Scott makes great points that should help anyone achieve the goal of becoming more optimistic. For example, you've got to get up even when you've fallen, trust the one who is coaching you, learn through losing, clear your mind, be positive, smile, go last, get out of your rut, and stand in the spotlight.One critique I would have about the book, is that it seemed there were times that the information about Scott's cancer seemed a bit repetitive.Overall, I would recommend this book to anyone looking to have a better outlook on life. It was an easy read but was very enjoyable at the same time.
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Review 8 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:April 13, 2009
The Great Eight is a book of a journey, a journey to happiness, but ultimately a journey to God, the Almighty Coach as Scott calls Him. A sickly child, to the point of death, not growing and developing, in and out of hospitals, with no diagnosis, and sent home to just be, Scott was re-introduced to skating, and it became a 'cure' for his illnesses. This book will take you through Scott's life as he searches for the right coaches in his career, as he searches for answers to his problems and as he battles illnesses and as he finds happiness. It is a journey of life that Scott takes, bringing him to the conclusion that happiness is unique to you, that nothing can match the happiness of doing something you love. Also you will find out that coincidences are just God scheduled opportunities, and learning to accept that will brighten your outlook and infuse you with a greater sense or purpose, direction and confidence. This was a wonderful story of Scott's life and discovery, I did find it a bit confusing, in how he often jumped from his early years of training, to his later years of illnesses, but all in all it was a great book and I give it a 4 star rating.
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Review 9 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:April 6, 2009
The Great Eight este genul de carte motivationala care puncteaza opt cai de fi fericit cu lucurile prin care treci. Pe scurt poti parcurge etape din viata unui om carea gusta celebritatea, care s-a bucurat de faima si de bani si care este lovit de surpiza numita cancer. Mi-am dat seama din nou cat de mare este ajutorul pe care il poate da o persoana care trece prin dificultati altor semeni framanati la radnul lor de nevoi, probleme si tot felul de ganduri; si spun asta comparand vorbele mele pe are as putea sa I le spun unui suferind. Cel care sufera sau a suferit este mai eficient in sfaturile sale cum sa treci peste sau prin perioada dificila din viata. Si este interesant ca aceasta pshiologie simpla o prezinta si Biblia cand apostolul Pavel spune Corintenilor Desigur, modalitatea in care Scott Hamilton isi expune experienta sa il califica pentru pozitia de ajutor/suport binevenit in situatii dezastruoase. Construndu-si o cariera in patinaj artistic, intra in proiectul vietii sale un element numit cancer; izbindu-se de probleme personale si cunoscand limitari, Scott a refuzat sa se considere un infrant. In cartea sa The Great Eight - How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to be Miserable) Hamilton impartaseste citirotului cele opt puncte care l-au condus spre eliberare si bucurie desi ar fi avut toate conditiile/motivele sa se simta captiv si dezgustat de ceea ce viata i-a pus inainte. Folosind un limbaj simplu, transapsrent, Scott este in unele pasaje atat de aproape de inima celui incercat in dreptul sau incat ii simti respiratia.detalii http://blog.punctul.com/2009/04/07/fericirea-in-opt-puncte-cum-sa-te-bucuri-si-cand-nu-ai-motive/
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Review 10 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:April 1, 2009
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Kelly
The Great Eight is Scott Hamilton at his best as he uses the familiar figure eight into a symbol of eight steps to happiness. The skating fan will not be disappointed as Scott waves familiar and some unfamiliar biographical skating stories throughout the book. It is from these experiences that Hamilton created his eight steps to finding happiness.What makes this book a good read is, of course, the voice and wit of Scott Hamilton that takes the reader from the pinnacle of a gold medal champion to being both a cancer and a brain tumor survivor. Scott teaches the reader the handle the ups and downs of life with grace, humor, and faith, qualities not always able to be produced by Scott himself. As each chapter presents a step to happiness, the reader hears not only the familiar Scott the skater, but also Scott the philosopher and most surprisingly, Scott the Christian. If The Great Eight does not lead you to the secrets of happiness, it will at least leave you with a smile just look at Scott on the cover!
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Review 11 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:March 29, 2009
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LaTanya
I really enjoyed reading Scott Hamilton's book "The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (even when you have every reason to be miserable)". I have always been a fan of Scott Hamilton's skating and I was really excited to learn more about his life. While the book is not an autobiography, Scott does talk about his life experiences. He has had many rough times in his life, but he has chosen to be happy. He lists 8 lessons (or keys) that he has learned to be really happy. In each lesson he includes many examples of his life and also how you can apply the lesson to your life. Since Scott is a figure skater, each lesson uses skating as an example. While each lesson does seem like it would be common sense, when you really think about it, you wonder why have I not been doing this?What I really liked most about this book is that we will ALL face difficult times in our lives and it is how we deal with it that will impact us the most. We can either learn to be happy (in spite of the difficult circumstances) or allow the difficult times to rule (and ruin) our lives.This was a really great book and I know I will be reading it again through out the years.
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Review 12 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:March 13, 2009
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Donni Buchanan
In this book Scott shares with us stories of his life and skating career. Many of the people who have influenced his life have given him words of wisdon which he passes on to us. Some of these are practical experience words and some are words of faith from other Christians. The style of writing is easy and you may feel like you're listening to a friend who's sharing with you some of what he's been through. This is not a deep theological read and is not meant to be. This is more a" this-is-what-I've-done-and-this-is-where-I-am" kind of book. I enjoyed The Great Eight very much. Scott Hamilton has always been one of my favorite skaters and now I get to know more about his life. Scott has been through cancer and other health problems, but when he came to Christ and began to see things from God's perspective, he found there is a way to be happy even in the middle of difficulties. I think my favorite bit of advice he shares is "keep the ice clear." This is about communicating with the people in your life and yet being true to yourself. This book is an easy read that I think you will enjoy. If you would like to know more about skating, Scott's life and how he thinks, I definitely would recommend the book. Enjoy!
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Review 13 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:March 12, 2009
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momtotheincredibles
Scott Hamilton's book shows us incredibly talented figure skaters search for happiness just as you and I do. Scott struggled with depression, guilt, trying to be perfect, cancer, loss and so much more-just like you and I.As you read this book, you feel as if Scott is in the room with you, just having a conversation. He brings many analogies from the skating world into Christianity, even calling God, his "Almighty Coach". He also talks about the disappointments and trials in his life. Scott tells us in looking back, he sees how God was in control of his life all along.Did you know that for most of Scott's childhood hospital visits, medical tests, and foul-tasting medicines were the norm? A simple suggestion by the family doctor led him to skating lessons where he grew healthy and strong. Scott has battled cancer twice. He did not let the trauma of surgery, chemo, or radiation crush his spirit. Scott was born on August 28, 1958 and he has always considered "8" his lucky number. How ironic that it was his figure eights that really won him the gold medal in 1984! He says, "It takes years of dedication and practice for a skater to create a perfect figure eight, and it's no different in one's pursuit of happiness." Today people think we have to work more, make more money, live in a big house to be happy. Scott shows that happiness is more than what you own.His eight rules for being happy are the eight chapters of the book. Each one was filled with anecdotes and lessons learned. The chapters show how he dealt with and conquered his problems.If you have ever watched Scott Hamilton perform his trademark backflip on the ice, if you have ever enjoyed his sports commentaries during the Olympics, or just loved watched him skate to crazy routines, you will enjoy this book. If you just need a pick-me-up from someone who has been where you are, you will enjoy this book
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Review 14 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:February 23, 2009
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Tiffany Colter
I just finished reading The Great Eight. What I really liked about this book is Scott not only gives realistic advice, but he is also very open with the way he changed figure skating. I wondered if the skating analogies would get lame after a while, but they really didn't. In fact, I'm taking the unusual step of encouraging your to read the introduction. This truly inspired me.As I read the 8 life principles I felt like he was sitting next to me on the couch chatting with me. I recognized the kind of unique thinking that kept him in the spotlight when many other skaters have faded away. His principles can be applied to any life. But it wasn't all happy. Scott was clear that he has made a number of mistakes both professionally and personally. While he doesn't delve in to them in a way that would make this just another hardcover tabloid, he gives the reader enough information to learn from his mistakes.The Bad: I wish I could say I love everything about this book, but there were a few issues for me. Primarily early on I saw some very weak writing and editing. My concern is that some of these early issues [nearly all in the first 80 pages] would turn a reader off and cause them to miss the wisdom I discovered in the balance of the book.Also, there were a few spots where he slipped in to preachiness. I gave him some wiggle room, however, because I think this was a result of his passion for these topics. I NEVER felt I was being preached at, rather I felt he was a good friend who was so concerned for me that he was nearly begging me to listen.Recommendation: When it comes to autobiographies this is one of only two that I've ever urged a family member to read. I recommend this book in the strongest possible terms.
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Review 15 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:February 19, 2009
I enjoyed the book, The Great Eight. Scott Hamilton combines stories from his life, his Christian testimony, figure skating analogies, and several worthwhile life lessons with his unique sense of humor, honesty, and common sense to make many good points. The tone of the book was upbeat, positive, and mostly light-hearted, yet demanded I get out my highlighter to mark significant quotes and my pen for scribbling my own thoughts in the margins. I didnt expect that, but was pleasantly surprised.Though Hamilton has had tremendous success in the figure skating world, he has also overcome many life hardships: a mysterious childhood illness, loss of loved ones at an early age, cancer, a brain tumor, and going bald. (That was Art Linkletters joke, not mine.) Yet Hamilton has learned how to choose happiness through hard times. The subtitle says it well: How to Be Happy (even when you have every reason to be miserable)". The eight chapters are eight principles to practiceand if you look closely within each chapter, youll find many more. My favorite thoughts were When you fall, get back up and Smile like Kristi Yamaguchi. His chapter on keeping the ice clear was absolutely profound. They are simple thoughts, simply said, but worth deep consideration in the pursuit of a happy life.
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Review 16 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Date:February 17, 2009
Boy, this is a tough one. I recently finished reading this book finally. I love figure skating, and I really enjoy Scott Hamilton as a performer, so I figured that I would love this book. It truly pains me to say this, but I didnt. I found I had to force myself to finish it. The book is about Scotts journey and the many difficulties hes been through, and truly, he has overcome a lot of obstacles throughout his life. Hes dealt with a childhood illness that nearly killed him, testicular cancer and a brain tumor, to name a few. It focuses on maintaining happiness despite our circumstances and there are many fantastic nuggets of truth and encouragement contained in it. However For me, it was not an easy read. It seemed repetitive and went in circles a lot. And maybe that was deliberate, because he stresses the importance of being able to do a great figure eight, to be able to do the perfect circle over and over. Unfortunately, it just didnt hold my interest. It does provide a positive message, and certainly Scott Hamilton is an inspiration. He offers us his Great Eight steps to being happy and shares some wonderful words of wisdom. But honestly, I think it could have been done in about a quarter of the pages. Though I wasnt thrilled with the book, I still admire Scott and his achievements. As much as Id like to, I just cant recommend this book.
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Review 17 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:February 9, 2009
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Laura N
I have a love/hate relationship with celebrity self-help books and with lists of great ways to transform your life. I opted for this book because it promised to share more about Scott Hamilton's life and the world of skating. I must admit, every 4 years I become a huge fan of ice skating. I also love to see what works for other people and wonder how they take the mess that is real life and get it to fit into a nice little round number like 8.In the introduction, as he is describing his brain cancer diagnosis and treatment, he describes the lesson he quickly learned this way: "Facing death yet again, I realized I was no longer living to win. Rather, I was living to not lose." (p xix) The rest of the book is this same practical and honest voice. He presents good advice, with good examples of how he learned the lesson and why each is an important step in being happy. He doesn't mean a sappy, gooey happy. He aims for a real contentment and joy in life. His Christian message is present and incorporated in a very meaningful way. This is not a gospel tract, but a real story about real life and what has been important in his journey.I enjoyed this book. It was great way to learn more about the man and his world view. It was also a good Christian book discussing some practical points for working on ourselves to be happy, while not ignoring the fact that a faith in God is a requirement.
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Review 18 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:February 8, 2009
Scott Hamilton's favorite number is eight. Eight has played an important part of his entire life. First as his birthdate: 8-28-58; then as a figure skater, he had to learn discipline and control to perfectly skate a figure eight; and now he uses eight as part of the title in his biography which has eight principles for a happy life.Scott contends that "even when you have every reason to be miserable," you can be happy. After spending a good bit of his childhood as a sickly boy, Scott discovered that ice skating made him feel free. He calls God his Almighty Coach, and he gives credit to Christ for the ability to find happiness in spite of suffering. Scott suffered from testicular cancer and then from a brain tumor. He cites many other examples in his life that would pull some people down into the depths of despair, but because of his take on life, Scott Hamilton remains a happy man.This is an interesting book to read about an interesting celebrity. I recommend it.
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Review 19 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

Date:January 27, 2009
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Chris
I just finished The Great Eight by Scott Hamilton This book is a combination of biography and self-help. Hamilton, along with his co-author, mixes the two genres so that the events of his life serve as examples for the eight principles that he tries to communicate throughout the book. From the first page to the last, Hamilton preaches the gospel of happiness. It almost seems as if every situation of our lives can be fixed by being positive and not taking anything too serious. While the idea of mixing life lessons with biographical snippets is intriguing, this book was not organized very well. The events are not in chronological order and the book has a very random flavor to it. There is nothing new in the principles that Hamilton offers. Most of them are old adages about never giving up and being positive. There is not much spiritual content to this book. With key endorsements from William Shatner and Donald Trump, the reader immediately knows what kind of book he is dealing with. One of the best aspects of the book is Hamiltons confirmation of the complete sovereignty of God in all things, including his suffering. The average reader may not find The Great Eight to be very edifying. Two exceptions to this general statement are those who really enjoy figure skating and those who have survived cancer (or who have had a loved one survive cancer).
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Review 20 for The Great Eight: How to Be Happy (Even When You Have Every Reason to Be Miserable)
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:January 24, 2009
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Cynthia
Ever since I was a little girl, my mother watched ice skating on TV. It wasn't long before I began to watch with her. I came to love the sport, until the drama of the mid 90s, when I didn't actively pursue viewing it. I always tuned in when one performer was on though, and that was Scott Hamilton. He was always a happy, energetic performer with such skill that I wondered if there were any boundaries for him. My life now does not include a TV feed, so I haven't watched ice skating in a long time, but I've always noted with interest when Hamilton is in the news. In that way, I've followed the news of his cancer and his tumor. I was excited to see he had a new book out and began to read with much enthusiasm. I wish I could say the enthusiasm stayed at a high level, but it has fluctuated during the reading of The Great Eight.I loved the stories he had to share from his life and some of his points are very good, relevant, and true. Honestly, I can't pinpoint my exact problem with the book. I feel uncomfortable with the idea that the goal in life is to be happy. I think his great eight can certainly make life better, but it doesn't mean you will be happier. And ultimately, not all his points are backed up biblically. He does pull some scripture in, which is good, but at other times it is based solely on his personal experience, which for me, is a bit too much "church of Scott."To summarize, it's a great read about his life and how he has managed to not just survive, but thrive through his illnesses. It has great principles on being honest with yourself and others. As a book on personal growth, it needs to be rooted in something more. On my 1-3 rating scale, I give it a 2.
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