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Customer Reviews for Paraclete Press Flunking Sainthood: A Year of Breaking the Sabbath, Forgetting to Pray, and Still Loving My Neighbor

Paraclete Press Flunking Sainthood: A Year of Breaking the Sabbath, Forgetting to Pray, and Still Loving My Neighbor

In Flunking Sainthood, a memoir by Jana Reiss, the author shares her attempt to reconnect with her faith for an entire year by tackling twelve spiritual practices - one a month. Humorous and humble, she admits she failed at every single discipline. What emerges is a vulnerable story of the quest for perfection and the reality of failure, which turns out to be a valuable spiritual practice in an of itself.
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Customer Reviews for Flunking Sainthood: A Year of Breaking the Sabbath, Forgetting to Pray, and Still Loving My Neighbor
Review 1 for Flunking Sainthood: A Year of Breaking the Sabbath, Forgetting to Pray, and Still Loving My Neighbor
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Date:May 5, 2012
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Craig M
Location:Lawrence, KS
Age:35-44
Gender:male
Flunking Sainthood is about the author's year of experimenting with various spiritual disciplines for a month each and the difficulties she encountered. Being sympathetic to the frustrations of practicing new spiritual disciplines, I was excited about the concept of this book and had high expectations. Unfortunately, the book did not live up to these expectations.
The book is well-written and mostly an enjoyable read. However, in so many cases the author took the discipline to a legalistic extreme (no tearing toilet paper on the Sabbath) and took the most ridiculous interpretation of whatever book she was reading related to the discipline. The author is at times whiny, profane, mildly amusing, and, occasionally, usually near the end of a chapter, she has a profound insight about the discipline and the Christian life.
I found the epilogue to be the most moving and profound part of the book. The author shows that the practice of the disciplines, even in the midst of the frustration and failure, is really transforming her. She really gets it.
In summary, I thought the concept for the book had huge potential, but did not live up to that potential. Honestly, if my expectations were not so high, I might have given it four stars instead of three. In the final analysis, I am glad I read the book.
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