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Customer Reviews for Zondervan Soul Keeping: Caring for the Most Important Part of You

Zondervan Soul Keeping: Caring for the Most Important Part of You

Anxiety. Depression. Fear. Loneliness. These are all symptoms of a soul that has lost touch with its source of life. Like a flower snipped from the vine, the soul that is not turned toward God can only wither away.

In Soul Keeping, bestselling author John Ortberg sheds light on the most overlooked, underrated, and least-understood part of your being. With a workable and relevant approach, he shows how living the "with God" life isn't just a good idea--it's the only way to find lasting peace and satisfaction. Hardcover.

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6 out of 6100%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for Soul Keeping: Caring for the Most Important Part of You
Review 1 for Soul Keeping: Caring for the Most Important Part of You
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Honest, specific and written with love

Date:May 10, 2014
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RecipesDealsEtc
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
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The Soul is quite the mystery isn't it? It is referred to very often in scripture and sung about in churches weekly, and yet defining the soul or locating it even can be a challenge. If you are feeling an emptiness and desire to see if your soul is calling to you, then this book is a great start. John Ortberg has written a lovely book, filled with kindness, humor and raw truth for any reader desiring to do exactly what the book says "care for the most important part of you". Ortberg takes the reader through his discussions with Dallas Willard and explains what he learned about the soul from Willard and then of course scripture as well. I appreciated how specifically and throughly Ortberg helps the reader self identify warning areas where the soul is concerned and also how the reader is not left empty but is given tools to learn how to care for themselves. This is a great read for any person desiring to grow deeper in their personal relationship with Jesus.
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Review 2 for Soul Keeping: Caring for the Most Important Part of You
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Caring for the most important part of you

Date:April 22, 2014
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bookwomanjoan
Location:Oak Harbor, WA
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
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4 out of 5
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“Your soul is not just something that lives on after your body dies. It's the most important thing about you. It is your life.” (19) Ortberg received that wisdom from Dallas Willard.
That led Ortberg on a journey to know his soul – and to write this book. What is your soul? How do you care for it? How do you keep it healthy? That's what this book is about.
A soul is healthy when there is harmony between the will, mind, body, and God's intent for all creation. Sin always causes dis-integration. The world we live in keeps us from attending to our souls. Our souls are fallen and needy. That need is meant to point us to God but we turn elsewhere.
Ortberg reviews what the soul needs. One need that particularly struck me was a center. When the soul is without a center we have difficulty making a decision, we feel constantly vulnerable to people or circumstances, we lack patience, we are easily thrown, and we find our identity in externals. That's just one of the nine needs about which Ortberg writes. He also covers how to identify enemies of the soul and soul-fatigue.
“I and no one else am responsible for the condition of my soul,” Ortberg writes. (84)
This book is an important one for each of us as we make our way in life. Reading this book has given me much to think about. I'll be paying better attention to the health of my soul. I encourage you to do the same. Reading this book will help you.
Food for thought – if the quotes below resonate with you, you need to read this book!
“You must arrange your days so that you are experiencing total contentment, joy, and confidence in your everyday life with God.” (85)
“Doing nothing does wonders for the soul.” (136)
“Whenever you're disappointed, whenever you don't get your way, take that disappointment as a chance to practice soul-satisfaction in God.” (161)
I received an uncorrected advanced reading copy of this book from the publisher for the purpose of an independent and honest review.
+5points
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Review 3 for Soul Keeping: Caring for the Most Important Part of You
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

A good reminder

Date:April 22, 2014
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mojo
Location:Texas
Age:35-44
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Perhaps for me this is mistitled, I would have chosen "Soul Keeping; my life spent with Dallas Willard." Mr. Willard died May 8, 2013 and the author of Soul Keeping, John Ortberg spent many years under his tutelage. And so for as much as this book is about nurturing your soul, it's also a memoir of much of what Willard taught the author.
The first half of the book is an overview of what Dallas Willard taught the author and the second half of the book focuses on the need for a healthy soul.
We have Christian terminology that would say that when you become a Christian your "soul" is "saved." But beyond that, I don't know that there is a section of Christianity that bears responsibility for "soul upkeep."
But the health of our soul, is the health of our spirituality. It's the part of us that falls in love with God, it's the nurturing side of us that comes out of us through Christian service. A healthy soul knows when to be impartial and is humble and is slow to judge others.
I have read a few other Ortberg book that I have enjoyed a lot more. Undoubtedly he is on my favorite pastors and I certainly love Dallas Willard as well, I just don't know if I'd say this new book is a "classic" as of yet... I wasn't blown away by it, nor did it have earth shattering information that I didn't already know, I think it was just a nice read and a nice reminder.
Thank you to Zondervan for an advanced copy in exchange for a fair and honest review.
+5points
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Review 4 for Soul Keeping: Caring for the Most Important Part of You
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Festschrift to Dallas Willard

Date:April 20, 2014
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dockanz
Location:Eau Claire, WI
Age:35-44
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I have been familiar with John Ortberg's work through talks he has given at the American Association for Christian Counselors and his book The Life You Always Wanted, which surprisingly is not a book of prosperity theology. Because I have been favorably impressed with his work in the past, I was eager to read Soul Keeping: Caring for the Most Important Part of You (2014).
Ortberg is a pastor at Menlo Park Presbyterian Church in California, though he also trained as a clinical psychologist. Each of those facts are important background in this book about caring for the soul. Additionally, Ortberg was profoundly influenced by the work of Dallas Willard who in May last year. In many regards, this book is a festschrift to Willard. Not only are Willard's influences deeply felt, Ortberg went out of his way to weave many stories about the man, a welcome addition.
Essentially, this short book is a study in how we care for the most important part of us our souls. At the outset, Ortberg seeks to define the soul so that the reader is able to proceed from a place of common understanding. Once he establishes what the soul is, he moves on to reviewing what the soul needs and eventually how the soul is restored.
There were a few things that I particularly appreciated about this book. First, Ortberg does a commendable job of differentiating between the soul and the self. So often in modern thinking about mental health, we think only about the self, which Ortberg suggests is misguided. Rather, we should focus on the soul, which defines who we are in relation to God. In the world of Christian psychology where I do some reading and writing, this is an important distinction.
Second, Ortberg effectively weaves in his understanding of the importance of spiritual disciplines. As one deeply influenced by Willard and involved in the Renovare conferences, he views disciplines as important. He discusses these in more depth in his book The Life You Always Wanted, though here they find an organic place.
Finally, I really liked the last two chapters. Essentially, these deal with his final interactions with Dallas Willard. He discusses suffering and what he thinks it looks like to die well, looking at Willard as a model.
On the whole, I would strongly recommend this book. I wish more "Christian psychology" and soul care would look like this book. It is deeply relational, hopeful, and grounded in the truth of the gospel.
I received this book free from the publisher through the Book Look Bloggers book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
+5points
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Review 5 for Soul Keeping: Caring for the Most Important Part of You
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

For non-believers and believers

Date:April 14, 2014
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FindingCrystal
Location:South Carolina
Age:25-34
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4 out of 5
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I just finished reading Soul Keeping by John Ortberg. The book is about keeping your soul ‘up to date.’ It is about nurturing, feeding and pruning, when needed, your soul. It tells stories of how Ortberg has done this through his years. He started each chapter, and then peppered throughout the chapter, with personal stories.
The author says that, “From birth to our final resting place, the soul is our earliest companion and our ultimate concern.” He also makes it very clear- we only get one. There are no do-overs or restarts. He goes on to write about how a soul can be lost or sold. He describes ways in which to keep our soul at peace.
I will certainly say that this book caused me to look at my soul in a different way. It’s not something we just give to God and tell him to keep. Our soul is something that must be fed and tended to by us on a regular basis. This book is based in Biblical truths but I think one of the most important aspects is that it never felt as if Ortberg was being condescending. He was teaching. I was a student. I was learning from his experiences coupled with the Bible as a ‘backup’ or as a way to ‘go see for myself.’ He held my attention as I read this book. I found putting this book down very difficult.
Would I recommend it? Yes, yes, yes. I would recommend this book for anyone from an atheist to the person who has been a Christian for 50 years and is sure of his/her salvation. I think people from all walks of life would benefit from John Ortberg’s experiences and teachings.
**Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookLook Bloggers book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
+1point
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Review 6 for Soul Keeping: Caring for the Most Important Part of You
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Soul Keeping

Date:April 10, 2014
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Matthew
Location:Mechanicsville, Va.
Age:35-44
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4 out of 5
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John Ortberg’s book, Soul Keeping: Caring for the Most Important Part of You, will be labeled among one of the best books for refreshing and defining the soul. One of the many pleasures for the reader is the insight into one of Christian evangelicalisms best minds concerning prayer, devotion, and meditation, Dallas Willard. Through flashback scenes from one on one timeless conversation with Dallas, Ortberg finds a way to convey to the reader a man without material or worldly care, someone who cares for his soul, and to be connected to Christ. Regardless of one’s denomination or affiliation, just to have a glimpse into Dallas Willard’s life is reason alone for the book. Needless to say, the book is based upon three parts (1) what the soul is, (2) what the soul needs, and (3) the soul restored.
Ortberg begins the book with a picturesque scene which grabs control of the mind, one with mountains and pristine sparkling waters; whereby a caretaker watches over the streams, waterways, and lakes. No one ever sees the keeper, an old man who is gratuitously paid, via a town council. After years of taking for granted the provision and beauty of the clean water, the council decides not to pay the keeper and the foreseeable occurs—yes, all polluted and contaminated water. This is Ortberg’s wonderful analogy that “the stream is your soul. And you are the keeper” (10).
The repeated theme, that you are the keeper and responsible for the condition and health of your soul is paramount, but Ortberg isn’t writing a self-help book. The soul without God is lost; the will of the person devours everything in life, losing control of the body and rational thought. Inevitably, the will forms habits of sin that form against the soul; as Ortberg states, “Sin is not just the wrong stuff we do; it’s the good we don’t do” (67). Therefore, Ortberg defines the relationship between the soul and the person and the soul centered with God: “The soul cannot be centered without God” (102). When humanity is restless and without peace it is because the soul is not balanced.
Ortberg utilizes some fantastic analogies and first-hand accounts to clarify his theme of Soul Keeping. His writing style and life experiences are sometimes humorous, keeping the reader’s mind engaged in thought and relaxed. As well, when there is time for profound meditation upon the Scriptures, his use of the Psalms is splendid (112). In a time when Western society is engulfed in the speed of technology and fast-paced lifestyle, one of the major truths of the soul rings true, that it seeks satisfaction, liberty, and presence with God—namely, people must slow their lives down, looking upward and inward. The challenges of the world test the depths and elasticity of the soul. Like a computer, if the operating system of life is the soul, then it integrates everything, including the will, body, emotions, and seeks their harmony (38). The mind may crave for peace, but the soul craves for a unified harmony—harmony that can only come by being centered in God and living with godly obedience, according to His plan and design.
This book is recommended to those who are seeking rest for the soul, a closer walk with God, and are too busy to read it (you get the point). The book has some great challenges for the twenty-first century individual, but also replays the timeless truths of Scripture. It is refreshing to read a book steeped in Christ worship and one which exalts God. Ortberg possesses a servant’s humble heart, one which he learned through time—a good lesson for us all; life needs to be slowed down, enjoyed, and content in God’s plans. Be the keeper of your soul.
+2points
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