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Customer Reviews for Liturgical Press The Origins of Christmas

Liturgical Press The Origins of Christmas

When was Christmas first celebrated? How was the date December 25 decided upon? How did "magi from the East" turn into three kings riding camels? Who was the real St. Nicholas? "Packs a lot of interesting information into a small book. A pleasure to read,"---Catholic Books Review. 145 pages, softcover. Liturgical Press.
Average Customer Rating:
3.25 out of 5
3.3
 out of 
5
(4 Reviews) 4
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1 out of 1100%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for The Origins of Christmas
Review 1 for The Origins of Christmas
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:November 17, 2010
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Christopher
Location:Calgary, AB
Age:18-24
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
If you're expecting a truly academic book, this isn't for you. However, this book is written in an easy and understandable way. When the author gets to a point that most Christians wouldn't know, for example the New Testament Apocrypha, he stops and explains. Kelly does a great job on tracing back how Christmas, Christmas traditions, and customs were formed. If you'd like a source, besides the internet, on how Christmas originated, I recommend this book.
This book includes several pictures, a bibliography, and index.
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Review 2 for The Origins of Christmas
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:November 18, 2009
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P Stoika
Very interesting history of Christmas in the early Church, through the years B.C. through about the 6th century. The author does a nice job of identifying the sources for our contemporary "version" of the nativity story -- including, for example, looking to apocryphal literature, which is likely a source for some of those details. The author clearly explains that the apocryphal writings aren't part of the canon, but they obviously existed and influenced traditions. Considering that this is supposed to be a history, I think it's perfectly appropriate to identify the likely sources of modern traditions -- even if the sources aren't part of the canon.This is a much more in-depth and apparently carefully researched text than any others I have found. I appreciate that it draws from scripture but also goes beyond scripture -- because, clearly, our modern traditions draw on more than scripture too (since, for example, scripture says NOTHING about the feast of the Nativity ... and yet we celebrate it every year). An educational and illuminating read! Exactly what I was looking for.
+1point
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Review 3 for The Origins of Christmas
Overall Rating: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5

Date:December 16, 2008
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Steve Hill
The author approached the biblical text from a theologically liberal perspective. For instance the author believes that Matthew and Luke write their accounts of the Christmas story to refute Mark's account. Much of the biblical information is not from the pen of the apostles but later Christians who are responding to their context. Thus the book gives some interesting history but lacks in any biblical foundation.
-1point
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Review 4 for The Origins of Christmas
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:September 18, 2008
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Jennifer Sandberg
It is a great book on getting the background on when and how Christmas came about. I thought that it provided much good information. One thing I really liked was how it went into quite a bit of depth on the pre-Christian holidays that Christmas is based on.
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