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Customer Reviews for Tommy Nelson The Boy Who Changed the World

Tommy Nelson The Boy Who Changed the World

Teach your children that everything they do matters! Andrews's delightfully illustrated book tells the true stories of Norman Borlaug, Henry Wallace, and George Washington Carver - all of whom set off a single spark that ignited the lives of countless others. Your youngsters will see how they can make the same impact on their own world! Hardcover; 40 pages.
Average Customer Rating:
4.5 out of 5
4.5
 out of 
5
(70 Reviews) 70
Open Ratings Snapshot
Rating Snapshot (70 reviews)
5 stars
42
4 stars
23
3 stars
3
2 stars
2
1 star
0
5 out of 683%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Questions & Answers:
1 Question | 3 Answers
Customer Reviews for The Boy Who Changed the World
Review 1 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

We can change the world!

Date:February 25, 2014
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Bern
Location:California
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I enjoyed this book immensely! The simple notion that all actions big and small affect the future in ways we never imagine is amazing. The storyline and the wonderful illustrations bring to life how all our actions affect not just ourselves, but all those around us, as well.
Utilizing the idea of the "butterfly effect", Andy Andrews introduces us to Norman Borlaug a little boy who loved to play hide and seek in the cornfields that he grew up in or Henry Wallace who was just a little boy who loved agriculture and learning about plants, and finally he introduced us to George Washington Carver who "would roam the fields and forests of Iowa" with his professor's son.
At the end of the book, Andrews skillfully weaves the story together sharing how George Washington Carver influenced Henry Wallace. Henry Wallace would later become Vice President and hire Norman Borlaug. Norman, on the other hand, grew up to be a man that changed the way corn was produced enabling many around the world to eat. You see, Henry Wallace was the professor's son that roamed the fields of Iowa with George Washington Carver.
This short sweet book is a reminder of God's sovereign hand in all things and how there are no such thing as coincidence but God ordained diving appointments.
0points
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Review 2 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great book for adults and kids alike

Date:July 1, 2012
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Steve Smit
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I thouroughly enjoyed this great little book, profiling future world leaders as they were boys. I read it to my kids several times and also read it myself a lot. Whether you agree with what those men went on to accomplish is beyond the point. Andy Andrews is masterful at telling great stories that stick with you forever!
I am a member of Book Sneeze from Thomas Nelson Publishers. As a result, I have received this ebook for free in exchange for writing a review.
-1point
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Review 3 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

disturbed by profiling GMO as a good thing

Date:August 28, 2011
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Christi S
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
I love the premise of this book, that everything you do matters, that even the smallest insignificant things can have a profound effect.
I love Andy Andrews' writing that is engaging and fun to read.
Honestly though, the story about the wheat and corn turned my stomach. A book making the persons responsible for GMO wheat and corn out to be heroes is just something that I can't support. I try not to get political in reviews but since the 1940s when they first started with the GMO wheat and corn the rates of celiac have multiplied, the rates of autism have soared, allergies are sky-rocketing, among other things. We are tweaking our environment too much and a book that celebrates this is just too much.
I wanted to love this book. If it wasn't a book to inspire and to change lives the politics wouldn't matter. If it wasn't a children's book, the politics wouldn't matter as much. But I can't recommend this book at all because of the GMO issue.
+3points
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Review 4 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Great idea, a little advanced for children

Date:February 6, 2011
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noblecharactergirl
Location:Somewhere, USA
Age:Under 18
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
The Boy Who Changed The World is about children in the past who have affected the world we live in today. From a man who saved a baby to the mentor to a young boy, those children have grown up to change the world for the better.
Although the book itself is an awesome reminder of what we are capable of doing, the story is a little advanced for young readers. I read it to my 6 year old brother, and he was bored by the second page. Maybe this book would be better for older children.
+1point
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Review 5 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Everything you do matters

Date:January 12, 2011
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Abby
Location:South Africa
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Everything you do matters, the small things that you might think don't count actually do matter in the larger scheme of things. Norman Borlaug is the boy who changed the world with his invention of a super seed that saved 2 billion people from starvation.....or is he? This book documents the actions which influenced Norman Borlaug's life and the actions that influenced the people who touched his life. This is a challenging and thought-provoking story, wonderfully presented to children in a colourful and appealing way. The book left me with a feeling of purpose and the will to live more purposefully. I would highly recommend this book for children.
I received this book free from the publisher through the
BookSneeze.com <http://BookSneeze.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
-1point
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Review 6 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

A Book for All Ages

Date:November 17, 2010
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Shirley M. Corder
Location:Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
This beautifully illustrated book is one of these children’s books which will also inspire and entertain the adult reader.
The message revealed through this engaging tale is that every choice you make, whether good or bad, can make a difference. It illustrates the so-called “butterfly effect” in a way that even the youngest child will understand, yet will also engage the adult reader.
Andrews weaves together the stories of four little boys who each grew up wanting to make a difference to the world. Norman Borlaug, Henry Wallace, George Washington Carver and Moses Carver each played a key role in developing a special food that ultimately helped feed two billion people.
Each of the four stories is well told and the way each character influenced the other is clearly demonstrated. Instead of working forward chronologically, Andrews works backwards, and the adult reading the story may have to point out the significance of the names. Otherwise, an excellent book with a clear Christian message. I give it 4 out of 5 and look forward to passing it on to my grandchildren whom I know will love it.
0points
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Review 7 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 24, 2010
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Karen Kimber
The Boy Who Changed the World is a delightful childrens book, telling the stories of four boys who grew up to change the world. The key message of the story is that all children can make a difference, and that every little thing we do matters. The Curriculum Guide (available on line) is for Pre-K through 2nd Grade children, but this story could definitely be read and enjoyed by any elementary aged child, and even with middle and high schoolers.The beautiful illustrations impressed me, as did the way the author connected each boys story to the next. The font is clear and easy to read, and I liked how some key points are emphasised in different fonts. The message comes through very clearly, and the story itself is easy to read. While the message is clearly a Christian one, and Gods plan for us to make a difference is clear, it was also presented in such a way that I felt comfortable reading the story in my secular classroom.
+1point
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Review 8 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:September 21, 2010
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Diane Yliniemi
This is a nonfiction picture book for lower elementary children. Its the story of how four men caused each other to help change the world through the ability to produce more food. It starts with Norman Borlaug, from Iowa, who created super seeds which grow more food for the world. He was hired to do this by Henry Wallace, Vice President of the United States. George Washington Carver was the man who taught Henry Wallace about plants as a young boy. Moses Carter rescued George as a little boy from kidnappers. Later, he adopted him. These four men show us how our actions can affect others and cause a big change in the world. I loved the illustrations and the wonderful message of how our small actions may be part of something big. I did have some trouble keeping the story straight in my mind. I wonder if starting with Moses Carter and going forward would have helped me instead of going backwards in history. This book would be a great way for kids to practice comprehension skills as they learn to take information and process it so they understand it. I wish there was more information about Norman Borlaug and his seeds. Sounds like some good future research to extend the book. I recommend this book. Thomas Nelson has provided me with an advanced reading copy of this book.
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
Review 9 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 20, 2010
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kcjs
The Boy Who Changed the WorldBy Andy AndrewsEveryone wants to make a difference in the world and this book its about a young boy who feeds 2 billion people, but not only was it him, but a line of others that were important and connected with him that helped feed the world.I enjoyed this book the pictures were great the history in the book was fun!However, it was a bit hard to follow, I had a hard time connecting the new boy to the previous boy (which made me have to flip back and forth between the pages). I started to read the story to my 3 year old daughter but she quickly lost interest in the words and just wanted to look at the pictures. I do however know some older children that would love this book. I think it helps to teach us a great lesson about the choices we make everyday of our lives.I received a free copy of this book from Thomas Nelson Publishing Company (through Book Sneeze) for the purpose of reviewing.
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
Review 10 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:September 18, 2010
The Boy Who Changed the World by Andy AndrewsThis is an inspirational story of the lives of several different men and how they each ended up changing the world. The message of each story is that every single thing that each of us do, no matter how small, effects the ultimate outcome of many lives. Like a butterflies wings fluttering can create the tiny breeze that will ultimately end in a hurricane on the other side of the world, we each have a drastic effect on others by the small actions and decisions we make each day. In the case of the men in this book, each made a decision to help someone, and the repercussions of each of those men helping someone was that the world was changed for the better. This concept is a little hard for younger kids to grasp, and therefore some of the story could be lost on a child under the age of maybe eight. The youngest will enjoy the full color pictures even if they might not get it. For older kids, this is a fantastic and inspirational tale of how their own life and every choice they make will also change the world. I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an unbiased review.
0points
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Review 11 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 17, 2010
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picturegirl
How can one boy change the world? With the help of other boys who also changed the worldcreating the ripple effect.This book was an enchanting story of boys who influenced others to produce change as others influenced them.It is an incredibly well written, beautifully illustrated story that I highly recommend. I read it with my 9-year-old and she too thoroughly enjoyed it.The colorful illustrations are detailed and gorgeous and made it even more inviting. We noticed that each page had butterflies, but didnt know why until the end of the story where the author and illustrator tied it all together beautifully.This is an extremely well written book that teaches young people how everything they do, good and bad, effects change somewherea great reminder to make a difference for good and for God!I received a free copy of this book from the publisher for purpose of review.
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Review 12 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 15, 2010
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Amanda
Andy Andrews has written a gem of a childrens book in The Boy Who Changed The World. Interesting for adults, too, it is the story of the ripple effect created when one invests time in the life of another, using the connections among a handful of historical figures to weave the story of common threads into a beautiful tapestry blanketing history. I particularly appreciate that Mr. Andrews highlights Gods hand behind the scenes, as well as a final call to action, emphasizing for everyone that they, too, can and will change the world for eternity by their actions or inactions today. Exquisite illustrations accompany a storyseveral stories actuallywhich will inspire children of ALL ages. Well done, Mr. Andrews. Note: available is a free teachers curriculum guide online to provide even more depth to the storya bonus for homeschoolers, too. Great idea! Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255
0points
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Review 13 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 15, 2010
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Dave Wilson
In 2009, best-selling author Andy Andrews released The Butterfly Effect, a motivational book that posited that the decisions you make and the way you treat others have more impact than you may ever realize.With The Boy Who Changed the World, Andrews has created a kid-friendly version of last years hit book. Beautifully illustrated by Philip Hurst, this charming volume has lots of heart and warmth. And most importantly, it envisions children that their lives truly matter.Inspiring real-life stories include: * Coloniel Vincent Chamberlain, whose heroism helped the North win the Battle of Gettysburg, and may have contributed to keeping our nation survive. * Norman Borlaug, who grew from a skinny farm boy into the Nobel Laureate who developed a strain of seed that fed billions * George Washing Carver, snatched from racist outlaws to grow into the famous inventor who developed 266 uses for the humble peanut.Although I felt that Andrews approach was a little too fanciful in this adult version of this book, The Boy Who Changed the World has a tone that will resonate with kids and their parents.A complimentary review copy of this book was provided by the publisher.
0points
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Review 14 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:September 13, 2010
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Heather
The Boy Who Changed the World, written by Andy Andrew, is a fascinating look at how the choices of one affect the choices of others. The book details historical events related to the lives of four boys, Norman Borlaug, Henry Wallace, George Washington Carver, and Moses Carver, who became men and changed the world. By the end of the book, the reader will see how each of these individual stories is weaved together to create one larger story. The account of their actions is shared in an easily read story form that illustrates how the choices the boys made affected not only the immediacy of their lives, but the lives of millions. The accounts involve a rescue, farming, and feeding the hungry. The illustrations, created by Philip Hurst, are fabulous and intriguing. Younger children will enjoy finding the butterfly on the pages. It is a great picture book that elementary aged children will enjoy, toomine did. It provides a practical, life application example of the Butterfly Effect. It would make a great basis for a series of literature lessons for the classroom. [I reviewed this book at part of the Book Sneeze program and they provided a copy for me. All opinions are my own.]
0points
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Review 15 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 9, 2010
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Celita
The Boy Who Changed The World by Andy Andrews, reads like a story form of Jeremiah 29:11- For I know the plans I have for you, says the Lord, plans for good and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope. It's one story stretched out into individual accounts of four different people whose lives were woven into each others. Each speaks of a piece of Gods perfect plan and is interconnected. It's a beautiful and simple expression of how we are born for a reason. I LOVE the story, the creative layout, and the illustrations, done by Philip Hurst. Perfectly done. The art is gently colourful, detailed, and sweet. Each painting brings out the story into a wonderful tapestry, a visual expression of Gods goodness, blessing, and character. I highly recommend this story to ALL age groups. Simple as it is, it spoke to my heart. As one of the characters , Mrs. McLoyd, said, little things can make a big difference. Everything we do matters. Every action you take, even small things, can change the world. Sometimes we feel lost in the world; like our lives are nothing in the whole scheme of things, but if we look back we can see how simple people were used in amazing ways because God was orchestrating. He sees the bigger plan. Joseph in the Bible is a perfect example of this. He said, What you have meant for evil, God intended for good. We must trust and surrender and listen to the voice of Jesus. We must cling to Him in hope, believe that He is a rewarder of those who diligently seek Him. We must be good stewards of each moment given to us, each life that passes our way, and each opportunity we have to speak hope, joy, and encouragement into another. We cannot possibly know what can come of it, but God knows. I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I wasn't required to write a positive review. These opinions are my own.
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Review 16 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 9, 2010
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Bluvedone
Change starts in the heart of a child this is the message that author, Andy Andrews conveys in his book, The Boy Who Changed the World. The message that resonates throughout this work is the importance of nurturing the dreams of children. Andy challenges the reader to consider this awesome concept their value and the importance of their contribution on a global scale. The author demonstrates how the butterfly effect revolutionized the world. Starting with three little boys Norman, Henry and George the author illustrates how their cumulative life experiences transformed the world. Andys use of imagery the fields of corn challenges the reader to rise above their circumstances to achieve their destiny. This inspiring work encourages children to strive to do what may seem to be impossible. It also reminds children that what their actions matter. When we are faced with difficult decisions, we should not allow fear to hinder us. Children are peculiar treasures. This is inspiring work of art! Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255 : Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.
0points
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Review 17 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 9, 2010
Customer Avatar
Bluvedone
Change starts in the heart of a child this is the message that author, Andy Andrews conveys in his book, The Boy Who Changed the World. The message that resonates throughout this work is the importance of nurturing the dreams of children. Andy challenges the reader to consider this awesome concept their value and the importance of their contribution on a global scale. The author demonstrates how the butterfly effect revolutionized the world. Starting with three little boys - Norman, Henry and George the author illustrates how their cumulative life experiences transformed the world. Andys use of imagery the fields of corn - challenges the reader to rise above their circumstances to achieve their destiny. This inspiring work encourages children to strive to do what may seem to be impossible. It also reminds children that what their actions matter. When we are faced with difficult decisions, we should not allow fear to hinder us. Children are peculiar treasures. This is inspiring work of art! A timeless treasure!
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 18 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:September 9, 2010
Customer Avatar
Jenn
I was pretty excited to get this book after reading the description and hearing reviews of other Andrews books. As a childrens ministry worker I found it good but a little confusing at times. It basically told three stories in one to come to the main conclusion. Dont get me wrong, it is a good resource but not meant for younger kids who may not be able to follow or understand the story. I give it a 3.5 out of 5.
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Review 19 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 9, 2010
I recently received the book 'The Boy Who Changed the World' to review from Thomas Nelson publishers as part of their Booksneeze program. The basic concept of 'The Boy Who Changed the World' by Andy Andrews is the butterfly effect: "When a butterfly flaps its wings, it moves tiny pieces of air...that move other tiny pieces of air...that move other tiny pieces of air. In fact, on the other side of the world, they might be feeling a big whoosh of wind-all because a butterfly flapped its wings here just a few minutes ago!"This children's book would make a nice gift. The illustrations are beautiful, and it is hardback with a page for gift-giving to write 'To' and 'From' and 'Date'. My seven-year-old son enjoyed the story, although toward the end I was starting to lose his attention. I think this book would be great for older elementary school age and up. The message of 'The Boy Who Changed the World' is an important one: that you are so important to God, and that every little action you take, every little move you make, can result in something great.
0points
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Review 20 for The Boy Who Changed the World
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:September 8, 2010
The Boy who changed the world, by Andy andrew. In this book we follow the story of three people Norman Borlaug, Henry Wallace, and George Washington Carver. How they all were connected and how they all in some way changed the world. from Norman who decided as a boy that he wanted to help feed hungry people around the world, so becomes a scientist and discovers a way to use his knowledge on food to save 2 billion people. To Moses Carver who decided to rescue a small black child in a time where it was frowned on to do so. That little boy becomes an inventor who also changes the world. We see the butterfly effect of what each decision we make can have! I thought this was a great book, it teaches the lesson that anyone can change the world in some way. Just by helping some one, it doesn't have to be a huge thing, but the butterfly effect from that can change the world. I would think it would be for older children (8 years plus) as its a little long and wordy for children younger. I read it to my children (4 and 6 years old) and they got the message right away and loved it!
0points
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