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Customer Reviews for Tommy Nelson Don't Check Your Brains at the Door

Tommy Nelson Don't Check Your Brains at the Door

In this apologetics classic, McDowell and Hostetler expose myths about God, the Bible, religion, and life to show how Christianity stands up to facts and reason. As your teens learn what and why they believe, they'll be better equipped to stick with their faith---and make a lifetime commitment to Christ and the church. 208 pages, softcover from Nelson.
Average Customer Rating:
4.056 out of 5
4.1
 out of 
5
(18 Reviews) 18
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16 out of 1889%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Review 1 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

great update

Date:August 2, 2012
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SKirtonBear
Location:Sacramento, CA
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
5 out of 5
The writers know, not only their material, but how to discuss it with high school and college-aged students.
Bought the book years ago for my youth, but intended to give it to college students: the original book had the top corner of the cover stating it was for high school students... the update removed that 'stigma' as it now looks more mature on the outside.
Inside were some great additions like the questions in the box titled, "Brain Food" and some chapters had a short additional list of verses to look up and a few blank lines for the student to write out what they believed the verses were saying.
The content didn't seem to be changed other than a chapter title or two. All in all, the short chapters, the easy-to-understand descriptions and answers, and the bonus features of this book are a joy to give to our graduates.
This year I gave the older copy away as well as the new version. Both students were grinning.
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Review 2 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Short and to the point

Date:June 7, 2012
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Virginia Schlie
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
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4 out of 5
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4 out of 5
4 out of 5
This is a great book for young people. It answers questions many of them have and is divided into short chapters making it easy to read.
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Review 3 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

My disappointed brain

Date:January 2, 2012
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Steve Hyde
Location:Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Age:35-44
Gender:male
Quality: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
Value: 
2 out of 5
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1 out of 5
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“Don’t Check Your Brains at the Door” by Josh McDowell and Bob Hostetler. Tommy Nelson. 1992, 2011. 159 pages.
Review by Steve Hyde
This is a “youth version” of Josh McDowell’s book of the same title published in 1992. I didn’t read the version in 1992, so I am not sure how it compares to the current version. My guess, the chapter titles were changed to be “cute” for kids. The reason why I chose this book to read is that I was looking for a book for my son. The result of my review. . . I will not be giving this book to my son to read.
Why?
It is absolutely essential to me that my son knows what he believes. The basic pattern of this book is to give an argument about what the world says about Jesus, then it gives verses for the reader to think about in contrast with the “myth”. Ultimately, it follows the logical arguments of apologetics in which 1+1 = 2. However, we don’t live in that world anymore. 1+1 in today’s world can equal 72 if you want. I believe the approach of “apologetics” to debate about the truth of Jesus is not of much value today. People are not swayed by arguments, nor are people’s beliefs defined by a set of logical arguments. I think today, belief is largely formed by one’s life experiences, past education and self-study, and what those around us believe (peer acceptability). This book only hits one aspect of developing a person’s belief (education), however, for an adolescent audience this book is going to be a tough sell.
Who would buy this book?
The audience of this book is not really youth. Youth world probably never buy this book. The cover design is dated. The chapter headings are dated. Consider “Chapter 2: The Luke Skywalker God”. A 21st century youth probably doesn’t know much about Luke Skywalker like I do (I’m 40!). Much of the content is also dated. In Chapter 5 it gives the example of 1970’s “Jesus Christ Superstar”. Really? That was 40 years ago! Even older than that was chapter 28’s subtitle “The Elmer Gantry Myth”. I had to look up the story, it was from a book in 1929 which mocked “evangelists” and those public Christians. It asserted that these “evangelists” were really living a double life and did their “ministry” for private gain. Chapter 42 starts off my quoting from Belinda Carlisle 1988 song “Heaven is a place on earth.” I wonder what a young person born around the millennium thinks about a 1988 singer. My guess is nothing.
So, who is this book for? I think the publisher was looking to hit 40 to 50 year old Sunday school teachers who would buy a bunch of them for their youth. Unfortunately, I think the result would be some really bored young people having to work though this book for a few months.
I was disappointed with the effort put into this book to make it a viable book to teach youth about what they believe in the 21st century. It basically is a negative book. It has 42 short chapters which attempt to use Bible verses to show why a certain idea (myth) is wrong. However, this book never puts forward a “right” belief; only 42 wrong beliefs. This is why I don’t like apologetics. It teaches people to argue why others are wrong, but the ultimate outcome is further confusion.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program for my honest evaluation and review.
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Review 4 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Knew this was a great book just happy you had it.

Date:November 19, 2011
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CJ Cardinal
Location:Atlanta, GA
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
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4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Read this with my son 30 years ago and now he wants to read it with his. With a 15 year youth pastor experience, he knows what teens need to know. Great Writings by a Great Author. Thanks for carrying the BEST products.
+1point
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Review 5 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Use your brain.

Date:November 2, 2011
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Michelle
Location:Australia
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
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5 out of 5
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I believe that we all need to work out what faith we truly believe in. It’s easy to continue on with what our parents have taught us or sway to what our friends think, but until we really delve into our spiritual beliefs and question what is right, there is a huge possibility we’ve accidentally checked our brains at the door.
This book is aimed at youth and is broken into six sections: Myths about God, Myths about Jesus, Myths about the Bible, Myths about the Resurrection, Myths about Religion and Christianity, and Myths about Life and Happiness.
please read more here... http://t.co/xd1U2lIt
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Review 6 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

A must-read for Christian teens

Date:October 11, 2011
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April E
Location:KS
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
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4 out of 5
4 out of 5
I remember watching Josh McDowell lectures when I was in youth group. It was obvious that he really loved teens and I enjoyed his presentation style. He always handled tough topics well and brought us right back to what the Bible had to say about dealing with them. With that in mind, as a parent, I trust what he has to say to my teens.
Don't Check Your Brains At The Door was written by Josh McDowell and Bob Hostetler. Together, they tackle many tough subjects our teens are facing and will continue to face in college:
-challenges to their Christian faith
-the validity of the Bible
-differing worldviews
There are 42 chapters in the book, divided into six sections. The sections confront different myths that society uses to destroy our :
-Myths About God
-Myths About Jesus
-Myths About The Bible
-Myths About The Resurrection
-Myths About Religion And Christianity
-Myths About Life And Happiness
The world has a message to sell, and it's not the same message I'm trying to instill in my children. They sell it aggressively, slipping it into the books, music, tv shows, movies, and curriculum that our children are surrounded with daily. If our children aren't grounded in their faith, with a firm understanding of their beliefs and the Bible, they can be easily misled. Don't Check Your Brains At The Door helps parents, Sunday School teachers, and youth group leaders develop a strong Biblical worldview in preteens and teens.
I love this book! I will be using it in my own family. The chapters are short, with relevant examples to make their point. Since I have younger children, as well as older children, I'm not sure if this would work for our family devotions, but for those with a smaller age-span of children it would be excellent. I will be requiring my teens to read it, even if we can't use it as a whole family. It would also be ideal for a Sunday School class, Bible study, small group, or youth group in the church setting.
I strongly recommend Don't Check Your Brains At The Door to any Christian parent wanting to ensure their children really understand their faith and are prepared to defend it against the onslaught of false messages around them.
This book was provided to me free for review purposes, by Book Sneeze. I was not required to post a positive review. This review is my honest opinion.
+1point
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Review 7 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Good read!!!

Date:August 26, 2011
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Texaswebb
Location:Houston, Texas
Age:55-65
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Great for teens and pre-teens to get them thinking!
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Review 8 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great Book!

Date:August 18, 2011
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paswifelaura
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I am a teacher of 1st-5th graders and at the end of every summer our 5th graders graduate out of our class and move up to the student pastor. I spent some time looking for the perfect gift for them. One that would be valuable, yet easy to use. This book is PERFECT!!! Every other devotional I found was either geared a little too young or a little to old, but this book is EXCELLENT for a 11-13yr old! This is the age were they are no longer a "kid" yet, not quite an older teen, so they are so very impressionable still and there is no better time to get them to solidify why they believe what they believe. This is a MUST HAVE for all preteens in my opinion. This will forever be our graduates gift from here on out!
+1point
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Review 9 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:August 15, 2011
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Dr JSK
Age:35-44
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
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Don't Check Your Brains At The Door, written by Josh McDowell and Bob Hostetler, is a book designed bring a clear understanding of the actual Biblical teachings in comparison to some of the myths that have taken up residence within this world.
The book is comprised of brief chapters found within specific topics: Myths about God, Myths about Jesus, Myths about the Bible, Myths about the Resurrection, Myths about Religion and Christianity, and Myths about Life and Happiness.
Each chapter utilizes stories that are relevant and easily comparable to everyday life, especially within the lives of the book's target audience. This book is designed primarily for young adults seeking to solidify their faith, all the way down to those who are caught within that strange wacky world of junior highers who are just trying to understand where God fits into their lives.
The primary make up of this book places it within the apologetics category, for it serves to teach the truth of the gospel openly, truthfully, and purposefully, without giving any excuses. Thus it is perfect for Bible studies within a church setting or personal devotions within the home.
All in all, this book is one that needs to be given a spot upon your bookshelf, as you will find yourself reaching for its reference from time to time throughout your years upon this earth.
Dr Jeff Krupinski
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own
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Review 10 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Great for Young Teens

Date:August 11, 2011
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Cara Putman
Location:Indiana
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
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4 out of 5
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This book is broken into short chapters of 3-5 pages that are easy to read in a few minutes, but address big questions. The ones our kids have got to be able to answer if they are going to own and defend their
faith. For example,
Does it really matter what you believe, as long as you have faith?
Are there errors in the Bible?
Was Jesus just a good teacher?
It addresses myths about God, Jesus, the Bible, the resurrection, religion and Christianity, and life and happiness.
I read a couple to my daughter and she's since grabbed the book to read on her own. Each short chapter has Brain Food, which send the reader to Bible passages and asks questions about what they read. There is also usually an interactive portion to that section as well. What I like about that is it gives the reader a chance to interact with the ideas but more important with what the Bible says on the topic.
These topics are critical. We've got to know what we believe and why. This book is the perfect way to introduce these key apologetics to your teen. Make sure they can own their faith, because if they don't by college, we risk losing them.
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Review 11 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

A good book for younger readers.

Date:August 11, 2011
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pastormatte
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
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3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Josh McDowell is famous for his apologetic works, teaching people how to defend their faith.
This book is his (and Bob Hostetler’s) attempt at putting apologetic material in the hands of a younger generation.
The authors keep a great theme going for each chapter, aiming at specific myths that the world teaches (or that critics argue against the Christian faith), and quoting many Scriptures to show readers what the Bible actually says, and using other stories and methods of arguing for why what the world often says is a myth, and why what the Bible says is true. They cover many different topics and arguments, looking at Jesus, the Bible, practical life, and many other things.
As you may or may not know about me, I am an avid fan of short chapters in books. I am a slower reader, and so I love it when I can pick up a book when I only have a few minutes, and read an entire chapter/section of a book (rather than have to stop mid-paragraph and try to remember later where I left off, or just waiting until I have a larger amount of time to read and thus reading far less often).
So I say all of that to say that this book has very short and concise chapters. Typically about four pages in length, it is very easy to read through an entire chapter or two even when you have only a few minutes.
However, I would say that I found this book to be aimed at a lower age-level than I was anticipating. As a youth pastor I like looking for resources that youth will enjoy, but I believe that this book is most beneficial for older kids and junior youth. I think that most senior youth would find that the book lacks depth and it does not really address the harder questions that many senior youth are hearing from their non-Christian friends, family, and culture.
There was one quote near the end of the book that I really enjoyed, and so I will share it in closing (it came in a chapter combating “The Love-at-First-Sight Myth” which says love is only a feeling):
“Many people imagine love to be like the New World was to Columbus – you’re not looking for it, but all of a sudden, there it is! Love! On the contrary, love is more like a fragrant flower to a gardener – you plant a seed, and water it, and nurture it, and weed out the things that threaten it, and water it some more. Then days, weeks, months later, it blossoms. and it keeps growing and blooming as long as you feed and water it. Failure to understand that may be why so many relationships fail: because nobody is prepared to work at love.”
Until I more completely understand “The God-Will-Grade-on-a-Curve Myth”
Pastor Matt
—–
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Review 12 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:July 23, 2011
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Les only three character
Location:Oakland, MD
Age:55-65
Gender:male
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
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Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Josh McDowell starts with a basic principle and presents evidence rather than argument. Nuff said!
God bless,
Les McDaniel
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Review 13 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:July 21, 2011
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DUCKgirl
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
By Josh McDowell & Bob Hostetler
“Seven in 10 Protestants ages 18 to 30—both evangelical and mainline—who went to church regularly in high school said they quit attending by age 23, according to the survey by LifeWay Research.” (USA Today)
Don’t Check Your Brains at the Door gives teens answers that make sense, even for the toughest of questions. Internationally known defender of the faith Josh McDowell and co-author Bob Hostetler offer clarity laced with humor to expose common myths about God, the Bible, religion, and life to show how Christianity stands up to the test of fact and reason. Teens will be better equipped to stick with their faith as they begin to understand why they believe and why it’s important to make a lifetime commitment to Christ and the church.
This book isn't a book to read to have new revaluations about the Bible. However, this book does contain TONS of solid valuable evidence for WHY we can believe the Bible to be true. It reminded me of the Case for Christ, but in a teen friendly version. This book can be used for personal growth, and the questions/references at the end of each chapter make it a useful tool for youth groups. You would need a good group of kids to use this as your youth group. But Leaders could pull from this book without the kids knowing and it could still be great. Great general knowledge about false religions, cults, and other lame arguments that can (and will) be thrown at you during your Christian walk. I am a christian and enjoyed the book, I don't know how Non-Christians would feel.
Disclosure of Material Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher free of charge as a member of the BookSneeze program. In exchange for the book, I agreed to write a review, HOWEVER, the opinions here are my own and I was not required to write a positive review.
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Review 14 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Good read for teens

Date:July 20, 2011
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Mari toz
Location:WI
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
This week I read Don't Check Your Brains at the Door by Josh McDowell and Bob Hostetler. This book is geared toward youth, so I tried to put my brain back into those channels. The book is very attractively set up. Which is pretty important for teen readers...If it doesn't look interesting, they aren't going to read it. The chapters/sections were also brief...also good for some teen readers. I loved the way the chapters were done. The authors presented a common myth and then debunked it using God's word and simple logic. For example, a chapter was called "Everybody's doing it" The conformist myth. The only problem I found was I wasn't always sure they took it far enough. Sometimes I felt like they were just about to hit it head on and the page and a half "chapter" was over. That aside, there is one chapter that I felt was spot on (there were more than one...this was just the clincher for me). The section on doubt was presented that doubt is not a bad thing. Doubt leads to inquiry which leads to figuring out what you believe. The books says, "Doubt is not the opposite of faith. It is the forefather of faith. Doubt does not cancel faith; it should give way to faith."
I received this book for free as part of the Booksneeze program of Thomas Nelson publishing. I was not required to write a positive review.
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Review 15 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:July 20, 2011
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families4god
Location:PA
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
This is a devotional book that I would recommend for early teens or older teens who are just beginning their walk with God. Each day is only a couple of pages making it light reading material. At the end of each days reading there are scripture verses that the readers are encouraged to look up on their own. There are little stories within most of the daily readings which help to hold the attention of the readers. The lessons are all focused on helping teens live out their faith.
There is nothing too theologically deep with the pages of this book, yet it is great at reaching and holding the interest of those who are not looking for an indepth Bible Study but are looking to walk closer with God. Note: There is mention of sex, virginity, etc. within some of the daily readings. The writing is done tastefully and definitely encourages the readers to follow God's beautiful plan for sex: wait until marriage. However, with that being said, you may want to wait to share this book with your child until you are certain they can understand such topics. The book was written for teens making the content appropriate. I have a mature 10-year old, however, who I feel is spiritually mature enough to really like this book, but not yet educated enough sexually to obtain all the benefits of this book.
This book will definitely go on my shelf to give her in another year or so.
I rate this book a 4 star. I love the content of the book, but it did not leave me excited to share it with others. Those who choose to buy it will definitely benefit from the content.
+1point
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Review 16 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

A nice introduction to apolygetics

Date:July 20, 2011
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ajthompson
Location:South Dakota
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
My husband and I had been looking for something to use in his junior high sunday school class at church. We recently came across this book and are very excited to use it this fall. The book is broken down into very short chapters dealing with various issues of apolygetics. It is divided into 6 parts: Myths about God, myths about Jesus, Myths about the Bible, Myths about the resurrection, myths about Christianity and religion, and myths about life and happiness. Each chapter is about 3 pages long with an exercise at the end including Bible verses to back it up. Some of the chapters I especially liked are: The Telephone Game (the Bible was copied so many times that we can't trust it's accuracy), Playing Dead (the myth that Jesus just fainted), and When the Roll is called Up Yonder, Everybody'll be there.
I think this book will really appeal to young teens. It's a light read, it's humerous, and it's really interesting stuff for kids who haven't heard it yet.
I received this book for free from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review.
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Review 17 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

Disappionting

Date:July 18, 2011
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Anthony Shuler
Location:Kansas, USA
Age:18-24
Gender:male
Quality: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
Value: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
Josh McDowell is a good author and one which I have a large selection of books by and have greatly enjoyed most of them. However, every author at times writes books that are totally beneath them. This is a perfect example of that. This book first of all is written for teenagers so it’s not very enjoyable for adults. I won’t judge it completely on that basis though. My biggest beef with the book is as follows: The authors state in the in the introduction that it is wrong of teenagers to simply mimic or copy the faith of parents or peers. I totally agree. Then the rest of the book is filled with really short defenses that are not well supported so that you basically have to takes the authors’ word for it. The reader deserves better than this. This is not a good apologetics book. You’ll get a lot of Christian defense arguments but absolutely will not be able to actually defend your faith. Josh McDowell could have done better. I know because he usually does (for example New Evidence That Demands A Verdict and other good books). Unfortunately, whether your a teenager or an adult I do not recommend this book.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Review 18 for Don't Check Your Brains at the Door
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Good Start, But Lacks Depth

Date:July 15, 2011
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AJsBookshelf
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
Don't Check Your Brains at the Door by Josh Mcdowell and Bob Hostetler is a nonfiction book for teens about some of the tough questions in life. The book is broken down into six divisions about some myths teens face.The divisions are Myths about God, Myths about Jesus, Myths about the Bible, Myths about the Resurrection, Myths about Religion and Christianity, and Myths about Life and Happiness.
I found this book to be good for new teen Christians who may not understand everything that they believe. Its somewhat similar to the Case for Christ series (both adult and children versions) and maybe the Truth Project by Focus on the Family. I'd probably put this one as something to read before reading of viewing the previously mentioned media. I wish there would've been more proof in this book as is shown in the Case for Christ and Truth Project series. I wasn't a huge fan of the first two divisions because I felt there wasn't much proof other than references to the Bible, which are great, but I think a better foundation could have been set. This book is a quick read, though, so I don't know if the authors were set to space constraints. The arguments could have been fleshed out a little more. I did appreciate the chapters towards the back, though. Sort of reminded me that I'm not alone in my stand for what is right when usually I'm the only one in my group of friends. I was reminded to look at the big picture, which is serving and glorifying God.
Note: Thanks to the publisher for providing me with a free copy of this book for reviewing purposes.
+1point
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