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Customer Reviews for Tyndale House All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2

Tyndale House All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2

Monica Brisbane loves being a modern girl in the Roaring Twenties. Her job writing a gossip column allows her access to all the local speakeasys in Washington, D.C., where she can dance the night away-and find fodder for her next article. But when the owner of the Capitol Chatter newspaper passes away, Monica wonders what will happen to her job, and the lifestyle she loves.
Average Customer Rating:
4.2 out of 5
4.2
 out of 
5
(15 Reviews) 15
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Rating Snapshot (15 reviews)
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12 out of 1580%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Review 1 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Okay

Date:July 17, 2014
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Virginia
Location:upstate NY
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
Monica is a writer for a tabloid magazine in Washington, D.C. during the Roaring 20's. When a new editor arrives, she clashes with him initially, but later on they become friends.
I thought the book was okay. The overall story was good but I was not amused at Monica's wild ways (illegal drinking, sleeping with a married man, etc.) and that she spent most of the book feeling there were consequences for her actions. The Christian element usually found in Christian fiction books was lacking in this story for the most part, and the ending seemed to be rushed.
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Review 2 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Fun Historical Fiction

Date:July 12, 2014
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CGirl87
Age:18-24
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I think I can honestly say that this book was unlike any other novel that I have ever read – in a good way. Monica is a gossip reporter who frequently visits speakeasies and writes about them in her column “Monkey Business”. Max has just inherited the paper she writes for and has left his job as an editor for an evangelist’s magazine to manage it. When he arrives, he begins making significant changes to the content of the paper, especially to her column. But will she survive swapping the glamour of the nightlife scene for reporting on a club of women who are opposed to flirting?
The contrast between the two main characters and the situations that result from the clashes between them were highly entertaining. Personally, I found it refreshing to see a departure from the typical “bad boy meets good girl” storyline. Ms. Pittman uses snappy dialogue, sympathetic characters, and a unique cast of supporting characters to weave a quirky story that stands out. While not afraid to address serious subject matter she does so with great tact.
I would recommend this book to anyone who likes unique historical fiction, and I look forward to reading the next installment in the series!
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Review 3 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Thoroughly modern Monica

Date:July 2, 2014
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luvs to cook
Location:Virginia Beach, VA
Age:Over 65
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
This is an interesting story of a thoroughly modern girl Monica who works for the newspaper in the roaring 1920’s when there were speakeasies where people could meet and drink the night away unless there was a police raid. The editor of the paper died suddenly, leaving the paper to his nephew who was working for a Christian evangelist. Max and Monica were bound to clash! Still, Monica needed the job and Max was fascinated by her beauty, personality, and love of life. How Max loosened up and Monica saw how some of her comments in the paper were hurtful and both learned to appreciate each other made for an interesting story with many twists and turns you would never suspect.
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Review 4 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:June 28, 2014
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Jessica Bates
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
It's the roaring twenties and Monica "Monkey" Bisbaine is a modern girl who writes about speakeasies in Washington, D.C. for a small newspaper, Capital Chatter. Max Moore is a Christian man who has just inherited the Capitol Chatter from his late Uncle Edward. Max is immediately taken by the flirty and wild Monica and endeavors to help her learn of God and His ways.
This was a neat little book. Some of my favorite parts of the story were the references to life in the twenties. It even opens with one of Monica's "Monkey Business" columns, steeped in the language of the twenties. I enjoyed this book. It was a nice read and ended differently than I expected and actually a little abruptly in my opinion. I recommend it.
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Review 5 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Monkey Business

Date:June 24, 2014
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rlighthouse
Location:PA
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Monica anonymously writes a column for the newspaper that allows her to visit the speakeasys in Washington DC so she has something to write about.
Max inherits the paper from his estranged uncle after he suddenly passes away.
Their first meeting is at the funeral of the uncle/boss and Max can't get her out of his head even though she is everything that is wrong for him and he is now her boss.
Even though I guessed how the relationship would end up it was interesting reading a book set during the roaring twenties
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Review 6 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

too predictable

Date:June 22, 2014
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Leeann
Location:CdA, ID
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
All for a Story was well-written, but I found it was too predictable. I could tell what was going to happen from the very beginning of the story. It is a called a Christian fiction book, but as a Christian, I didn't agree with some of the messages from the book. The hero Max falls in love with a wild woman Monica. She leads him to trouble like drinking when it is against the law. And he finds excitement in her wild living. He keeps pursuing her, against his better judgment, and in the end, she turns around and all is well and happy. It was just too unrealistic for me to swallow.
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Review 7 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

I love a good love story!

Date:June 18, 2014
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Karen
Location:Norfolk, VA
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
It’s 1923 in Washington, D.C. during the Roaring 20th and Prohibition. Monica Brisbaine is an undercover society reporter, visiting and vastly enjoying the speakeasies of the day and reporting under the pseudonym “Monkey”. Her newspaper has just been inherited by the nephew of the former owner Max Moore, and change is coming.
I do love a good love story, and this was definitely one! Of course, you knew right from the beginning what the eventual outcome was going to be, but it was an enjoyable read getting there. In an unusual reversal of roles, Monica played the wild-living girl-of-the world, while Max was the quiet, patient, solid character in the romance. I loved how faith was integrated in Max’s life, and his immediate focus was to take a tabloid paper and turn it into “a place where readers gathered to celebrate and rejoice, not to gawk at pain and vice. He offered promise fueled by hope.” What a great ideal for all ages!
I’ve never read anything by Ms. Pittman before, but this book makes me interested to read more of her work. Her characters were well-crafted, and her progression of the love story was tender and believable. I closed the last page with a sigh….what more could you wish from a book?
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Review 8 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

No Monkey Business here! Great book

Date:June 18, 2014
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Kristen Willis
Location:Bay Area, CA
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Monica Bisbaine is a flapper girl and newspaper columnist who wants so much more for her life, yet she continues to settle. Personally, she is scandalously dating a married man (to her credit, she didn't know he was married when he first pursued her; however now that she knows she is unwilling to break it off). Professionally, she skates on the edge of danger with the gossip column she writes anonymously for a local paper, "Monkey Business" -telling all the social hotspots (including speakeasies).
When the paper's owner dies unexpectedly, his distant nephew Maximilian Moore inherits the estate, such as it is, including the newspaper. He moves to DC from California and begins to make some changes. Although Monica is not happy with all of his decisions, she is drawn to him for reasons she struggles to understand.
As always, Ms. Pittman provides great characters and a rich in history story that you will enjoy. Check out her other titles as well; you won't be disappointed!
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Review 9 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Date:June 9, 2014
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thecraftyhome
Age:25-34
Gender:female
All For a Story is kind of the second book in this "all for a" series by Allison. They all feature Aimee Semple McPherson in some way and are set in the roaring twenties. I love the setting for these books and I love that Allison is portraying Aimee in a correct light. She was no saint although many did come to the Lord through her ministry. In this one Monica Bisbaine is a writer who writes under a sudo name, "Monkey". She visits the speakeasies and parties all the time. She writes covertly about the different clubs and what she wears and such. When the editor of the newspaper dies, however, his nephew takes over. Max (the nephew) was the editor for the Bridal Call, which was Aimee's magazine, so obviously he is a Christian and wants to change the face of the tabloid style newspaper. But how will Monica handle this change?
This book continues in the wonderful writing style I've come to expect from Allison. Like I said above, I really enjoy this time period and I love the interplay of the illegal with the good. This books is a great read and would make a great beach book. I can't wait to read the last one in this "series" All for a Sister, review coming soon. :)
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Review 10 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great story

Date:June 4, 2014
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CathyRN
Location:Illinois
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. This story is set in the Roaring Twenties. Monica is a reporter who writes under a pseudonym, visiting speak-easies and other gatherings then writes about them in her column. When her boss dies, his nephew Max comes from California to take over the paper. Sparks fly between the two and the romance begins. I found it very entertaining, the author describes people, places and things very well. Highly recommend this book.
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Review 11 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Date:June 3, 2014
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Cassandra
Location:Maine
Age:18-24
Gender:female
This is definitely not a book I plan on reading again. It was realistic, but that is about all the good I have to say about it. I prefer to read books about the best in people, not the worst.
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Review 12 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
This review is fromAll for a Story - eBook.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Beautiful, Sweet, Gentle, and Fun

Date:June 17, 2014
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eb7bibliophile
Location:High Desert West
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
This is a wonderful story, written with tongue-in-cheek humor and lovely descriptions. The main character gets into intricate dilemmas, and there are unexpected turns in the plot. I was so involved that I didn't want it to end. Allison Pittman has a sweet, entertaining writing style, and a skillful vocabulary. She describes the era quite convincingly. The ending seemed sudden, even abrupt, but it was fitting. I enjoyed this book very much.
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Review 13 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great Story

Date:December 8, 2013
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deanna13
Location:Jonesboro, LA
Age:Over 65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
All For a Story by Allison Pittman is a very good story that takes place during the Roaring Twenties in Washington, D.C. Monica Brisbane writes a gossip column for Capitol Chatter, a less than stellar newspaper. This job allows her to spend her nights dancing and drinking at the local speakeasys where she gathers information for her column that she writes under the name of Monkey Business. When the owner of the newspaper dies, his nephew, Max Moore, moves from California to take over the leadership of the paper. Max wants to turn the Capitol Chatter into a newspaper that is respectable with Christian values. Max gives Monica a challenging assignment which is to infiltrate and then report on the Anti-Flirt Society. After meeting with the young women in the group, Monica begins to question her way of life.
The author has a way of pulling the reader into the story. When I first started reading the story I did not care for Monica but as I kept reading I began to see her in a different light. All the characters came to life on the pages of the book and I felt as if I knew every one of them, some I loved and some I greatly disliked. The scenes that took place in a speakeasy were so well developed that I could almost smell the smoke and liquor. I especially liked the way that the author developed the character of Max. He was a Christian and was determined to turn the inferior newspaper into a paper of value. Probably the best part of the story was watching Monica turn her life around. The book has a satisfactory ending and I would like to see a sequel to read more about Max and Monica.
I recommend this book to anyone who likes a good story that takes place during the Roaring Twenties and that also includes a great deal of history and a little romance.
Tyndale House Publishers via Net Galley provided me with a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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Review 14 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Meaningful Story that Carries You to the 1920s...

Date:December 1, 2013
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Rambling Reader
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Allison Pittman consistently delivers novels rooted firmly in faith and history. I am always excited to delve into her stories and experience the past. "All for a Story" reads like a 1920's movie, with flappers, speakeasies, dancing, and dialogue that seems completely authentic to the time period. Pittman also introduces readers to another product of the 1920s - the Anti-Flirt Society. The incorporation of less well-known pieces of history is one of the reasons that I love Allison Pittman's novels. She is an expert in blending historical facts into the body of a meaningful plot. Pittman delves deeper than the flappers of the Roaring Twenties to give readers a new perspective on the era.
From speakeasies to anti-flirt meetings, Monica Brisbaine will go almost anywhere for a story for her Monkey Business newspaper column. The Monkey Business columns are clever additions to the plot with turns of phrase that seem like they could be straight from the 1920s. They show Monica as a woman who is well-versed in worldly ways, a cynical character with rough edges behind a polished veneer. Her flirtatious, flapper facade hides her true emotions. The layers begin to peel away when she meets her new boss, Max Moore, a man who is much more innocent than she. He challenges Monica's newspaper column and her entire way of life.
Max is a sweet hero, striving to live an honest and clean life and quietly showing his love for Monica. Unfortunately, Monica is not accustomed to being treated like a lady, and the road to her heart is a challenging journey. It is frustrating to watch Monica continue to keep Max at a distance, and she never seems to fully open up to him. As a result, the love story aspect of the plot feels a little unfinished. When the novel concludes, Monica seems to finally begin to open her heart to both Max and the readers. I have never had difficulty connecting with Pittman's characters in the past, but Monica is a challenge. Although her character softens throughout the plot, her wall never completely comes down, leaving me feeling detached. Regardless of my lack of connection, Monica's flapper persona is solidly constructed and a stark contrast to Max's more staid personality.
"All for a Story" is a well-written novel with fascinating history. I always recommend Allison Pittman's novels to other readers, and this one is no exception.
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Review 15 for All for a Story, All For a Song Series #2
This review is fromAll for a Story - eBook.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Finding their Way

Date:December 29, 2013
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mcaldwell
Location:Erie, PA
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Max and Monica are polar opposites, at least on the outside, in this story by Allison Pittman. Monica was set apart from her family at too young of an age. She jumped into the flapper and speakeasy scene at a tender age. Probably for survival and certainly to mask her loneliness, Monica flirts, drinks and parties without regard to the impact on her own soul and the people in her path that it might hurt. Max seems a serious man who is a bit too solitary for his own sake. Responsible and willing, Max steps into the newspaper business left to him by his deceased uncle. Monica writes for the paper and their lives become entwined. Our hero, Max, is a man of God who realizes that any relationship with Monica will not work unless she, too, has belief in her God-given value. Cheer for them both as these lost souls find their way.
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