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Customer Reviews for Multnomah Books Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist

Multnomah Books Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist

Strengthen your relationship with God simply by enjoying him and his creation. Piper compellingly reveals why your deepest and most enduring happiness can only be found in God. Laying biblical foundations for a life of celebration, he describes how to glorify the Lord by truly desiring and enjoying him. Includes a discussion guide. 320 pages, softcover from Multnomah.
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21 out of 2488%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Review 1 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Pursuit of Pleasure

Date:July 1, 2013
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Phronsie Howell
Age:25-34
Gender:female
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5 out of 5
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This book actually surpassed my expectations. I thought it would be good but I didn't think it was going to be this good. Definitely going to have to re-read it to digest everything.
John Piper presents a solid case for why the Christian pursuit of pleasure (by bringing God glory) is essential. It's what will ultimately bring us the most joy.
Highly recommended read for anyone, honestly. It'd make a really good small group study, or even something the church as a whole could work through.
Disclaimer: I received this book for free from Waterbrook Multnomah in exchange for an honest review.
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Review 2 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Learning to Delight in God

Date:June 17, 2013
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Heather King
Location:Gloucester, VA
Age:25-34
Gender:female
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5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
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Hedonism and Christianity seem an impossible combination and I wasn’t sure how they could be reconciled until reading John Piper’s book: Desiring God. In it, he argues that “God is most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in Him.” That is the unexpected twist of Christian hedonism. It’s not that we live a life focused on worldly pleasure or our own fickle and selfish desires. It’s that we refuse to be satiated by the temporary, unsatisfying, addictive pleasures offered to us by the world that only reach a superficial part of our soul. Instead, we hinge all of our pleasure, all of our delight, all of our joy on God, His glory, fulfilling His purposes, and worshiping Him.
Desiring God is a dense work, filled with theological arguments and careful examinations of Scripture. It is worth reading slowly, considering carefully and meditating on over time. John Piper also addresses various criticisms of his philosophy that have been raised since the first publication of the book and does so with a gentle, but thorough explanation.
Throughout the book, he discusses how Biblical teaching on marriage, worship, finances, missions, suffering and more all point to how we should be delighting in God. To me, the point was never so clear as it was in the chapters on worship, as he walked through the difference between dutiful worship versus spontaneous and overflowing praise. Piper compared giving his wife an anniversary gift or spending time with her because he loved her versus acts of love done simply because “he has to.” I would want my husband to want to be with me, to love me enough to want to give to me. Acts of service, gifts, time spent with each other and the like should all flow out of love for one another. If he handed me flowers on our anniversary and said, “Here’s my obligatory offering of love,” our marriage would be in serious trouble! It’s not any different with God.
He presents intriguing arguments about the place of emotion in our relationship with God, ones that I hadn’t considered before. It’s true that when you read Scripture, it clearly argues for an emotional interaction with God. Our faith isn’t just cold, hard facts. It’s relational. It involves passion, joy, and love. We’ve been talking about emotions in the negative for so long, especially as Christians, but surely King David was both strong and sensitive. And as we worship, we worship with both spirit and truth, not all of one and none of the other.
To some, it might seem like an arbitrary question. What difference does it really make whether you’re a “Christian hedonist” or not? Why bother with all these weighty arguments? Yet, when you’ve completed the book, you’ll have walked through a foundation for doctrine, looking at what is a saving faith, what should worship look like, how do we relate to God, and what does this look like in the practical and everyday living out of our lives in marriage, finances, missions, and more.
I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review and the opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Review 3 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Life Changing!

Date:February 26, 2013
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Jimmy Reagan
Location:West Union, OH
Age:35-44
Gender:male
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5 out of 5
5 out of 5
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Can we make sense of satisfaction or real joy? It’s one life’s most common questions. Answers for most people are rather less common. I’m interested in knowing, aren’t you? Here’s a book to show us the way.
The subtitle of “Meditations of a Christian Hedonist” tells you what a unique writing John Piper presents to us in this revised edition published by Multnomah. It’s interesting that he has to answer for his writings 25 years later when life had opportunity to test his theories. I found it a real challenge to my Christian life. He goes against so much conventional wisdom, but really discusses the subject with a Bible ever in his hands.
Don’t let the term “Christian Hedonist” turn you off. He certainly isn’t suggesting that you throw your life away in a pointless pursuit of worldly pleasures. Quite the opposite, he simply believes that life’s greatest joy comes from seeking joy in God. He further proves that this is exactly what the Lord enjoys from us. As he says, “This is a serious book about being happy in God.” We all want to be happy and this truly is the only way. This works beautifully in that: “We get the mercy; He gets the glory. We get the happiness in Him; He gets the honor from us.”
He tweaks the famous confession to “The chief end of man is to glorify God by enjoying Him forever.” I think he makes a powerful case that the Bible actually teaches this very thing. His chapter on the “The Happiness of God” is hard to refute. Apparently, in the last 25 years several have tried.
Mr. Piper weaves his premise through many of the most important aspects of the Christianity. Happiness in God is all through the warp and woof of our Christian experience in conversion, worship, love, and prayer. It gets especially interesting and life-altering when he speaks on things like money, missions, and suffering. Our modern-day Christianity comes out of those chapters bloodied but perhaps that is fair as this same modern Christianity has slaughtered our happiness on many occasions!
You simply must read this book. There’s not much Calvinism to work around if you are more of a whosoever-will man like I am. I read each chapter so much more slowly than usual. There was so much to think about, so much heart-searching demanded, but I assure you that you will be glad you took the time to read it. I can see myself referring to it again and again in the years ahead.
I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.
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Review 4 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 27, 2012
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nbcb
Quality: 
5 out of 5
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John Piper is one of the most godly people I know of. His approach to people's situations/problems is Biblically sound. He does not bow to any cultural pressures.
+2points
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Review 5 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:June 28, 2012
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Chris
Although pastor John Piper has written more than forty books, Desiring God is the one for which he is most well known. Even people that have never read the book are more than likely familiar with Piper’s resource ministry that bears the same name.
The subtitle of the book, Meditations of a Christian Hedonist, provide a glimpse into the the theme and subject matter that Piper spends close to 350-pages unpacking. Essentially, Piper asserts that as believer’s in Jesus Christ, our chief end and goal should be to find joy and utter delight in Jesus and in so doing, bring Him glory. What makes this so revolutionary for some is that Piper gives the reader permission to seek pleasure, joy, and enjoyment from our relationship with Jesus and to be selfish in our endeavors to derive satisfaction from Him.
I’m sure there are some that may perceive this approach to relationship with God dishonorable and even blasphemous. After all, we should approach our relationship to God with fear, awe and reverence and seek to please Him in all that we do. If this is you, I encourage you to read Desiring God and consider Piper’s claims and the scripture that he references, and see if perhaps Piper can’t convince you that pursuing maximum joy is essential to bring glory to God.
WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group provided this book to me for free in exchange for this honest review as part of their Blogging for Books program.
+2points
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Review 6 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Rightly considered a classic

Date:April 3, 2012
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Dave Jenkins
Location:Caldwell, Idaho
Age:25-34
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5 out of 5
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Thousands of books are published every year but among those thousands very few will be a remembered after a year of their publishing, and even fewer still will be remembered twenty or thirty years after its first publishing. Desiring God by Dr. John Piper is a book that has been held in high regard by many Christians for a very long time. I first read Desiring God when I was a teenager and read it again several years later. After many years of reading Desiring God I was excited when last year the Revised Edition of Desiring God came out.
Desiring God has been a paradigm shifting book. By that I mean that it has made a deep impact on how I live out the Christian life. Piper in this book teaches that there is no need to choose between duty and delight in the Christian life. Desiring God teaches that for followers of Jesus, delight is the duty, because Christ is most magnified in His people when they are most satisfied in Him. Piper time and time again draws his readers backs to the Scripture by showing why pursuing maximum joy is essential to glorifying God. By going into the implications this has on conversion, worship, love, Scripture, prayer, money, marriage, missions and suffering he convincingly demonstrates the integrated nature of what a Christian life looks like when Christ is most magnified in His people when they are most satisfied in Him.
Desiring God will turn your Christian life upside-down by giving you a vision of the glory of God and the beauty of Jesus Chris. I recommend you read Desiring God but be prepared to be confronted and challenged with the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.
Title: Desiring God
Author: John Piper
Publisher: Multnomah Books(2011)
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the Multnomah Books. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
+2points
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Review 7 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5

Perplexing and unsustainable

Date:February 20, 2012
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John Chancey
Location:North Carolina
Age:25-34
Gender:male
John Piper presents a most perplexing theology in his book "Desiring God - Meditations of a Christian Hedonist." The book actually contained very little about desiring God, but it did speak a great deal about desires. The entire contention of the book is that all men desire to be happy, and this desire must come from God. So, the ultimate happiness that man may find is in God Himself. God, on the other hand, has created all things to glorify Himself, and He gets the greatest glory when we are happy in Him. That sounds great on the surface. But other statements just struck me as odd. Among them, that no one does a good deed for any other reason than that it will make them happy. (He actually said this, "...the pursuit of pleasure is an essential motive for every good deed." - at location 1933-1934 in the Kindle edition). Does that include a soldier diving on a grenade to save his fellow warriors? How much pleasure was expected in that good deed?
The first issue I had with the book is that the first couple of chapters are really an explanation of Piper's form of Calvinism. Apart from my own disagreements with this view of theology, the chapters were not really necessary. (Actually, nearly ALL of the chapters were too long. Much of the content was not related to the theme or title of the book).
Although the main theme of the book (that man should find his ultimate happiness in God) is fine with me, I was amazed at the way Piper harshly condemned the performance of the Christian disciplines out of the sense of duty. He contends that it leads to legalism (even though telling Christians to pursue their own pleasures can lead to other things, as well). However, he goes on to recommend doing the "duty" anyway, in the case of a Christian who has no joy! (location 5267, Kindle edition) Basically, Piper is caught in a balancing act that is not sustainable.
For one thing, he kept reiterating that we are commanded to delight in the Lord! ("...the pursuit of pleasure is not just tolerable; it is mandatory..." - location 1871-1872, Kindle edition) But this is highly destructive to his own argument. After all, if it is mandatory, then we have a "duty" to pursue pleasure.....but Piper says that it should not be out of a sense of duty... Um...so why the command to do it? If true worship is made void when performed out of duty, why does God keep telling us (and Piper keep reminding us) that we are commanded to seek happiness in worship?
Also, he said at location 2131: "Joy in ministry is a duty." This is astounding in light of his demeaning statements against worship and service out of a sense of "duty"! So, JOY in ministry is a duty, but the ministry itself is not? He condemns the thought of Christian duty, yet says we have a duty to be joyful....
There are other problems I had with the book, not just the Calvinism and the holes in the arguments. But it is not necessary to state them all here. In short, this book was disappointing. I should have realized that I wouldn't like it after reading his chapter on "Christian hedonism" in his book "Brothers, We are Not Professionals" (which is a great book; I highly recommend it for ministry leaders). In "Desiring God," he overstated his Calvinism and understated the serious Biblical and theological problems with his view.
I received this e-book free from the Waterbrook Multnomah Publishing Group in exchange for my honest review.
-1point
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Review 8 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Life Changing

Date:December 29, 2011
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Ian7
Location:Phx, Az
Age:18-24
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5 out of 5
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I would have to say that the idea of Christian Hedonism is something that takes time to reflect on and is challenging to our everyday culture, but through this I believe it creates a stringer walk with our Father. I found this book to be encouraging to my walk and in return encouraging to others around me.
For new followers, this may be a little heavy but I would still recommend it. Piper is not an easy read and it takes time to grasp his writing style, at least for me.
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Review 9 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Christian Hedonsim-is that an Oxymoron?

Date:November 4, 2011
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pkerry319
Location:Waukee, IA
Age:45-54
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4 out of 5
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If you are looking for a book that reads like a legal brief then this book is for you. I found this to be a bit of a difficult read with its many reference to abstract theological concepts and the quoting of very old sources that require some redefinition of terms to make sense in a modern context.
The premise of the book is that the highest goal of mankind is to glorify God by enjoying him forever. This pursuit is labeled as Christian Hedonism. I have to admit that this terminology is a little uncomfortable for me, which perhaps is the author’s purpose for using it. That is to make the reader a bit uncomfortable so as to pursue the insights in the book.
I would highly recommend this book for one reason. Chapter 7 is the clearest presentation of the power and value of simplicity that I have ever read. It is a clear denunciation of the materialism that permeates Western cultures and the Western Church as well. The rest of the book thought provoking and challenging, but difficult for me to stay interested in.
I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review.
-2points
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Review 10 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A Classic for Good Reason

Date:August 18, 2011
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Christin
Location:Tarpon Springs, FL
Age:18-24
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5 out of 5
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After reading the Revised Edition of John Piper's Desiring God: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist, I see why this book has become a classic in the twenty-five years since it was first published. From what I have experienced and seen in my own life and in the American Church, joy is a seriously under-developed fruit of the Spirit. In this book, Mr. Piper biblically demonstrates that we were meant to seek our personal joy and happiness...in Christ! Because, "God is most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in Him."
"This is love for God: to obey His commands. And His commands are not burdensome," 1John 5:3. There seems to be a prevalent idea that obeying God should be burdensome. That doing what is right should be hard. But this is not biblical. If we truly love God, keeping His commands will not be a burden, but rather, a joy! When God created mankind, He made us in such a way as to not be satisfied by anything but Himself. "In Your presence is abundant joy; in Your right hand are eternal pleasures." God's commands are given to us as instructions for attaining ultimate happiness, contentment and joy! And when we obey and find our satisfaction in Christ, He is glorified. Everything that we used to consider gain is loss in comparison with the surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus!
The Revised Edition of Desiring God includes a study guide for group or individual study and an additional chapter on the topic of Christian suffering that, in my opinion, the book would be incomplete without.
I would very highly recommend Desiring God to any Christian! This is one that I plan to re-read in the near future because it is so saturated with truth that it requires more than one read to absorb it all.
I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review.
+1point
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Review 11 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Date:August 17, 2011
Well...I am going to come right out and say it. I really struggled reading this book. I agree with with what the author is saying, but I found it very difficult to read. It came highly recommended by my father-in-law who is a pastor, so I know it's good. I have read two other books by John piper that I really enjoyed. He has a very warm writing style. I think the content was a little too technical for me right now.
I received this book for free for the purpose of review from Waterbrook Multnomah.
+1point
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Review 12 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5

Not for me

Date:August 7, 2011
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Rev Bob
Location:North olmsted, OH
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2 out of 5
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From all the books I've reviewed for Waterbrook's this one is the hardest book I've read, I had to literally force myself to read it. I can't buy into the whole Christian Hedonism philosophy. My best advice is to read it for yourselves, then you make the call if this book is good or bad for you. I've included a short video of Piper discussing his book. I apologize to Waterbrook and Mr Piper but I have to be true to my interpretation of this book. Remember it's my interpretation others may find it a better read than I have. So again i say read it for yourselves and then make your own conclusions.
-5points
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Review 13 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

This book is not for the namby-pamby Christian

Date:July 13, 2011
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TrollMaster
Location:Redmond, Washington
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4 out of 5
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In this Christian classic, John Piper serves up a delicious meal of meat-and-potatoes doctrine, and explains why it is almost correct for the Westminster Catechism to say, "The chief end of man is to glorify God and enjoy Him forever." Piper modifies this to say, "The chief end of man is to glorify God BY ENJOYING Him forever."
Piper points out God has a passion for His own glory. At first that sounds like an arrogant statement, but Piper convincingly shows that God's glory is of paramount importance to Himself and is supported by Scripture. See John 11:1-6, John 17:1-5, and John 17:24-26.
I highly recommend this book for Christians who want to understand how God can be most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in Him.
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Review 14 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

exceptional book

Date:July 13, 2011
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Donna Sill
Location:Webb City, MO
Age:55-65
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5 out of 5
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A book worth reading over and over. The discussion guide at back of book helps solidify the most important information.
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Review 15 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Piper Walks a Tightrope...and Succeeds

Date:July 12, 2011
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Matt Ahearn
Location:Boise, ID
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The chief end of man is to glorify God by enjoying Him forever. That is John Piper's thesis throughout Desiring God as he argues that we are meant to experience an abundance of joy in life through the glorification of God. Early on, Piper spends time defending this idea he calls "Christian Hedonism." In this argument, he ties together God's sovereignty, His desire to glorify Himself, and our pursuit of pleasure in God. This culminates with the idea that, "God's pursuit of praise from us and our pursuit of pleasure in Him are the same pursuit" (50).
According to Piper, the idea that work for God is unholy if done in pursuit of happiness is incorrect as long as this pursuit centers around brings glory to God instead of achieving worldly gain. Thus, we should desire joy and happiness so long as it flows from glorifying God. In order to demonstrate this point, he breaks down the Christian life into several sections that revolve around things like worship, prayer, money, and marriage. In each of these, he shows the proper way to delight/fulfill joy in God while properly glorifying Him. For example, in regards to worship, Piper suggests that emotion, like joy, is actually a necessary part of worship because emotion reflects the "worth of God's glory" (88). Meanwhile, in regards to money, Piper opines that the proper manner to delight in God through money revolves around fulfilling His mission in the world (201). In the end, Piper suggests that pursuing joy through glorifying God will lead to more scriptural living, deeper affection within the body of Christ, and will glorify God.
At first glance, it appears Desiring God is nothing more than Calvinistic "health and wealth" doctrine. However, Piper actually weaves an extensive scriptural case that does not center around health or wealth, but about glorifying God through enjoying Him. The sovereignty and glory of God is at the center of the book and Piper is clear that material possessions and blessings are for God's glory. Only through using them properly will man find true happiness. Thus, instead of merely teaching that man should be happy, Piper properly avoids heresy by connecting joy to working for God. This is theme found within Scripture and Piper proves it well (Philippians 1). In this, he avoids the trap of the prosperity gospel while making some key and well proven points about joy in the Christian life.
That said, Desiring God is about two hundred pages too long. The different sections of application are helpful, but they essentially repeat Piper's main point, but in different terms. This is helpful, but often makes reading redundant and limited. In addition, the massive amount of quotations from C.S. Lewis, Jonathan Edwards, and the Bible make the book rather choppy and hard to follow. More summarization would have served Piper well and perhaps shortened this lengthy discourse.
These objections, though, are mere points of technicality. Ultimately, Piper argues well for Christian Hedonism and speaks on enough issues to challenge almost any reader. While Desiring God is a difficult read at times, it is well worth the time to investigate and think through the claims and challenges of John Piper.
Reviewed by Matt Ahearn for Waterbrook Multnomah as part of their Blogging for Books program. I received the book as a review copy and I was not required to give a favorable or unfavorable perspective.
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Review 16 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A Thought-Provoking Read

Date:July 10, 2011
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Anonymous
Location:Savannah, GA
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"Dictionary.com" says that a hedonist is a person whose life is devoted to the pursuit of pleasure and self-gratification. At first glance this doesn’t sound so bad. The United States' "Declaration of Independence" lists the pursuit of happiness as one of our unalienable rights, after all. But hedonists take this concept to a dangerous extreme. If their pursuit of pleasure hurts someone else or requires criminal activity of some kind, well, that’s justifiable in their eyes. I read a Garfield cartoon last week that illustrated this perfectly. (That’s right. Garfield is a hedonist. I suspect all cats are. But they’re cats, not people. We don’t expect better behavior from them.)
In the cartoon, Garfield says, Happiness is what I’m all about. Then he smacks Jon upside the back of the head while Jon is drinking coffee, causing Jon to spit the coffee out all over the place. Garfield smiles and says, My happiness (July 6, 2011).
Recently, Waterbrook Multnomah Publishers sent me a complimentary copy of "Desiring God" by John Piper for my honest review. The subtitle reads, "Meditations of a Christian Hedonist." That’s what caught my attention. Christian Hedonist is most-definitely an oxymoron. But the book is a classic. My copy is a 25th anniversary revised edition.
To make matters even more interesting, I’m concurrently reading another book that includes several quotes from Piper’s "Desiring God." And both books quote Jonathan Edwards and CS Lewis. In fact, they use some of the same quotes! But the other book gets straight to the point: Christians must learn to look to God first in every circumstance of life, good or bad. "Desiring God," on the other hand, required the author to defend and sufficiently explain his use of a controversial term before the reader could grasp and accept the truth he was trying to present: we find pleasure and satisfaction in God alone. God is glorified when we do.
That message is absolutely true. And when we find that pleasure and satisfaction in God alone, we are able to help others do the same. Christian hedonists bless God and others through their pursuit of pleasure and self-gratification. Christian hedonists are addicted to God.
I found Piper’s approach curious, but he really made me think. If you enjoy thinking challenges, I recommend this book!
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Review 17 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Find joy in Desiring God

Date:July 11, 2011
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Blooming with Books
Location:Bloomer, WI
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DESIRING GOD
Mediations of a Christian Hedonist
By John Piper
The purpose of life is to glorify God by enjoying Him. We are to approach Him with the wonder of a child and take pleasure in Him. It is human nature to seek happiness and pleasure and this in turn leads to true praise and worship. True worship of God is spontaneous and from the heart not just the mouth.
God delights in the fellowship of the Trinity and His delight flows down to those who thirst after Him. He delights in His creation and shows His love by giving Himself to us; we must do likewise and give ourselves to Him. We should desire to share this gift of fellowship with others; it should be a joy not a duty or an obligation that we feel is forced upon us. True joy comes from bringing joy to others (a spouse, parent, friends, or co-workers) which is accomplished by sharing the gift of salvation.
Willful sinning is an act of contempt against God, a sign of disrespect. Many people today believe in Jesus just as they believe in Buddha or Santa Claus, but they don’t KNOW Jesus and they don’t delight in Him.
The ultimate goal of the Christian is to pursue the joy of God in everything we do!
This book is perfect for individual study or for a group setting. There is a Study Guide in the back, as well as; a Scripture index, a Person index and a Subject index and a Resource Guide.
This is a book that is very thought provoking and helpful for a deeper personal examination of one’s own personal life.
I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review
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Review 18 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A great look at being a happy Christian

Date:May 18, 2011
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PDoug
Location:Northeastern PA
Age:55-65
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
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This book speaks of a happy, loving God who takes pleasure in us and desires that we take pleasure in Him. It requires more than a quick reading to study out the scripture that is used by the author. It looks at a number of basic issues from worship to suffering in which the Christian can find joy. It gives an insightful and thoughtful perspective of the Christian life. I received this book from Multnomah Publishing for this review.
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Review 19 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great book!

Date:April 25, 2011
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Donald Key
Location:IA
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
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It is rare to find a worldview-shattering book that has the potential of setting your desires more squarely upon God. Finding such a book would not only change what you worship, but also the amount of joy that resides in your heart. For 25 years, Desiring God has been this rare book. In its pages, you will find the biblical call to pursue God through desiring Him. What we have lost through the Stoics, we have regained through the brilliant insights of Piper, which is the call to pursue joy as a valid pursuit and motive of the heart. Here, joy is not pursued for the sake of joy alone. Rather, joy is pursued so that one might have complete joy in Christ. And when one is completely joyous in Christ, he is then able to properly worship God. As Piper says, “God is most glorified in us when we are most satisfied in Him.” Hence, this book is not primarily about us, but is primarily about God and how we should relate to Him.
Desiring God is a defense, explication, and practical application of these biblical concepts. This means that Piper establishes his principles through biblical reasoning, and then highlights how the principles are played out in everyday life. This touches on the topics of money, marriage, prayer, suffering and worship to name a few. Along the way, Piper explores the Christians of the past who have advocated and lived out these principles. Piper finds C.S. Lewis, Jonathan Edwards, and Blaise Pascal to be the most helpful promulgators of these truths. The inclusion of block quotes from these three writers is one of the more helpful additions in the book. These writers developed their thoughts in a very deep and explorative fashion. This has the effect of bringing to life these truths. Piper excels at weaving these quotes with biblical exposition to make a solid case for pursuing God through joy.
The reader will benefit from this book to the degree that he embraces these concepts, as he is made into one who desires God above all else. This book is highly recommended, and will serve the reader well in developing a solid theological foundation for worship and living life for the glory of God.
A special thanks to WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group, who graciously provided a complementary copy of this book for review.
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Review 20 for Desiring God, Revised Edition: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

This book is excellent

Date:March 23, 2011
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Al Bathke
Location:Salem, OR
Age:45-54
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
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Excellent book for strengthening spiritual walk with worthwhile challenges for facing todays issues and impact our attitude has.
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