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Customer Reviews for Bethany House Publishers All Things Hidden - eBook

Bethany House Publishers All Things Hidden - eBook

Average Customer Rating:
4.333 out of 5
4.3
 out of 
5
(24 Reviews) 24
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5 stars
14
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22 out of 2492%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for All Things Hidden - eBook
Review 1 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:June 19, 2014
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Jessica
Location:Colorado
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
All Things Hidden is a wonderfully crafted tale about a young girl learning to trust in bigger ways than she could have imagined. I highly recommend this as a reading choice. There are even hints of mystery. Which is all the more reason to pick it up. The books draws you into a time when life was hard but there was still hope to be found in even the darkest of circumstances. A beautiful book about the power of redemption.
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Review 2 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Depression-era drama set in Alaska

Date:June 11, 2014
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MaryAnn
Location:OR
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Alaska Territory, 1935, offers a scenic setting for a twentieth-century pioneering tale. Dr. Hillerman and his daughter Gwen, who serves as his nurse, must help the hundreds of settlers seeking a new start during the Great Depression. The US government is sending supposedly hardy citizens to Matanuska and helping with a colony there. Of course, some arrive ill and some have less-than-desirable traits. And some don’t care for the native residents of Alaska.
Dr. Jeremiah Vaughan joins the colonists, answering the call to serve their many medical needs. He seeks to escape his own troubles in Chicago, where Gwen’s socialite mother and sister have chosen to remain. He and Gwen try to fight a growing attraction to each other, while a rich, unsavory character determines to win Gwen for his own. What does her future hold? She loves her home area, despite the hard work and isolation. The simple life suits her well.
This novel tugs at the heart, plus offers suspense amid historical drama. Two winning authors team up to present an intriguing story. I wish the cover artist had honored the description of Gwen since her long, curly hair was mentioned so often. Read and discover the secrets in All Things Hidden.
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Review 3 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Enjoyed this book!

Date:April 8, 2014
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sherrijinga
Location:Georgia
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
All Things Hidden by Peterson and Woodhouse is an enjoyable read. Their description of the Alaskan scenery was engaging, their characters real and inspiring, and the storyline one that made me want to keeping reading chapter after chapter. I especially loved how faith was woven throughout the story without being overbearing. Bringing different cultures together with a backdrop of exploration was perfectly done! This was my first time reading a book by either of these authors and I can't want to pick up another.
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Review 4 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great read!!

Date:April 1, 2014
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hulamonkey30
Location:Ottawa, ON Canada
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
"Gwyn Hillerman loves being a nurse at her father's clinic on the beautiful Alaskan frontier. But family life has been rough ever since her mother left them, disdaining the uncivilized country and taking Gwyn's younger sister with her. In Chicago, Dr. Jeremiah Vaughan finds his life suddenly turned upside down when his medical license is stripped away after an affluent patient dies. In a snowball effect, his fiance breaks their engagement. In an attempt to bury the past, Jeremiah accepts Dr. Hillerman's invitation to join his growing practice in the isolated Alaska Territory. Gwyn and Jeremiah soon recognize a growing attraction to each other. But when rumors of Jeremiah's past begin to surface, they'll need more than love to face the threat of an uncertain future." (Publisher's description)
I thoroughly enjoyed this book from it's opening words right to the end. It had many twists and turns that I didn't even expect. I loved reading about the colonization of Alaska. The beautiful scenery was so well written that I could picture it all in my head. Gywn is such a strong young woman ahead of her time. Her love for Alaska and it's people and her dedication to nursing flow out from the pages. Jeremiah's struggles with being abandoned and hiding a secret that threatens his the very thing he loves, practicing medicine. There were points in the book that I was greatly surprised by, and moments where I needed my box of Kleenex! I cannot wait to see what these two great authors have for us next!!!
"Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc. Available at your favorite bookseller from Bethany House, a division of Baker Publishing Group".
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Review 5 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

A Spellbinding Tale

Date:March 31, 2014
Customer Avatar
PennyMindingMom
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Tracie Peterson and Kimberley Woodhouse have joined forces to weave a spellbinding tale that will transport you back in time to the Alaskan Frontier.
Chicago doctor, Jeremiah Vaughan finds his life crumbling around him. When the death of a patient causes him to lose his medical license and his fiancee, he accepts Dr. Hillerman’s invitation to join his growing practice in the isolated Alaska Territory.
Gwyn Hillerman loves her life working as a nurse in her father’s clinic, but finds herself struggling with feelings of resentment as Dr. Vaughan starts to take over more and more of the tasks that used to be hers. Despite her feelings of resentment towards the new doctor Gwen finds herself inexplicably drawn to him.
Can Dr. Vaughan and Gwyn overcome all the trials that are coming their way in order to find happiness?
“All Things Hidden” is a beautiful story of love and adventure set in the beautiful Alaskan frontier during the depression of 1935. You find yourself drawn into Gwen’s life as she learns to put her trust in God and how He sees her through all the good and bad times. They show that God is always there ready and waiting for us to come to him, but first we have to ask for his help and guidance.
The authors have created believable characters that you come to love and the dramatic plot will keep you captivated until the very end. Keeping true to her previous work, Ms. Peterson continues to show us how God works in our lives. This collaborative project has introduced me to Ms. Woodhouse’s writing and I look forward to reading more from both authors.
If you are looking for a great book to read during this “extended” winter, please take a moment to consider “All Things Hidden” by Tracie Peterson and Kimberly Woodhouse.
Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group. Available at your favourite bookseller from Bethany House, a division of Baker Publishing Group
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Review 6 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great Story

Date:March 1, 2014
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deanna13
Location:Jonesboro, LA
Age:Over 65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
All Things Hidden by Tracie Peterson & Kimberley Woodhouse was a most enjoyable story which also taught me some American history. Harold Hillerman felt called to take his medical practice to the Alaskan frontier. He moved his wife and two daughters to Alaska early in the twentieth century but his wife and younger daughter had only contempt for the land and the people and moved back to Chicago. Gwyn stayed in Alaska with her father and worked in the medical clinic with him as his nurse. In the era of the Depression, one of President Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal projects was The Matanuska Colonization. This brought two hundred families to the area where Gwyn lived and soon her doctor father was greatly overworked. Dr. Jeremiah Vaughan was stripped of his medical license in Chicago, and to get away from the situation and his broken engagement, he moved to Alaska to help Dr. Hillerman who had been his mentor and friend since he was a young boy. Gwyn’s life had been hard since her mother left but she had great friends among the Alaskan natives and she felt that Alaska was the most beautiful place that God created.
The authors did an excellent job in writing this book. Even though it is a fictional story, they accurately presented actual historical events that took place throughout the book. The development of the characters was so well done that they came to life on the pages of the book and I felt as if I knew everyone of them personally. I even found myself taking part in the conversations in my mind. The plot had a lot of twists and turns and just when I had things all figured out, the plot would change. All the scenes were so well written that in my mind I could see exactly what was happening and was right in the middle of the action. Their descriptions of the mountains and landscapes of Alaska were so vivid that I could see them in my mind’s eye and it also made me want to visit Alaska. The story was filled with love, hate, suspense, murder, friendship, romance, forgiveness, and trust in God. I found this story to be uplifting, entertaining, and informative.
I highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a great story filled with suspense, romance, murder, history and has vivid descriptions of the beauty of Alaska.
Bethany House provided me with a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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Review 7 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A Fascinating Setting for a Great Story

Date:February 25, 2014
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Anonymous
Location:Columbus, GA
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
"All Things Hidden" by Tracie Peterson and Kimberley Woodhouse is an historical Christian fiction novel set in the mid-1930′s. While I loved the characters and the storyline, I was fascinated by the real life setting. The story takes place in Alaska at the site of the Matanuska Project, an experimental program set up by Franklin D. Roosevelt to help families struggling to survive in America’s big cities during the depression. More than 200 families were selected from these cities to move to Alaska where homes and land were provided for them through a low-cost loan so long as they agreed to stay put for 30 years to help establish the new community.
In the novel, Gwyn Hillerman and her father have lived in the Matanuska valley for almost all of Gwyn’s life. Her father serves as doctor to the natives and to those who, like him, have already chosen to move there. Abandoned by her mother and little sister, Gwyn has grown very close to her father and now works by his side as a nurse. When she learns of the expected influx of people, she’s afraid of changes they will bring to her stable life.
At the same time, Dr. Jeremiah Vaughan from Chicago loses his medical license following the tragic death of one of his more influential patients. Though the charges against him are unfair, he decides to escape the controversy rather than fight it and takes Gwyn’s father up on an invitation to help with the new community’s medical needs, hoping he can keep events in Chicago a secret.
Of course, things don’t go smoothly for either Jeremiah or Gwyn, or we wouldn’t have a story to read. I enjoyed the way their story unfolded. I also highlighted several insights they discovered throughout about getting along with others and learning to forgive. But my favorite part was reading about the birth of a new community in a harsh, but beautiful land.
I thank Bethany House Publishers for sending a complimentary copy of this book for my review. I enjoyed reading this book.
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Review 8 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Wonderful book I couldn't put down.

Date:February 22, 2014
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Lecia
Location:Timberville, Va.
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
All Things Hidden was a wonderful book in everyway. It was one of those books that I just couldn't put down. The book is about Dr. Hillerman and his daughter living in beautiful Alaska in the depression era. The Doctor's wife and other daughter had left because they couldn't handle the simple life. But Dr. Hillerman and his daughter Gwyn are dedicated to helping people and love everything about Alaska.
The book is about 200 families back in the states who
are moving to the frontier of Alaska during the depression
to make a better home for themselves and their family.The book tells about their hardships and illnesses that they face on the frontier.
A young Dr Jeremiah Vaughan is running away from having his medical license revoked and decides he won't be found out hopefully in Alaska. He ends up working with Dr. Hillerman and Gwyn his daughter who is a nurse.
To make matters worse Gwyn is his former fiance's sister and he is falling in love with her.
How can he ever tell her or her father the truth. He attempts too many times but just doesn't have the courage.
To make matters worse there is a murderer on the loose.
It is one of those books that you can't put down, it was one of the best books that I have ever read, I put it up there in the top 10. I highly recommend this book.
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Review 9 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

New places, old secrets

Date:February 22, 2014
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Vera
Location:North Carolina
Age:Over 65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Tracie Peterson has written several books set in Alaska and I have read and enjoyed them. They give me an opportunity to glimpse into territory that I will most likely never have the opportunity to visit. She writes well in the genre of historical fiction, too. So I was looking forward to “All Things Hidden” since it is set in Alaska and is historical fiction. What I did not realize was that I was about to discover an intriguing piece of American depression era history. I learned about President F.D. Roosevelt’s plan (or social experiment) to relocate 200 families from the lower 48 States and preferably those states whose climate most closely matched that of Alaska.
They were transported to the Matanuska Valley in 1935. They lived in tents and had only the short Alaskan summer in which to prepare shelter for their families before the brutal cold of winter set in.
The author has fictionalized this story and set it around the lives of those in the medical community (such as it was) in that area. This consisted primarily of a lone doctor, Dr. Hillerman, and his young adult daughter, Gwyn, whom he had trained to be his nurse. An influx of more than 1,000 people into their isolated community could lead to massive issues as far as patient care and infectious diseases. But there were other problems afoot in this fictionalization of depression period Alaska. Things were not as they seemed as far as individuals were concerned. Things were hidden and secrets were kept.
Young Dr. Jeremiah Vaughan relocates to the Matanuska Valley village because he has lost everything back in Chicago – his license to practice medicine, his fiancé, his potential position as head of a flourishing hospital.
Suspense. Murder. Romance. Intrigue. Fear and faith. Racial tensions. Characters shady and characters superb. Characters you love and those you detest.
Come to Matanuska Valley in Alaska and “see” the people and problems of colonizing Alaska in 1935 at the height of the Great Depression. True this is fiction. But you’ll learn of an interesting social experiment intended to settle Alaska, give relief to hungry and out-of-work Americans, and eventually become a seed to the acquisition of Alaska as a State in the Union.
DISCLOSURE: A complimentary copy was provided by Bethany House a Division of Baker Publishing Group in exchange for my review. No compensation was received. Opinions expressed are solely my own.
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Review 10 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great historical fiction

Date:February 20, 2014
Customer Avatar
lovemykidz316
Location:Missouri
Age:35-44
Gender:female
All Things Hidden by Tracie Peterson and Kimberly Woodhouse is a well written historical fiction book that takes place in Alaska. In 1935 during the great depression 200 families chosen by the government are sent to Alaska as pioneers to start a new colony. The conditions are rough and many of the colonists face sicknesses and trials that they never expected. Even though the Indian people that are native to the area offer their help, there are a few people that do not trust them and try to stir up trouble.
Gwyn Hillerman and her doctor father have lived and loved the Alaskan territory for years. Gwyn's mom and sister abandoned them years earlier for Chicago and high society. Gwyn also works along side her father as a nurse and she loves to serve others. Even though Gwyn has a strong bond with her father she is constantly worrying and has a fear of being abandoned again. She does not accept change well and the thought of her beloved Alaska becoming civilized brings on a whole new set of fears and worries.
Jeremiah is a young dedicated doctor living in Chicago. When he loses a patient and his medical license is stripped from him, he finds his life turned upside down. The beautiful Sophia whom he is engaged to quickly calls off their engagement when she learns of the loss of his medical license because she does not want it to reflect badly on her. On top of that Jeremiah's parents turn their back on him as well. When he hears that Dr. Hillerman is in need of a doctor to help him in Alaska Jeremiah decides to go. He also decides to keep the fact that his license was suspended a secret. On top of that he decides not to mention that his former fiance was Gwyn's sister.
Then there is the terrible bank robber that also heads to Alaska to hide out and soon sets his sites on Gwyn. There is lots of suspense including murders, natural disasters, prejudices and so much more. The story is a mixture of romance, action
and historical facts that all together make for an excellent book. I loved that the authors included true historical facts at the end of the book and I found it quite interesting to learn about a piece of history that I had no prior knowledge of before reading this book.
I'd love to read more about Gwyn and Jeremiah and hope this book will be the beginning of a series.
***This book was provided to me by the publisher in exchange for my review.
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Review 11 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Excellent Historical Christian Read

Date:February 16, 2014
Customer Avatar
Sara
Location:Iowa
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
This book is set in Alaska in 1935. The story is about a father and daughter that work together to take care of people as a doctor and nurse team. Life on the Alaskan frontier is not easy for Harold Hillerman and his daughter, Gwyn. Despite the obvious difficulties, Gwyn and her father have made a life for themselves and enjoy the beauty of nature and the native people of Alaska.
With the Depression in the states, the government has decided to help some young families relocate and begin a new life in Alaska. With the promise of help to build houses, transportation to get there, and the start of a better life, a number of families begin the journey.
Dr. Harold is concerned about the large amount of people that will be coming to Alaska, and the great chance for disease and not enough help. He sends a message to a young doctor he mentored as a child in hopes that maybe he might be looking for a challenge. Dr Jeremiah Vaughan receives this request at a time in his life when things are not looking very promising. After working and giving his all to his career in Chicago, he finds himself with the treat of his medical license being threatened. This move to Alaska might be just the reprieve he needs.
Dr. Vaughan, Dr Hillerman, and Gwyn work together to do their best to help all the people that are arriving in Alaska. Through measles, TB, and many other health issues that are faced in the building of this new community, the work keeps the 3 very busy.
Gwyn loves to be outside in the garden and has learned many ways to help survive the Alaskan winters and is eager to help those arriving to succeed in this new venture.
This book is filled with struggles of a single young woman adjusting to many changes in her world. There is also a little mystery, and many adventures. I enjoyed reading this book, and would strongly recommend it to others. The intertwining of faith and adventures of the Alaskan frontier keep the reader turning the next page to find out what happens next.
I received a complimentary copy of this book in return for my honest opinion. The opinions shared in this review are soley my responsibility.
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Review 12 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

From the cover on in... just beautiful.

Date:February 13, 2014
Customer Avatar
Sufficient in Jesus
Age:18-24
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
First, I want to say that the cover on All Things Hidden is the most beautiful I have seen this year.
The whole look of it... the lone girl in her nurse's uniform with the golden-lit mountains rising behind her and the wind whipped grasses all around her.
There are two other views of the girl on the back and cover spine as well. On the back she is standing near a clump of Queen Anne's lace, with the ever-present mountains in the distance, and she's staring off contemplatively. On the spine her face is downcast as if she's somber.
I love that. Those photos capture the personality of Gwyn Hillerman oh so well. She is sunny and outdoorsy, skilled in nursing and loyal with those she trusts, yet she's also a lover of space and silence.
And thereby hangs the tale, because the peace Gwyn had found in her Alaskan village was about to be invaded by 200 new families.
Gwyn and her father didn't have a perfect life. How could they, when Gwyn's mother and sister had left them years before to return to the continental United States? What they had was a steady life, her and Dr. Hillerman. He was the lone doctor and she was his right hand girl. They treated all patients that needed them, and had friends who were like family. Gwyn had a second mother in Nasnana and an adopted sister in Sadzi, and she was content.
The urgent board meeting that begins this book changes Gwyn's world all at once.
The government is sponsoring the Depression-motivated idea of sending colonists to Alaska, and the medical needs will likely overwhelm the small clinic. Dr. Hillerman writes to a friend who is an up-and-coming Chicago doctor and beseeches him to come to their aid and start a practice in Alaska, and soon that man is an integral part of Gwyn's days. Through it all she must continue to work through her hurt over her mother's abandonment and ongoing deceptions about why she left them.
Thank you Tracie and Kimberly for this pioneering story set in a land of legendary beauty, about a girl who would be delightful to know.
The ending... whoa, that is a shocker, but no spoilers! The plot tension that began building made me want to keep reading.
Plus, we discovered a great new expression to add to our family lexicon: "I don't believe in seeing roses where turnips are."
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Review 13 for All Things Hidden - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great book!

Date:December 29, 2013
Customer Avatar
Melissa
Location:Greer, SC
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Book description: "Gwyn Hillerman loves being a nurse at her father's clinic on the beautiful Alaskan frontier. But family life has been rough ever since her mother left them, disdaining the uncivilized country and taking Gwyn's younger sister with her.
In Chicago, Dr. Jeremiah Vaughan finds his life suddenly turned upside down when his medical license is stripped away after an affluent patient dies. In a snowball effect, his fiance breaks their engagement. In an attempt to bury the past, Jeremiah accepts Dr. Hillerman's invitation to join his growing practice in the isolated Alaska Territory.
Gwyn and Jeremiah soon recognize a growing attraction to each other. But when rumors of Jeremiah's past begin to surface, they'll need more than love to face the threat of an uncertain future."
My review: Not only is this a great story, it has wonderful spiritual truths embedded throughout the book. A lot of Christian novels do not have many Scripture or Biblical lessons incorporated into the story. This novel is not one of those. I was encouraged by the verses and challenged to examine my own life and responses to the circumstances in which God has placed me. This is a book that I could share with an unbeliever and know that not only would they be reading a great story that will hold their interest, but the seeds of God's Word will be planted into their hearts. I enjoyed each of the characters and was immediately drawn into each of their lives. The characters were real and the historical facts that played into the book made the story that much more interesting. I hope the authors plan to make this a series. I received a complimentary e-copy of this book from Bethany House Publishers in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.
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Review 14 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Great story of the Alaskan Frontier!

Date:February 12, 2014
Customer Avatar
Lehrerin
Location:Roxboro, NC
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
All Things Hidden is a most unusual Depression-era story with a very unique twist: the settlement of Alaska. I didn't know that the poor national economy spawned a huge government movement to shift people to the territory of Alaska, so the very premise was exciting. Since the reality of Alaska as our final national frontier is of a rustic, dangerous place, the setting screamed 'new' and 'different.'
I really liked as a leading lady. She was both humble and hardworking but human, too. She wanted to fall in love and have a family, all the while struggling with the one that she was born into. She's pulled in too many directions, like far too many of us, and she could be the girl next door.
The action sped up throughout the story. In the beginning you learn primarily about what will happen, at least according to government agents, but as time progresses the plan's problems begin to arise. With Gwyn and her father being the primary troubleshooters in the new Alaskan settlement, they're on the front lines of action - and that continues as stalkers, murder, and general mayhem ensue. This makes for a dramatic and page-turning read, and after a chapter or two, I couldn't put it down.
I've never read a Peterson novel that I didn't like, and All Things Hidden didn't disappoint. If you're a Peterson fan, this is a must-read.
I received a free copy of All Things Hidden from Bethany House Publishers in exchange for an honest review.
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Review 15 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

And enjoyable look into Alaska's history.

Date:February 12, 2014
Customer Avatar
Kate
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
All Things Hidden was such a wonderful story to get swept up into. Tracie Peterson and Kimberley Woodhouse takes us back to Alaska when the US was wanting to settle this new territory. Unlike previous books by Tracie Peterson that she has set in Alaska, this story takes place not in the 1800's or early 1900's with the gold rush, but during the darkest part of the Depression. FDR has implemented the New Deal and the push to get people working and into a fresh start has begun.
The characters of this story were created well. With Gwyn, I could understand her and was able to connect with her and desire to want things stay the same. I enjoyed that this book took place over many months and showed the progress between Gwyn and Jeremiah was a slow progression. Jeremiah, I thought had a tougher climb to understanding, but his growth was good. It also showed through these characters, that even though things happened in the past, it is sometimes hard to let them go, which is all too true. Jeremiah and Gwyn were very real with the emotions and feelings they had.
Tracie Peterson has also brought the beauty of Alaska alive again with this story. The details and descriptions to scenery were wonderful and could easily be seen as I read through this story. The portrayals of the dangers of this land were also shown an understandable way. Alaska is America's last frontier and offers such a wide canvas to work with for stories.
The only small negative to the story was how quickly the extra characters came and went from the story. We were introduced to a few, they served their small purpose and you didn't hear from them again. I guess I would have liked to have heard their reaction to a part or two. That was the only thing that caught my attention.
I enjoyed looking back to a time in history that isn't widely known about. I enjoyed reading the historical details. I find it interesting how back in the 1930's the US was trying to settle Alaska and to this day are still trying, at least back in 2008/2009, they were looking for a few more families for a new area.
Thank you to Bethany House, I received a copy of this book for free in exchange for an honest review.
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Review 16 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

An Accurate Portrayal

Date:February 7, 2014
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Noreen
Location:Colorado
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
The story is historical fiction, with some suspense, set in Matanuska Valley in 1935 during President Roosevelt's Alaska Rural Rehabilitation, when 200 families are given land to settle this rural area. Dr. Hillerman and his daughter Gwyn are the areas only medical personal and Gwyn loves the quiet and simplicity of their lives. Big changes are coming with the influx of people, including a young doctor from Chicago who knows Dr. Hillerman. Dr. Jeremiah Vaughan has lost all that he built his life around, including his medical license. Gwyn is anxious and worried about the changes ahead. A new hospital and more medical staff, will it be a good thing for their area?
I loved that this story showed the difficulties of homesteading and the prejudice against the native Alaskans. There are twists and turns in the plot, including murder. It was a quick read and held my attention.
I would rate this book 5 Stars.
I would like to thank Bethany House, a division of Baker Publishing, for their book review program. I received this book for my honest review and did not receive compensation.
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Review 17 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

Okay book

Date:February 6, 2014
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LauraV
Location:Houston, Texas
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
Value: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
This book is about a girl named Gwyn who lives with her father in the Alaskan Territory in 1935. After her mother and sister abandon them for a life in Chicago, Gwyn and her father stay in Alaska where her father has a medical practice. The book takes place during The Great Depression and during the time that President Roosevelt sent many families to Alaska to settle the territory and ease the suffering due to the depression. The story has a love story in it as Gwyn meets a new doctor who comes to help treat the many people who are coming to Alaska. It also has some crime drama in it as there is a thief and murderer in the village.
The beginning and middle of this book were good. The story moved well and was well told at many of the parts, however, the author decided to put too much detail in some areas and not enough in others. An example of this is found when one of the main characters is accused of murder, but we never get to see how this is resolved. The woman is accused, possibly taken away for a time, and then somehow winds up to be back as a normal character with almost no mention of the murder again. There are also times when the author is obviously sticking in actual factual elements from history, but they don't fit smoothly in the story and seem out of place. Suddenly, she talks about the town being shifted to face the mountains or a girl who has a pet bear, but these items don't flow at all and are sores in the book.
The religious part of the book is not too bad for the first 3/4 of the book, but gets to be overwhelming at the end, taking over the story and not allowing the drama of the story to have a good ending. Some of the theology in the book is not what all Christians believe and can annoy the reader rather than help the story. The author did not find the fine line of writing a book with Christian characters and writing a good book, and leaned more on the side of finding it important for her characters to be Christian and less on the side of writing a good book.
That being said, the book was okay. I won't read it again, but I don't feel like I wasted my time reading it. If this was a series (which it isn't, to my knowledge), I would not care enough about the characters to read it.
+1point
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Review 18 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

history meets fiction!

Date:January 23, 2014
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Readingramble
Location:Canada
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
My Reflections:
The well developed characters, the slow steady build all work together to deliver a tidy little package where mystery and history entwine.
I loved the idea of a story centering on the decision, Franklyn Roosevelt devised to help people destroyed by the depression of 1935. His idea was to send families to a remote area of Alaska to colonies and grow the Matanuska Valley. The really superb thing about this book is these two authors use real and fictional characters to develop their narrative.
Dr Jeremiah Vaughan's life is destroyed by allegations of abuse. When he uses a ground-breaking IV sedation technique with an influential patient, and the patient dies, the authorities are out for blood. This causes his license to be stripped away. Because of this, his intended and her mother want nothing to do with the shame. A has-been doctor is not what a high society woman wants on her arm. Fleeing from the hurt and rejection, from not only his fiance but also his own parents Jeremiah jumps at the chance to work alongside his mentor in a remote Alaskan village, far away from danger and pain...or so he thought.
Gwyn is struggling with fear, rejection, and trust as she tends to her beloved village as a nurse. Her father (who is also the town's only doctor) is ecstatic at the prospect of seeing his village grow with the new colonization. As they race to ready the settlement for the new families, Gwyn must come to a place where she is able to accept the change and uncertainties of her future.
This book was so surprising with it's villainous character and the twists and turns that ensued. It certainly was not the predictable book I imagined it to be.
If you love fiction, history, romance, suspense you will probably enjoy this one. There are a few slow spots where the author is developing you knowledge of the characters, but by no means does it continue through the book. I will be keeping my eyes open for the sequel to this one.
"Book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc.
Available at your favourite bookseller from Bethany House, a division of Baker Publishing Group".
+1point
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Review 19 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

too much dialogue!

Date:January 22, 2014
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crtnybc
Location:British Columbia, Canada
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
I enjoyed reading about a real event that I had never heard of before. The Matanuska Colonization was a project of Roosevelt's in 1935 to help some of those who suffered from the Great Depression. There was a relocation of 200 families to the Matanuska Valley in Alaska. It was a nice change to read about something so different than the few main settings for most fiction.
The basic storyline and the plot idea were very good, but they couldn't completely salvage the book for me. There's a lot (like, a lot!) of introspective dialogue, much of it repetitive, such as Jeremiah's constantly telling himself that he has to come clean eventually. It's often phrased in questions. "Can she forgive me?" "Will I have to leave?" There's too much contemplation and emotion. After a while I lose any empathy and just want tell them to get on with it already!
This book has been provided courtesy of Baker Publishing Group and Graf-Martin Communications, Inc. Available at your favourite bookseller from Bethany House, a division of Baker Publishing Group.
+1point
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Review 20 for All Things Hidden - eBook
This review is fromAll Things Hidden.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Good story

Date:January 21, 2014
Customer Avatar
mimi
Location:Oviedo, FL
Age:Over 65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
This proves having faith in someone and helping them is very important.
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