Christianbook.com Ratings and Reviews

Customer Reviews for Kregel Publications Health, Wealth & Happiness

Kregel Publications Health, Wealth & Happiness

The desire for a thriving, healthy, and productive life is as strong as ever, especially in tough economic times. As people become more disillusioned at the state of the economy, they also become more susceptible to the lure of the prosperity gospel and its teachings of health, wealth, and happiness for the faithful. But what happens when the promise of prosperity overshadows the promise of the real gospel--the gospel of Christ?

Believing that the prosperity gospel is constructed upon faulty theology, authors David W. Jones and Russell S. Woodbridge take a closer look at five crucial areas of error relating to the prosperity gospel. In a fair but firm tone, the authors discuss the history and theology of the prosperity gospel movement to reveal its fraudulent core biblical teachings that have been historically and popularly misinterpreted, even by some of today's most well-known pastors. After an introduction and assessment of the movement, readers are invited to take a look at Scripture to understand what the Bible really says about wealth, poverty, suffering, and giving.

Theologically sound but acessible to all readers, Health, Wealth & Happiness: Has the Prosperity Gospel Overshadowed teh Gospel of Christ is sure to become a trusted resource for laypersons, pastors, and Christian leaders.
Average Customer Rating:
4.857 out of 5
4.9
 out of 
5
(7 Reviews) 7
Open Ratings Snapshot
Rating Snapshot (7 reviews)
5 stars
6
4 stars
1
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0
7 out of 7100%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for Health, Wealth & Happiness
Review 1 for Health, Wealth & Happiness
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:June 5, 2013
Customer Avatar
jimbo
Location:LOS BANOS CA
Age:45-54
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
great book about all those false teachers on TBN' and it is very informative on how they teach to just grab your money.
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
Review 2 for Health, Wealth & Happiness
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

The Gospel that isn't!

Date:June 5, 2012
Customer Avatar
David Gough
Location:Alexandria, VA
Age:55-65
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
David Jones and Russell Woodbridge have taken an excellent first step toward exposing the inherent danger of the so-called "prosperity gospel." Far too many professing Christians are being caught up in the promises of this false gospel. The cause is widespread biblical illiteracy, and the culprits are pastors who are willing to risk the souls of their congregations in order not to offend them. This book is ideal for placing into the hands of laypersons who are indiscriminately swallowing the slick televised presentations of prosperity preachers. The "health and wealth" message fundamentally errs in being "me-centered" and relegating God to the role of "divine gift dispenser." This kind of teaching minimizes God's glory (which He refuses to share with another) and thus removes the most fundamental reason for which Christ died and rose again, which was to show how a righteous God could remain righteous and save unrighteous sinners). This book has two parts: "Critique" and "Correction." Both are well written but brief, leaving the reader wanting more. It is fairly well annotated, but the selection of source material could be broader. Direct quotations from some of the better known contemporary prosperity personalities (such as, Joel Osteen and Joyce Meyer) are appreciated, but a more thorough expose of the short comings of their teachings would have been helpful. There are practical suggestions near the end of the book for those involved in the prosperity movement and/or desiring to help others find their way out. It is an easy read, but it is recommended that the reader move slowly and perceptively through its pages.
+4points
4of 4voted this as helpful.
Review 3 for Health, Wealth & Happiness
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Recommend to all!

Date:November 5, 2011
Customer Avatar
J Lively
Location:Wake Forest, NC
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Dr. Jones and Dr. Woodbridge take the reader from the historical foundations of the prosperity gospel to those who continue to espouse this message today. The authors explore some of the major adherents of the prosperity gospel and expose the fallacies within their teachings and messages’ enabling the reader to understand how the prosperity gospel contradicts biblical orthodoxy. The authors then provide the reader with a biblical study of both wealth and poverty. I recommend this book to anyone who is seeking to understand the message of the prosperity gospel and to those who seek a correct biblical understanding of wealth and poverty.
+5points
5of 5voted this as helpful.
Review 4 for Health, Wealth & Happiness
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

I recommend this book.

Date:October 29, 2011
Customer Avatar
Sang Park
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
The authors of Health, Wealth & Happiness are very successful in accomplishing their intention. David W. Jones and Russell S. Woodbridge give lots of insights to distinguish between the prosperity gospel and biblical gospel, as well as to understand the gospel deeply. I would not hesitate to recommend this book to ministers and to average believers for the godly life of faith in Christ.
+3points
3of 3voted this as helpful.
Review 5 for Health, Wealth & Happiness
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:October 15, 2011
Customer Avatar
Ashlee Ickes
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Jones and Woodbridge seek to show readers that the prosperity gospel is false but they don't stop there. They also show the readers what the true gospel message of Christ is. This is a great tool in understanding and sharing with others the incorrect teachings of the health and wealth gospel that is sweeping our nation. Like myself before reading this book, many people may recognize that there is something not exactly right about the teachings of the prosperity gospel but cannot pinpoint what it is. Through this book you can now understand the lies that people like Joel Osteen, Kenneth Copeland, and Joyce Meyer teach.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 6 for Health, Wealth & Happiness
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

great resource, well done

Date:May 13, 2011
Customer Avatar
bookwomanjoan
Location:Oak Harbor, WA
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Christianity is a world view that impacts all aspects of life, including finances. Jones contends that “prosperity theology is a corruption of [God's] self-revelation, a distortion of His plan of redemption, and an idea that can ultimately lead to a reckless view of the material world.” (8) Woodbridge realized “that the purpose of life is not about accumulated money, health, or a great career – it's about knowing God.” (9) Hence, their writing this book.
The prosperity gospel is growing. Fifty of the largest churches in the U.S. promote it. (15) A recent survey found 46 percent of self-proclaimed Christians agree that God will give material riches to believers who have enough faith. (16)
The authors give a survey of the historical foundations of the movement and its relation to New Thought, a movement that began in the late nineteenth century. The teachings of New Thought are reviewed, including that the mind creates and controls reality, that God is an impersonal force, people are essentially gods, and a focus on health and wealth.
Then they give a summary of the teachings of the prosperity gospel. E. W. Kenyon was it's father. “Kenyon believed that positive confession is the key to prosperous living.” (52) Kenneth Hagin was it's greatest evangelist and the father of the Word Faith movement. The authors review the problematic teachings of these and other prosperity teachers and preachers.
The authors then move to the doctrinal errors of the prosperity gospel, comparing it to the message of the biblical gospel. Areas compared include faith, the atonement (supposedly including physical healing), and the Abrahamic covenant.
They look at the important biblical teachings on suffering as a correction to the prosperity gospel. They show that suffering is a “normative part of the biblical record and everyday life...” (110) “Much personal suffering is the result of natural evil... ...[T]he purpose of such suffering is ultimately to foster a person's relationship with the Lord.” (113) Some suffering is the result of moral evil, willful breaking of the law of God, sometimes by someone else.
The authors then build a theology of wealth and poverty. They admit that it is challenging to establish an ethic of wealth and poverty from the example of Christ. “...He gave no systematic, detailed economic plan to His followers.” (133) Their synthesis of O. T., gospels, and epistles yields: labor is good, the Lord's followers are to minister to the poor, and wealth can be a spiritual stumbling block. (138) The authors go over the four possible ways to connect material wealth/poverty and spiritual wealth/poverty. They conclude, “A study of the biblical teaching on wealth and poverty makes clear that the prosperity gospel is not the biblical gospel.” (140)
Finally, they look at giving, being a faithful steward. They note that, “...generosity is one of the best indicators of the condition of the heart.” (146) O. T. law required Jews to give “more than 25 percent in annual income tax to the theocratic government of Israel.” (151, quoting John MacArthur) While the N. T. is relatively silent n tithing (153), it does provide several principles of giving. Giving is to be periodic, personal, planned, proportionate, and plentiful. The authors review principles of choosing recipients.
The authors conclude by helping the readers discern if a false gospel is being taught in their church. They also have suggestions on helping you minister to those you know caught up in the prosperity gospel.
The authors provide a summary at the end of each chapter, great for review.
This is a slim (165 pages) but powerful book. The Scripture and subject indices at the end of the book are great. Every evangelical Christian needs to read a book like this one to be aware of what is currently being taught in churches. I highly recommend it
I received a copy of this book from Kregel publications for the purpose of this review.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 7 for Health, Wealth & Happiness
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Well organized, concise and great references.

Date:March 18, 2011
Customer Avatar
BwanaMo
Location:Santa Rosa, CA
Age:Over 65
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
There is a lot of history, Scripture and clear thinking in this book - it gets to the roots of this movement and clearly shows how it clashes with the essence of the Gospel message.
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.