Christianbook.com Ratings and Reviews

Customer Reviews for Kregel Publications What the Bayou Saw

Kregel Publications What the Bayou Saw

When Sally Stevens left Louisiana, she buried the secrets of her childhood under a sunny smile and sugar-coated lies. But when one of her students is raped, Sally's memories bubble unbidden to the surface. As her carefully woven web of deceit unravels, will she be able to face the truth . . . whatever the consequences? 320 pages, softcover from Kregel.
Average Customer Rating:
4.895 out of 5
4.9
 out of 
5
(19 Reviews) 19
Open Ratings Snapshot
Rating Snapshot (19 reviews)
5 stars
17
4 stars
2
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0
1 out of 1100%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for What the Bayou Saw
Review 1 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Haunting, Gritty, POWERFUL!

Date:November 29, 2010
Customer Avatar
Casey
Location:Oregon
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
From the first page, I was drawn into the very midst of this story. This book is certainly not a gentle read. It covers topics most books would shy away from and doesn’t hesitate to delve into some of the most complicated emotions. Having an idea of what was coming from the back cover, I was in suspense and breathing shallow as each page kept increasing to the climax. And even after it reached the pinnacle moment, the conflict did not ease.
Sally has lived a lie. And from those first moments since meeting Ella and then the bayou, it has snowballed to effect more lives than just her own. Her constant deception can become tiresome, but what kept me reading, more than just a great story, was deep inside you could see she really wanted to change and by sharing her story with a hurting woman, so she wouldn’t make the same mistakes, is what makes her extremely likable.
Not only does this book pack a potent message on so many fronts, too many to name in a short review, but also paints word pictures that will give you chills. I literally felt the cold sweep through me by words on a page when Sally found the scarecrow in her garage. Don’t underestimate the power of this book!
This book digs deep into the human condition. Nothing is left untouched and the most sacred of emotions have their doors blown away. Haunting, gritty and powerful, this story will invade your thoughts and grab hold of your heart. Don’t miss it!
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 2 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:November 28, 2009
Customer Avatar
Patty LeBlanc
All I can say is wow to this book. Two thumbs up to Patti Lacy for creating this story. Sally is the main character in this book. She has built her life around lies that she has so deceptively created that she can't remember what the truth is. That is until a tragic event at the school where she works as a teacher occurs that brings her right back to the reason she created all these lies in the first place. Her lies finally come full circle when she begins to tell her story and realizes what she needs to do to find closure. This is a tale that includes racism, some history, and fabulous characters. I felt the pain of the characters throughout the book and it made me feel as if I just wanted to be there for them and make the hurt go away. I loved this book. Patti Lacy took me to a place within the pages of this book that created a whole new view of events that occurred in our history. Some things I just never realized, and it takes reading about it maybe in a different way to bring it to the forefront. Definitely a book I would highly recommend.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 3 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:November 28, 2009
After reading An Irishwoman's Tale, I knew I had to read Sally's story. She is a fascinating, dynamic character, and her personal journey is a sometimes light, often seious, often harrowing, experience for readers. Sally's relationship with Shamika is wonderful, and the main secondary characters, Ruby and Detective Price, add great shading to it. I also enjoyed the scenes of Sally's childhood, particularly those where Ella appeared. Patti does a wonderful job of drawing these little girls as sisters, but not just "swamp sisters." In fact, Sally and Ella's tackling of the themes and life lessons they must face makes theirs one of the more realistic friendships in Christian fiction. Some scenes of rape and exposure are a bit on the graphic side, so I would not recommend this for anyone but mature readers. However, if you are one of those, you will thoroughly enjoy this novel.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 4 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:November 17, 2009
Customer Avatar
Christy Lockstein
What the Bayou Saw by Patti Lacy is a poignant story about the damage secrets and lies can wreak as they grow unhindered. Sally Stevens has built a life of secrets and lies she hides behind her smile and Southern drawl. She's learned how to avoid difficult situations by telling a lie that's more easily digested than the truth and seasoning it with wide eyes, smiles, and waving her hands, but it all starts coming to the surface when first she is confronted by three of her students who want her to stop teaching her college class with a Christian tone. Then her favorite student is raped and beaten and accuses those same young men. Her carefully constructed world begins to totter and fall and she is forced to face the secret she has held for over forty years. The lie that destroyed her best friendship, tainted her marriage, and has colored every aspect of her life since. Lacy describes the lies in Sally's life using several metaphors throughout the book; the best is kudzu, at first beautiful but then suffocating and causing death. The beginning of the book setting up the outer frame story is a bit clumsy at first, but Lacy does an awe-inspiring job of talking about the issues of racism that we all want to pretend don't exist anymore. The novel is a gritty, unflinching look at the sins of our nation's past and how they still haunt us today and will continue to do so until we finally face them head-on.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 5 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:October 20, 2009
Customer Avatar
Kathie C Moore
This story is absolutely captivating. I could not put it down once I started reading it. The characters are so real, flawed and human, yet I cared deeply for them by the end. Patti does an incredible job of dealing with some very ugly subjects - racism and rape - in this novel. Yet through it all there is a tender story of redemption.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 6 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:September 22, 2009
Customer Avatar
Cindy Thomson
What the Bayou Saw by Patti Lacy is about Sally Stevens, a middle aged likable Christian woman with a past so well buried that even she doesnt know when shes lying to cover it up. As the back cover says, you cant bury the past forever, and this becomes true for Sally when one of her students is raped. Sally begins to tell her story to the girl and her aunt and in the process realizes the truth that she has been hiding from herself has adversely affected the present. As she returns to Louisiana to set things straight she has to once again relive painful, even terrifying, memories. But on the other side is forgiveness and healing. The story gets off to a bit of a slow start, but I was soon fond of Sally and rooting for her. Pattis writing is so descriptive that I was easily transported to the Bayou with its murky water, frogs and egrets, and was uncomfortable being there at times, which was the point. Still, there is redemption that can only be explained by Gods grace, and Patti does a wonderful job showing this. She dealt fairly, in my opinion, with racial prejudice on both sides, not an easy thing to do.What the Bayou Saw is an intense story, but one that you wont stop thinking about for a long time.Cindy ThomsonAuthor of Brigid of Ireland
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 7 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:August 6, 2009
Customer Avatar
Bonnie Engstrom
Lacy has again crafted a multi-layered story that recounts years of pain but result in moments of healing.Sally Stevens has a secret. One even she cant bear to give more than a fleeting thought to for over two decades. Only her childhood best friend, Ella, and the Louisiana bayou are privy to it. And, the murdered man.Sally lied her way through twenty-five years. Lied to her husband, her children and, mostly, to herself. Until she meets her student, Shamika, and Ruby, Shamikas aunt. Sisters in the flesh, but not in color.This is a powerful story about color. Prejudice. Denial. Fear. And Gods encouragement His plan for healing of the soul. It is a story of three women one who is in denial, one who moved on and one who needs to move on.This book is not for anyone, but it is for everyone. Sometimes, it is hard to turn the page, but it is always enticing to do so. Almost impossible not to.I highly recommend Beyond the Bayou to anyone who experienced prejudice at any time in his or her life. I also recommend it as a very good read. Its not romantic fiction; its not normal womens fiction. Its special and unique.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 8 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:July 22, 2009
Last year Patti Lacy and her women's fiction debut novel "An Irishwoman's Tale" hit the scene. Her book was one of the first women's fiction books that I really, really enjoyed. In it we met Mary and her friend Sally as Sally gets Mary to open up about her past. I have waited a year to read "What The Bayou Saw" and finally get a look into Sally's past. It has been well worth the wait. "An Irishwoman's Tale" was wonderful, but "What the Bayou Saw" surpassed my expectations! Patti has taken deep issues (that I really don't want to list so as not to spoil anything) and modern circumstances (Katrina's aftermath) and mixed them into a story that will pull you in and make you hold your breath.Sally has moved on and tried to shut out her past until a horrible thing happens to one of her students and it starts bringing the past into the present. Her past full of lies is catching up to her and now she is being prompted to deal with it so she can finally move on... maybe. A beautiful story of wiping the slate clean and moving on in forgiveness.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 9 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:July 11, 2009
This novel qualifies as one that will make an impact in our lives. Reading this historical fiction will cause the reader to reflect on what constitutes friendship and truth.Written in the third person viewpoint of Sally Flowers Stevens, a Southern Belle from New Orleans, Louisiana, who lives and teaches in Illinois, the setting takes the reader from the early 60's up to the days of Hurricane Katrina. During the times when black and white races kept to strictly drawn lines, Sally's childhood best friend was Christella Ward, a black sixth grader. It was during this time that Sally became a proficient lier. One of the themes is what makes women lie, and what could possibly cause a woman to reveal a well-hidden truth. Sally finds telling the truth more difficult than telling the lies that fall effortlessly from her mouth. Lies affect her marriage, her relationships with her two children and her students, and one day her lies affect her job.There are some tough scenes, written with a delicate hand. This is one I heartily recommend.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 10 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:July 7, 2009
Customer Avatar
Tiffany C Kinerson
Patti Lacy's best yet! A captivating childhood that leads to dynamic relationships, a fabulous male character with realistic desires for his wife, imagery that is both mysterious and melodic. Good read. Patti is a no-holds-barred true story-teller.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 11 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:June 30, 2009
Customer Avatar
Sara
Once again, Patti Lacy has managed to capture readers with a memorable story that transcends the limitations of our time and place. This time she brings us on a journey from Normal, Illinois to the 1960s segregated South, to a hurricane-ravaged New Orleans. The impeccable setting descriptions, as well as Lacys use of song and spirituals create a dynamic, cultural feel that deepens both the story and the characters. Though it is an inspirational story, the faith element is very organic and never feels forced. It is a natural part of the plot and the characters, and therefore reveals a real picture of grace and forgiveness. At times the book is raw and real, dealing with sensitive topics such as racism, abuse, deception, and betrayal. Though these are challenging topics, Lacy empathetically handles each of them with grace. In fact, the book subtly encouraged me to look deeper into myself, to think about my own prejudices. Ultimately, What the Bayou Saw is a redemptive narrative about the painful road to healing and wholeness.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 12 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:June 4, 2009
Customer Avatar
Naomi Musch
Patti has a deft touch when it comes to tying the threads of past and present together in this story where long-time prejudices of the deep south cross the mason-Dixon line. I've read, watched, or studied the civil rights movement most of my life. Yet, having grown up about as far from a Louisiana bayou as one can live, I've never really felt the reality of it. But Patti's book struck an emotional core that is the very reason I read historical fiction. It made the time and place real to me. It gave me a more insightful view of what it might have been like to be part of that turbulent period than almost anything I've read before. Getting to know the characters in What the Bayou Saw is a lot like meeting real people. You get to know them gradually. That's because Patti Lacy's characters are skillfully layered, multi-dimensional people, not cut-outs like those in a Lipton cup-a-story. I found that I didn't always like the protagonist(s) in Patti's story, but that was okay. I still cared about them. Again, they were real. Writers who want to create a populace that seems real should study Patti's model, and let the characters grow and develop out of the situations that they find themselves in. In this way the reader comes to know them gently, making judgments, occasionally wrong ones, just as we do with actual people we meet every day. At any rate, a reader would have to be truly hard-hearted not to be touched by this genuinely moving story, and writers would have to be hard-headed not to be inspired by Patti Lacy's skill.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 13 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:May 25, 2009
This is a life changing book. I remember the 60's. I remember having colored classmates and the mixed feeling of friendships with them. The scolding of the older woman in the neighborhood. I remember as a young child living in Washington DC and walking toward a drinking fountain, Mom pulling me back. I couldn't use it because it was for the colored folks. Mom said it wasn't fair for me to use the fountain because the colored people couldn't use the one set aside for the white folks.Once again my friend Patti has written a gripping story. One that gripped my heart, took my breath away and drew me in. The friendship of the Swamp Sisters takes many twists and turns and this story has real take away value.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 14 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:May 23, 2009
Customer Avatar
Deborah Piccurelli
From the moment I started reading What the Bayou Saw by Patti Lacy, I became enthralled. I'd read her first book, An Irishwoman's Tale, and loved it, so I knew I'd love this one, too. The characters and storyline are so painfully real, and Patti captures the true essence of 1960s South. This is a book to sink your teeth into.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 15 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:May 22, 2009
Customer Avatar
Carla
Patti Lacys second novel, What The Bayou Saw, is a compelling, page-turner that recalls the tumultuous past of Sally Stevens, a college professor. When one of her students, a gifted African-American girl, is brutally beaten, Sallys thirty-year-old, hidden memories are stirred. As the layers are peeled back, Sally discovers not only the misdeeds of others, but also a blackness in her own soul that stemmed from an incident with her childhood friend, Ella. Deeply honest, the prose sometimes stings with gritty reality about the prejudices of the Southfrom the swamps of Sallys childhood to Katrina-ravaged New Orleans. This story of faith, the sometimes twisty road to forgiveness, and Gods abundant grace is one I will remember for a long time.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 16 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:May 16, 2009
Customer Avatar
Karen Robbins
In her second novel, Patty Lacy has taken on several difficult subjects and delivered a provocative and engaging story involving the reader emotionally with the complex characters she has created. The haunting cover art immediately hints that this will be a story that will stick with you long after the last words are devoured. While I didn't grow up in the South, I did experience the years of racial conflict from a Midwesterner's point of view. Lacy nails the attitudes of the era as she looks back on the complex relationships of the times. In her character, Sally, Lacy continues a haunting theme as she is affected emotionally and spiritually by what happened in the bayou.For me this was a much anticipated read. I loved Patti Lacy's first book, An Irishwoman's Tale, and expected What The Bayou Saw to be another delicious foray into wonderful prose. I was not disappointed.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 17 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:April 30, 2009
Customer Avatar
Lori
I have heard the saying, "Listen to your child they have much wisdom." Sally Stevens went against her parents and society's racial views in 1963 when she became best friends with an African American. As little girls Ella and Sally secretly played with each other after school. Then one day their friendship changed resulting in a dead body and a blood oath between the two of them to never speak of it again.It was not until one of Sally's students at the local college was attacked, did these suppressed memories of that horrible day begin to surface. Sally lived her life trying to escape her childhood secrets, but the lies began to catch up with her and God had her face them head on.Patti Lacy has become one of my favorite authors. I enjoy the depth of her characters and how her stories challenge me, the reader, to look inside my own heart. I know when I pick up one of her books I will walk away changed for the better.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 18 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:April 28, 2009
Customer Avatar
Tina Ann Forkner, Author
What the Bayou Saw is the most courageous book I have read in years. Patti Lacy's sensitive, but truthful, exploration of race relations is stunning and her examination of the life-long friendship between a Caucasian woman and an African American woman from childhood is lovely. Don't be afraid to delve into this book because of its topic. It is a beautiful portrait of friendship, grace and redemption that will make readers will cheer.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 19 for What the Bayou Saw
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:April 13, 2009
Customer Avatar
<Melanie Dobson
Patti Lacy has poured herself into What the Bayou Saw, and the result is an engrossing and beautifully written novel about secrets, healing, and transformed lives. As her characters struggled to overcome prejudice and lies, I struggled with them, and then I rooted for them as they began to free themselves from their burden of lies. I was captivated by this story!
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.