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Customer Reviews for HarperOne Christianity's Dangerous Idea: The Protestant Revolution- A History From the Sixteenth Century to the Twenty-First

HarperOne Christianity's Dangerous Idea: The Protestant Revolution- A History From the Sixteenth Century to the Twenty-First

"McGrath has the expertise to tell a story stretching from the Reformation's origins in the 16th century to today. The dangerous idea was Luther's: that individual believers could and should read the Bible themselves. The most readable introduction to the history, theology and present-day practices of Protestantism,"---Publishers Weekly. 552 pages, softcover. HarperOne.
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Customer Reviews for Christianity's Dangerous Idea: The Protestant Revolution- A History From the Sixteenth Century to the Twenty-First
Review 1 for Christianity's Dangerous Idea: The Protestant Revolution- A History From the Sixteenth Century to the Twenty-First
This review is fromChristianity's Dangerous Idea: The Protestant Revolution-A History from the Sixteenth Century to the Twenty-First.
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Date:February 26, 2008
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John Painter
For twenty-five years I've been studying the topic of, "What the Christian Church is, and How it Got That Way." This book by McGrath fills in a lot of those details. It is a history, par excellence, of the Protestant Church.Some fundamental principles of the changes from Roman Catholicism to Protestantism are found in McGrath's historical details. One such was the replacement of the Catholic altar by the Protestant pulpit. This expressed the theological change from mystically and directly encountering God through the sacraments to finding Him indirectly through Bible preaching.This book leads one to realize that the progress and development of Protestantism has been focused in the United States since the 1600s. The later Pentecostal and Charismatic phases were born here. McGrath finishes up this fine work in projecting the future of Protestantsim along what he sees as an irreversable path throughout the world.
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