Christianbook.com Ratings and Reviews

Customer Reviews for Crossway Books & Bibles Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes

Crossway Books & Bibles Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes

It's hard to overestimate the importance of the family, and that of fathers in particular. We've heard it said, "As the family goes, so goes the nation." But it can also be said that "as the father goes, so goes the family." Consequently, Voddie Baucham has set out to teach men how to faithfully shepherd their families.

Derived from Baucham's monthly meetings with men in his church, Family Shepherds calls men to accountability for their God-given responsibilities in their homes. Baucham's clear style and practical approach will spur men to protect their marriage, raise kingdom-minded children, value the synergy between church and home, and navigate difficult family dynamics.

Family Shepherds is a book for any husband or father looking to lead well, and it will serve as an excellent resource for churches looking to equip the men in their congregations.
Average Customer Rating:
4.8 out of 5
4.8
 out of 
5
(10 Reviews) 10
Open Ratings Snapshot
Rating Snapshot (10 reviews)
5 stars
8
4 stars
2
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
0
9 out of 1090%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes
Review 1 for Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

I highly recommend

Date:November 12, 2013
Customer Avatar
Elizabeth
Location:Virginia
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I highly recommend this book to parents of boys! Even to a new believer in Christ who has a family or will be starting one.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 2 for Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:November 9, 2012
Customer Avatar
Rohr
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Great book! It didn't make it to me really fast, but I like it.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 3 for Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A must read for any man

Date:April 23, 2012
Customer Avatar
TheToddLynn
Location:Roanoke, VA
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I chose to review this book for a couple reasons. First, I heard a message by Voddie Baucham speaking at Passion One Day from the 90’s that was inspiring and so when I saw he had written a book, I knew I wanted to read it. Second, a couple of my friends, Matt and Carolina Price, mentioned another book of his which caused me to look for other books by him. Thus, when I came across Family Shepherds, I knew I wanted to read it. I am extremely satisfied and happy that I did in fact get this book. It was both challenging and inspiring as I strive to be the leader, husband and father that God has called me to be.
The back has this to say about the book:
“It’s hard to overestimate the importance of the family and that of father’s in particular. We’ve heard it said, ‘As the family goes, so goes the nation.’ But it can also be said that ‘as the father goes, so goes the family.’”
As a youth pastor, I could not agree more with this statement. As I view families in public, it is extremely easy to notice families that have disconnected fathers and those who have non-existent fathers as well. We question why the country is going the way that it is but all we need to do is look at how men are beginning to act. You see it from celebrity fathers all the way down to “regular” fathers. Men are not taking responsibility to raise their own children; and then they wonder why their kids eventually take a turn for the worse at some point in their lives.
God has given men the position of leadership and it is in our nature to lead in one way or another. The sad thing is that most men are leading in a negative manner. Multiple studies have been done by both Christian and secular groups and they are finding overwhelming evidence of the impact that fathers have on their children. Voddie does not just present the evidence but goes in depth with ways that will challenge men to lead well and become a true man of God.
Family Shepherds is divided into 5 parts: 1. The need to equip family shepherds, 2. Family discipleship and evangelism, 3. Marriage enrichment, 4. The training and discipline of children, 5. Lifestyle evaluation.
Each section is filled with Scripture to back up his points and written extremely well to inspire any professing Christian man to step up because the church and the world need us to. However, one of the most challenging parts of this book was how Voddie constantly challenged men with knowing what they believe. No man can truly lead his family in a God honoring manner without being a student of the Word; it is not possible. For us to be Godly men and leaders, we have to be men of God’s Word, who study, read, and love it. Apart from God’s Word, it is impossible to be a Godly leader. Yes some men might become good fathers and husbands and men, but only God can lead men to become great fathers, husbands and men. We need to be able to pick out false teachings on raising children and being men. The world is constantly coming out with self-help books and “instruction manuals” that have some pretty good advice, and even when put next to God’s Word, it is hard to pick out the lies from the truth. That is why we need to be men of the Word if we are to lead our families to become disciples of Christ, so we can pick out the stuff that misses the mark of the inerrant Word of God.
This book greatly challenged me in how I am going about leading my family? How am I leading my wife and daughter into a closer walk with the Lord? Or am I going about my life just hoping they grow closer to the Lord? As men we are to lead. If we are not leading as we should, there is not much of a hopeful future. I sincerely challenge any man, whether you are a husband and father yet does not matter, to get this book. You will come away challenged and inspired to be, first off, a devoted follower of Christ and second, the leader God intended us men to be.
I received a complimentary copy of this book from Crossway in exchange for this review.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 4 for Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Good, sound book on parenting

Date:February 20, 2012
Customer Avatar
Eric Smith
Location:Rochester, NY
Age:45-54
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
I am going to admit that i am biased towards this author; I've listened to many of his messages and am blessed by the way he is very Biblical in his approach. This book is no different, pointing men to be shepherds of their home the way the Bible tells them. Be warned, though; the stark reality of how most men in America raise their children as believers is exposed in this book. We have become so unbiblical in our approach that many of the teachings here may seem foreign or offensive. Other reviews of the book go into much more detail, so I will not repeat what others have already written more eloquently than I could, but I will say that this book will direct you to see your role as father in a Biblical light. My only negative is that the book could've been longer, going into more depth into more of the teachings. Knowing the methodical, logical way Voddie teaches, this would probably make this book not as concise and to the point, but as believers, we need to get our minds and hearts away from the "instant" teaching of God's word and learn to slowly eat spiritual meat. Having said that, please pick up this book to start you on a path of shepherding your family and examining your role in light of scripture.
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
Review 5 for Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

The Need for Family Shepherds

Date:February 19, 2012
Customer Avatar
Paul Emery
Location:Magnolia, TX
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I usually select books that interest me to review for the various publishers. I figure if I am going to take the time to read a book then it should be something that can give me some practical guidance for where I am at in my life. Family Shepherds falls well within this category. As a husband and father of five I am always trying to see the best way to serve and to lead my family in the path of righteousness and to deepen their love for our LORD and Savior Jesus Christ.
Deuteronomy 6:4-9 is a passage that every father/family shepherd should know, for in it we see the very foundation of why we should be the family shepherd.
Hear, O Israel: The LORD our God, the LORD is one. You shall love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all you soul and with all your might. And these words that I command you today shall be on your heart. You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise. You shall bind them as a sign on your hand, and they shall be as frontlets between your eyes. You shall write them on the doorposts of you house and on your gates. (Englsih Standard Version 2001)
One of the key words in this passage is the word “command”. God did not ask us to teach our children, He commanded that we do so. It is with this premise that Dr. Baucham begins to write Family Shepherds. In Family Shepherds Dr. Baucham breaks the roles of the Family Shepherd into four key areas. These four key areas break down like this; first, family discipleship and evangelism; second, marriage enrichment; third, the training and discipline of children; and finally, the need for lifestyle evaluation. Since my job is to get you interested in the book we are only going to take a look at a couple of these areas momentarily, and then you’ll have to read the rest.
I write out this key passage from Deuteronomy not just to challenge you, but to challenge myself. This is how I felt as I began to read this newest book from Voddie. How am I doing in discipleship and evangelism? Is my marriage stronger now than it was ten years ago? Am I training my children as I ought, teaching them the need of salvation for the deliverance of their sin, or am I teaching behavioral/morality changes without the necessary authority and need of Christ as LORD of their lives? Dr. Baucham quotes Charles Hodge, a well known theologian in the mid-nineteenth century (Baucham, Voddie 2011) who said: “The character of the Church and of the state depends on the character of the family. If religion dies out in the family, it cannot elsewhere be maintained.” (Hodge 1871) If fathers are not doing the job God entrusted them with, then we are only leading to our own demise.
In his section on Family Discipleship and Evangelism Dr. Baucham discusses the benefit and purpose of having a family catechism. The idea of a catechism has been part of the Church for probably centuries, and was used by Catholic and Protestant Theologians alike. To be honest when I first saw this chapter on catechism I was about ready to skip it. However, I decided to read it because I was curious about what Dr. Baucham’s thoughts where on this idea.
First, for those who maybe aren’t familiar with the term catechism let me first use Dr. Baucham’s explanation. “It is simply a pedagogical method employing questions and answers to teach a set body of knowledge. Ultimately, it is a means of teaching Christian doctrine in a concise, repetitive manner. (Baucham, Voddie 2011) Although a very foreign concept in today’s modern day Protestants the catechism was used by great Protestant theologians such as Martin Luther and Jonathan Edwards. I am blessed to have in my possession a copy of Luther’s small catechism that belonged to my father. My wife and I are in discussion in to implementing a catechism in our house thanks to this section of Family Shepherds.
Another powerful section of Family Shepherds is the section on the training and discipline of children. This is a very hotly contested area especially in light of the post-modern day view of “love and tolerance”. So often we hear people say we shouldn’t judge, we need to let our children make their own decisions, so forth and so forth. To the secular world the very idea of a “family shepherd” is counter-intuitive, yet as we see crime rates grow, never has something been more important than the role of fathers raising their children.
In Christianity there are two authors who have addressed the specific topic of discipline and training of children; Michael Pearl and his book To Train a Child and Tedd Tripp and his book Shepherding a Child’s Heart. Again I own a copy of both of these books so when I came to chapter 10 I came to it with an understanding of both of the trains of thought represented by these two authors. Between these two authors there is a major difference that I noticed as did Voddie. First Michael Pearl has the philosophy that “training doesn’t necessarily require that the trainee has reason; even mice and rats can be trained to respond to stimuli.” (Pearl 1994) However, Tedd Tripp starts off his book this way, “The Scripture teaches that the heart is the control center for life.” (Tripp 1995)
One doesn’t have to look very far to spot the vast difference between these two authors. Michael Pearl believes you can teach behavior through stimuli while Tedd Tripp points to the fact that the heart is the control center of a person’s life which means to train them up you must address the heart. In Family Shepherds Dr. Baucham says this, “We must have a grasp on our children’s greatest need if we ever hope to see it met.” (Baucham, Voddie 2011) I would be lying to say that this did not strike me right between the eyes. So often when I train or discipline my children, I’m not focusing on the control center of their lives, their hearts, I’m focusing on what makes me happy.
If we as fathers are only focusing on behavior or morals, then we do not love our children as Christ loved us. If we are focusing on behavior or morals then we are not training up our children to love the LORD with all of their heart and all their soul and all their might. Jeremiah 17:9 tells us that “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately sick; who can understand it?” (Englsih Standard Version 2001) Matthew 12:34 says, “You brood of vipers! How can you speak good, when you are evil? For out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks.” (Englsih Standard Version 2001) If we as fathers do not address the heart of our children, and strive to lead them to saving faith in Jesus Christ, then we are shepherds who have failed. Dr. Baucham quotes the great Puritan preacher Jonathan Edwards (Baucham, Voddie 2011) who said, “How few are there who are thorough in maintaining order and government in their families! How is family-government in a great measure vanished! And how many are as likely to bring a curse upon their families, as Eli.” (Edwards 1835)
Dr. Baucham is a huge proponent of the age-integrated congregation. What this means is that his Church does not practice such things as nursery, children’s church, youth group, or even Men or Women’s Bible studies, although they do have a monthly Men’s meeting. I do not agree with Dr. Baucham on this of course, and in fact want to point out what I see as a slight contradiction in his book. First, he says this:
Virtually all the debate over the discipleship of young people begins with the assumption that church structures and programs such as the nursery, children’s church, Sunday school, and youth group are foundational discipleship tools and whatever happens must take place within that framework. (Baucham, Voddie 2011)
I disagree with this assumption, and would in fact argue that these programs and church structures are helpful, and can serve as a supplemental, not a foundational discipleship tool. More so I believe that Dr. Baucham contradicts himself only three pages later when he says, “We do not rely either on the pulpit or on the home. Both institutions are charged to play their role.” (Baucham, Voddie 2011) This being said however, I do find this to be a book that every Church leader, father, mother, and Church staff should read. I agree with the premise that discipleship ultimately rests in the home. As one looks at the direction society is taking there is no doubt in my mind that it is time for the father to be his family’s shepherd.
From where I stand, even though I may not agree with everything that Dr. Voddie Baucham believes I still see this book as a must read, and gladly rate it 5 out of 5. I’m honored to have added this book to my library and look forward to reading through it again and again as Dr. Baucham helps teach me and all men how to be Family Shepherds.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Crossway as part of their Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
Works Cited
Baucham, Voddie. Family Shepherds. Wheaton: Crossway, 2011.
Edwards, Jonathan. "Christian Cautions: or, The Necessity of Self-Examination." In The Works of Jonathan Edwards, 1:183. New York: Daniel Appleton and Co., 1835.
Englsih Standard Version. Crossway Bibles, 2001.
Hodge, Charles. Systematic Theology. Vol. 3. New York: C. Scribner, 1871.
Pearl, Michael. To Train Up a Child. Pleasantville: NGJ Ministries, 1994.
Tripp, Tedd. Shepherding a Child's Heart. Wapwallopen: Shpherd Press, 1995.
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
Review 6 for Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Men, shepherd your families

Date:February 17, 2012
Customer Avatar
The Reformed Reader
Location:Louisville
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Whose responsibility is it to lead your family? Some put this responsibility upon the role of the pastor/youth pastor; others put this responsibility onto programs at their church. Baucham calls men to return to their responsibility of being Shepherd leaders of their homes. Baucham offers a three tier approach to those who play a key role in the discipleship of a believer. The first tier is godly mature men and women in the church. Men and women like this are needed and are an important tool in the discipleship process. The second tier is that of godly elders. Godly elders are needed in order to model to families what Christ centered living looks like. Finally, the last tier or leg of the chair is biblical functioning homes. In Titus 1:10-11 Paul speaks of empty talkers and deceivers coming into the church and effecting whole families. Here Paul calls for Godly homes to protect and shepherd their families. All three tiers are an important play an important role in discipling and shepherding believers. This shepherding is not the responsibility of the pastors alone. Next, Baucham establishes explains several tools that are necessary for parents to make sure that Christ is being made much of at home. Baucham’s list of Christ-exalting tools includes: family worship, catechism, apologetics, and personal evangelism. Baucham then further breaks this down to giving more direct applications of this principle. The father is responsible for preaching the gospel regularly within your home. Family shepherds do more than lead their children. Family shepherds give a picture of the gospel to their children through displaying love to their spouse. The marriage relationship needs to reflect the fact that the children do not define the marriage, but the relationship between the couple does. The marriage relationship is primary and children secondary. Living out this type of marriage before your children will give them a beautiful picture of the gospel. Next, Baucham discusses different forms of discipline which need to be practiced in the home. Baucham concludes the book with a helpful practical application section.
I thoroughly enjoyed Baucham’s book. The concepts contained within the book are of urgent need within the church. Men need to start shepherding their families. Additionally, couples need to return to the idea that the marriage is ultimate and not the children. The modern western church is plagued with families that put the responsibility for discipleship upon churches and ministers. Although both groups play an integral part in the discipleship process, the family is the place where discipleship must first occur. Men, you are responsible for your family. Shepherd them to the great shepherd. Lead your family to the water, where they will never thirst again.
~The Reformed Reader~
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 7 for Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Gospel-centered manual for men

Date:February 10, 2012
Customer Avatar
Dave Jenkins
Location:Caldwell, Idaho
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
The old saying, "As the family goes, so goes the nation" is true now more than ever. While this phrase is important, Dr. Voddie Bauchman argues that "as the father goes, so goes the family." Pastor Bauchman wrote this book to help teach men how to faithfully shepherd their families, and to call men to accountability for their God-given responsibilities in their home.
Family Shepherds is a very helpful book that was derived from material Pastor Bauchman taught at monthly meetings with the men at Grace Family Baptist Church where he Pastors. This book is designed to help any husband or father lead their families well, and will serve as an excellent resource for churches looking to equip men in their congregations.
In a society that continues to devalue men and tell them how unimportant they are, I appreciate Dr. Bauchman's call in this book for men to be leaders in their home. In part one, Pastor Bauchman explains the need to equip family shepherds by emphasizing a biblical view of the family. The approach to this type of ministry Dr. Bauchman argues for are what he calls "a three-legged stool" of discipleship. The first stool is godly, mature men and women in the church; 2) godly, manly pastors and elders; and finally biblically functioning homes (Bauchman, 28).
In part two Dr. Bauchman focuses on family discipleship and evangelism and what it means for men to be priests and prophets in their home. Here he teaches on heralding the Gospel at home, catechism, Christian education and family worship. Part three explains the purpose, and primacy of marriage, and male headship in the home. Part four of the book focuses on training and discipline of children. In the final section of the book Dr. Bauchman teaches on lifestyle evaluation; how men are to count the cost of family discipleship by understanding church membership, how they use our time and their dual citizenship.
The greatest strength of this book is Pastor Bauchman firm commitment to the Word of God and the Gospel. The other aspect of this book that most readers will appreciate is how the author deals with objections to family oriented ministry. The author engages those who disagree with him in an agreeable way not to beat down his opponent, but to show them what the Scriptures teach. Speaking the Truth in love is sorely needed in the Church, and I could not help but note how good of a job Pastor Bauchman did in pointing his readers to the Word of God and the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ. The final strength of this book is the chapter on "Heralding the Gospel at home" where Pastor Bauchman lays out what the Gospel is, and what the Gospel demands from men today.
Family Shepherds should be required reading for every Pastor and any church with any men or any desire to reach men with the Gospel. Reading this book challenged me to shepherd my wife better with the Gospel. Family Shepherds is big on the Gospel, but also applies its teaching by giving practical insight on how Christian men can lead their wives and children. I recommend every Pastor, every ministry leader and every man read Family Shepherds in order to learn how the Gospel should affect every area of your leadership in the home.
Title: Family Shepherds
Author: Voddie Bauchman
Publisher: Crossway (2011)
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Crossway as part of their Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
Review 8 for Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great Book, for ANYONE in a leading position

Date:January 3, 2012
Customer Avatar
MOAFO8
Location:Medford, Or
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
One of the things missing in churches today is teachings on how to be the parent God calls us to be. How to lead the little sheep we are given care of. Sure pastors tell us what we need to be, but they don’t often teach how to be that. The new book “Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes” By Voddie Baucham Jr tells you what you need to know by a pastor that actually leads classes on the subject! Though it is applied more to father’s even I learned quite a bit through reading it.
We parents really have a hard job ahead of us to raise not only responsible adults, but God Fearing responsible adults. When our churches don’t always back us up, it’s scary! A lot of churches now days even take over the training of our kids. Think about it.. where are your children on Sunday Morning? Do you even know what they are learning?
I never realized before reading this book, just how much we miss out on when we step through the church doors and send our kids off to separate areas of the church.I used to think that parents that kept their kids in church with them were slightly crazy! Now I understand their reasoning completely… and agree!
When did it become the church’s responsibility to train our children? I remember our church used to even send home packets of things that we “should” teach our kids through the week so they were ready for the next weeks Sunday school lesson. It took us months at one church to realize that all our kids were doing in Kid’s class were watching Veggie Tales and playing video games! I don’t think churches even realize what they are doing… as time goes by the teaching of the kids just seems to be more and more the church’s responsibility as parents step back and let it happen.
Then we wonder why our kids lose interest in Christianity when they become too old for Children’s class and there is no more fun… just sitting and listening. We don’t train them to be ready for that!
It was embarrassing for me to admit that while I don’t trust someone else to teach my kids mathematics and science… I have no problem sending them off to someone else to learn about God. I am not saying that we don’t do family devotions… it’s an integral part of our school work. But reading a Bible passage and saying a prayer is NOT learning about WHO God is and how He can be a personal part of our lives.
There is a lot more in this book that is eye opening and really made me stop and think. But what I got most out of it, was that it is NOT the church’s job to train my children. It is Hubs and mine. WE can no longer sit idly by waiting for someone else to do our job for us.
This book includes everything from WHY men need to reclaim their families, to how they can, family discipleship and evangelism, enriching your marriage and why your marriage is an important part of raising children and not just for the obvious reasons, how and why to train and discipline your children and evaluating your lifestyle.
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
Review 9 for Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Men, pick up this book

Date:December 29, 2011
Customer Avatar
Chris Land
Location:Wichita Falls, Tx
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
The family is the first institution that God established during Creation. Not the temple, the Old Testament sacrificial system, nor the church, the family. God has called the men of the family to be the spiritual leaders of their families, but not many men are taking that role very seriously. If there was anyone who needed to address this issue of the men taking their role as the spiritual leader of their family it's Voddie Baucham.
In his latest book, Family Shepherds, Voddie Baucham deals with the call that God has given men to be the shepherd for their family. This books talks about the Bible's role as the family's role in discipleship, bringing the gospel home, enriching their marriage, how to disciple children in the home, and counting the cost for family discipleship.
There were a couple of chapters that stuck to me in this book. The first one was heralding the gospel at home (chapter 4), which was a chapter on the gospel. An eleven page chapter on what the gospel is, what it is not, and the theology surrounding the gospel. When I read that chapter, I felt like street witnessing, much less bring the gospel home. Voddie can have that affect. The other chapter was on church membership (chapter 13). Voddie talks about how church membership is important for all believers. As leaders in their homes, men are to part of the church.
One important note that I commend Voddie on is at the end of the book, he dealt with fatherless families, which is important considering how many single mother families there are in our society. Voddie even discussed what the church's responsibility to those families who do not have a father to lead them.
This book was easy to read and great for all men and church leaders to read. This is a great book for youth pastors to get in the hands of fathers of teenagers. Voddie pulls no punches, which he never does, and the book is an easy read.
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
Review 10 for Family Shepherds: Calling and Equipping Men to Lead Their Homes
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

A fairly solid book...

Date:December 7, 2011
Customer Avatar
The Lorax
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
The entirety of this book is devoted to showing men how they can better lead their families spiritually. One crucial passage that Pastor Baucham points out repeatedly is Ephesians 6:1-4, the end of which reads “Fathers…bring them [your children] up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord.” He then goes on to say: “It is fathers – not youth ministers, children’s ministers, or preschool ministers – who are charged with this duty of discipling the next generation.” Powerful stuff indeed. We men have been charged with a high calling by the Scriptures and therefore we must be found faithful to that calling (note that I said “faithful,” not perfect).
Ranging through a number of topics, including the breakdown of the family, the way that churches often divide upon generational lines, the shattering of home life into a place where “they share an address and a last name, but they don’t share life”, to speaking directly towards a man’s marriage and how he disciplines his children, I found this book to be an extremely helpful read which was quite Biblical, though not without the odd disagreement in application here or there.
On chapter that I found especially helpful was “The Purpose of Marriage,” near the end of which Pastor Baucham points out that God uses our marriages to progressively mature and sanctify us: “One of the tools he’s [God] using in this process is your wife. You’re impatient, so he gave you a woman who’s very different than you are in order to work patience in you. You’re selfish, so he gave you a woman who needs and depends upon you.” If only more and more folks could see this truth in their marriages: it’s not always about smooth sailing, but instead it’s about God working in us, sometimes in ways we’d rather He not, but always for our own good and His eternal glory.
Another topic that the author nails dead center concerns the role distinctions between men and women. This is a much argued and disagreed upon point, and yet we do see Scriptural support for the man taking leadership in the home. However, Pastor Baucham helpfully points out that this is often misunderstood to be some sort of distinction in quality, character, or worth (which it is not) as opposed to a distinction in responsibility: “In the partnership of two spiritually equal human beings…the man bears the primary responsibility to lead the partnership in a God-glorifying direction (requoted from Ray Ortlund).”
All of these wonderful points said, the book is not without its flaws, though they are few and far between. Though I did not find any big picture concepts that I disagreed with, there were a handful of occasions in which the author seemed to be pushing his supporting points a bit past what they actually proved. Pastor Baucham spends a great deal of time trying to show the proliferation of what he terms “Pelagian” parenting books, i.e. books that only address behavioral issues rather than spiritual ones. While this is certainly a present danger, a few of the quotations that Baucham gives don’t seem to support his points very well, if at all, especially his rant on a popular parenting book by Michael Pearl, where the quote that Baucham offers on p.118 doesn’t appear to back up his argument. I am not defending Michael Pearl or his works, but at the same time I didn’t see that Baucham offered an accurate explanation of those he criticized either even though his larger points are certainly accurate. Thus I would caution the reader to take the comparisons that Baucham offers with a grain of salt and to always read carefully.
Another area that readers may want to be aware of is the chapter on “Corrective Discipline.” Opinions will vary across Christianity – some will read this chapter and want to throw the book across the room, otherwise will stand and cheer. In either case, Baucham is well worth reading here for the challenge that he gives for his side of the debate which should spur the reader towards their own Biblical thinking, whether they find themselves in agreement or in opposition.
These thoughts aside, Baucham’s book is a quick read that I would recommend for those who will take the time to study it carefully, applying what is good and Biblically-sound while setting aside some of the more extreme examples. My prayer is that it will help many Christian men to understand the task that is laid before them and to seek the Lord for it’s accomplishment.
(In the interest of full disclosure, I want to note that the publisher of this book, Crossway, provided it at no cost to me as a review sample. That said, my review is in no way influenced or controlled by them and thus I give my review of this book with honesty and integrity and have received no compensation for this review)
+2points
2of 2voted this as helpful.