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Customer Reviews for Shepherd Press Broken-Down House: Living Productively in a World Gone Bad

Shepherd Press Broken-Down House: Living Productively in a World Gone Bad

Sin has ravaged the house that God created. This world sits slumped, disheveled, and in pain, groaning for the restoration that can only be accomplished by the hands of him who built it in the first place. The bad news is that you and I are living right in the middle of the restoration process. The good news is that the divine Builder will not relent until everything about his house is made totally new again. Emmanuel lives here with us, and he is at work returning his house to its former beauty.

Someday you will live forever in a fully restored house, but right now you are called to live with peace, joy, and productivity in a place damaged by sin. How can you be an active part of the restoration at the heart of God's plan? The book in your hands will teach you to live productively in the here and now

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Customer Reviews for Broken-Down House: Living Productively in a World Gone Bad
Review 1 for Broken-Down House: Living Productively in a World Gone Bad
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

The truth about life

Date:August 8, 2011
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Anne
Location:Baltimore, MD
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I started reading Broken-Down House by Paul David Tripp in late May. It is now August! Although I can read many books in a day, some books need to be read over time. This is one of those books. I find that I need to read it a chapter at a time and let it sink in.
Paul David Tripp begins with this wonderful quote early in the book,
"The Bible is not a higher-plane tome about some mystical life of spiritual devotion. It does not teach blissful separation from the brokenness of everyday life. No, the Bible is a book about this world. It is a gritty, honest book. When we read Scripture, we face the world as it actually is, in big-screen, high-def details. God doesn't pull any punches. He doesn't paint over any cracks. he doesn't flatter or avoid. There is no denial of what is real and true." p. 26
Tripp explains that we live in a broken-down house that is in the process of being restored. Our world is a broken-down house and so are we. This metaphor was very vivid to me when he reminded me of what it's like when you're remodeling a house. It's messy, dusty, and often chaotic. Things are out of place until they get fixed and everything's put back. But, when there's repairs that need to be done, you can either put them off or fix them! And if you don't fix them--they only get worse. So, how do we cope with this mess and chaos while fixing the house?
That's what this book is about. First, Tripp talks about what we need to know to see this world and ourselves rightly. The second part addresses what we can do. This book is meaty and has so much solid truth in it. It is difficult to distill all of the important ideas I have in this book into one paragraph.
I thought I would just touch on one chapter I read this week. This week I felt particularly convicted by the chapter about eternity. It began with a powerful story of a woman losing every material thing that mattered to her in this world. She learns some very hard lessons and realizes that her hope was in the things of this world and not in eternity. She also faces some hard truths about herself. Tripp shares that after all that she had gone through she realized that no one was ever good enough for her. Her expectations for all in her life, including herself, couldn't be met because her hope had been placed in being perfect and in this world. Questions followed that asked the reader, in this case me, to reflect--am I expecting too much of the people in my life? Am I expecting them to do things they were never designed to do? Where is my hope really being placed? What makes a week good? (This question implies that what makes our week "good" may not be what should make it good.)
This book is helping me process some issues I've seen in the world and have struggled through this year. I know this is one of those books that I'll dog ear and underline. I'll come back to the book shelf year after year to remember and be challenged to put my life and the world around me in the right perspective. I need to remember to keep my eyes on eternity and God's glory and not on myself and this world. I need to live in this world and love people well, but not get broken down by the yuckiness of this world. I hope this book will encourage many people as it has me. It's like drinking a glass of water when you're parched. Soda doesn't really cut it, because water is what you've really been needing.
If you're struggling as I have with the yuckiness of this world and how to cope with it...or if you're struggling with how to help your children cope with how to live in this world and not be of it...I highly recommend this book! I hope your heart and mind will be deeply encouraged by it as I have been.
Please note that I received a complimentary copy of this book for review from Shepherd Press.
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Review 2 for Broken-Down House: Living Productively in a World Gone Bad
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:October 20, 2009
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Rev. Doyle Peyton
A good book for bruised believers from a Christian counselor's perspective. A practical outworking of the true meaning of grace in the lives of Christians in a fallen world.
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