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Customer Reviews for Thomas Nelson Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice

Thomas Nelson Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice

A beautiful literary tribute to the poet, martyr, expatriate, outlaw, and original translator of the English Bible. In this personable, historical narrative, Teems brings wit and wisdom to the story of the English "Paul" who defied a tyrannical church in order to introduce God's Word to the common people. 304 pages, softcover from Nelson.
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Customer Reviews for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Review 1 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

read it now!

Date:September 9, 2012
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Archie Isib
Location:Ph
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"While Tyndale would have to learn Hebrew in Germany due to England's active Edict of Expulsion against the Jews, he works promininently into an age where Greek was available to the European scholarly community for the first time in centuries. Erasmus compiled and edited Greek Scriptures into the Textus Receptus--ironically, to improve upon the Latin Vulgate--following the Renaissance-fueling Fall of Constantinople in 1453 and the dispersion of Greek-speaking intellectuals and texts into a Europe which previously had access to none." I knew that he had translated some of the Bible from Latin to English, but I didn't know how much he had done with a target on his back. This was an inspiring and convicting read at the same time. We owe a great debt to William Tyndale! I learned a great deal about Tyndale and those around him and the controversy surrounding the translation of the Bible into the English language. Read this ad get ready to amazed-- cared a lot for you Bible. You have to read this now!
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Review 2 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Well written

Date:May 25, 2012
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Logan
Location:New Zealand
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5 out of 5
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I never knew much about this influential man, even as Teem's confesses he is often just a 'ghost of a man' when it comes to biographic information. So it is difficult to build up a true picture of Tyndale who left a permanent indelible mark upon English speaking Christians. His translation of the Bible into English has served as the foundation on which other translations seek to build. Even the venerable King James Bible owes much to Tyndale from the century prior.
So this is the man that this book seeks to biography. Teems seems to meander around behind Tyndale, turning over the loose rocks or peering through the bushes as he seeks to build up the fullest possible picture of the man. The narrative looks to those around Tyndale, to understand his associates and opponents is to understand something of him.
It makes for a fulfilling and interesting read and is certainly not a dry intellectual account, although Teems has plenty of research to call on no doubt.
I received the book through BookSneeze.
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Review 3 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Best Book I've ever read!!!

Date:April 7, 2012
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RayF
Location:Ohio
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I recently read Tyndale by David Teems, and I can't say enough about this book. Mr. Teems gives a brief background of Wycliffe and a few others, setting up for the story of William Tyndale. It is a masterful work, I couldn't put this book down. All the trials and persecutions that these men went through to give us the Bible that we use today, gave me a new appreciation for my Bible and I hope I never again take for granted the sacrifices that were made to have the scripture in English today. To God be the Glory!!!!!!!!!
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Review 4 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Brilliant book on Tyndale & the Reformation

Date:April 5, 2012
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Annie Kate
Location:Canada
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You may know the story of Tyndale, a man consumed by the goal to translate the Bible so every English plough boy could read it, a man hunted as a heretic and eventually martyred for his work.
Tyndale by David Teems does not focus on this story, but rather tells the tale of his work, his world, and his influence on the English language. With extensive research and numerous excerpts from the writings of Tyndale and others, Teems shows how Tyndale was shaped by the Word, not by the violent and crude world around him. He shows how Tyndale’s translation of the Bible, echoed in the King James Version, formed the basis of modern English, deeply influencing Shakespeare and all who followed. And he explains Tyndale’s beliefs, expressed in his books as well as in his Bible notes.
This is a brilliant book, illuminating the Reformation era as much as Tyndale’s life. I expected to learn about Tyndale when I picked up this book. I also learned about the English language, Sir Thomas More, everyday assumptions of the day, and serving God—the quotes from Tyndale abound with insight on serving God.
Teems is unlike his subject, though. His language is high flown and occasionally bombastic. His assumptions and comments show a man who seems, to me, to stand aside from rather than beside Tyndale.
If you are looking for a story about Tyndale, you will need to look elsewhere. If, however, you’re looking for a careful analysis of his work, personality, language use, and times, this book will be a joy, except where the author intrudes. Recommended for older teens and adults.
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Review 5 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Martyr for the Bible

Date:March 8, 2012
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McDawg81
Location:Flowery Branch, GA
Age:55-65
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5 out of 5
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History has done a poor job with the memories and accomplishments of William Tyndale. David Teems has set out to make a correction to this egregious error.
It is through the work of William Tyndale that we have the framework of our English language as we know it today. Reading the prologue is beneficial as you will learn something about our idioms and you will acquire a better picture of the setting in which William Tyndale undertook this major task.
William Tyndale was a graduate of Oxford University and possessed a love for the scriptures which became his driving motivation for his most important life mission – translating the scriptures from the Latin, Greek, and original Hebrew. This task would prove to be perilous, as it was in conflict with the teachings of the Roman Catholic Church. As such, Tyndale would be branded an heretic. He had to constantly hide his work as it was considered blasphemous by the Church and, when found, were confiscated and burned. Undeterred, he persisted in his work to create an English speaking God and make the Bible available to all.
For all of his work, Tyndale was finally apprehended and was executed on October 6, 1536.
David Teems has done a great service through his dedicated research published in this book. For anyone who truly wants to understand the value we have in the blessed book we sometimes treat so carelessly, you should put this book on the top of your reading list. Tyndale was not alone as a martyr for his work on translations of the original texts, but he probably did more to birth some of the English phrases in the original KJV text than any other man.
This book receives my highest recommendation!
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through their bloggers review program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Review 6 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

A good look into Tyndale's life

Date:February 23, 2012
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Val Frania
Location:Wausau, WI
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Tyndale by David Teems wasn't an easy book to read, but nonetheless, I am very glad I took the time to read it. Though not much is known about Willian Tyndale, the author was able to piece together a pretty good picture through his research into other men's lives who were his contemporaries.
Tyndale was a Bible translator during the time of Henry VIII, Thomas Moore and Martin Luther, in the early 1500's. His mission in life placed him in the category of "heretic" by the Catholic church because he went against the popular thought that the Word of God should be left in it's original language, readable only by the church leaders at the time. It was his contention that everyone ought to have a copy of the Bible in their own language and he targeted the ploughboy, the one considered the least educated at the time.
His books, whether it be the ones he wrote to refute the popular beliefs of the day, or his translation of the New Testament itself, were subject to burning if confiscated by the religious authorities of the Catholic church who controlled almost every part of English life. I was amazed at what length Tyndale went to in order to get the Truth out, including working in secret, in exile, and threat of death by burning.
I was also intrigued while reading about Henry VIII, Thomas Moore, Martin Luther, etc. I knew Thomas Moore wrote Utopia, but was unfamiliar with his crusade against Tyndale and his work in translating the Word. Moore was quite ruthless and made it his mission to discredit the men involved in the reformation. He especially hated Luther and Tyndale, though he treated Luther with a vehement hatred that spilled over into his language, as did Luther's when answering Moore's criticisms. I was quite surprised at the vulgar way in which they argued, yet when it came to Thomas Moore's description of Tyndale and his accusations of heresy toward the translator, Moore toned down his language toward the man out of his awe for Tyndale's well known personal Christian testimnony and reputation. This in itself convinced me of Tyndale's desire to serve God in all circumstances and persecutions, for if your enemies treat you with respect, obviously there had to be an obvious walk with God seen by those around you. Tyndale is historically described as an honest and trustworthy man, who in his daily living reflected Christ in every area.
In the end when he was betrayed by who the thought was a friend and eventually strangled and burned, he was able to maintain his faith and a peaceful calm that could only have come from God Himself. I would recommend this book to anyone who would like to learn more about Tyndale and those who lived around him. It created a better understanding of the hardships men suffered to bring us the Word of God in the English language.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through BookSneeze(R).com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255.
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Review 7 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Tyndale

Date:February 13, 2012
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LyonsLady
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Tyndale The man who Gave God an English Voice
written by David Teems
The year was 1526...think on that...This was when the Catholic church controlled (and stills does) almost all, in every way.
Including the access to the Very Word of GOD...and they would do anything to keep it that way !!!
Then steps in this very gifted man named William Tyndale, who dared to translate the very Word of GOD into English.
He did so in secret,in exile,in peril and always on the move...this is how the Reformation officially reached English shores...
and what it cost the men who brought it there...
William Tyndale was the one who gave us the King James Version of the Word of GOD...
I choose to review this book because I wanted something different to read and I have always enjoyed the King James Version above the other versions of the Bible. I understand that it is “Old” English but, to me it’s the version that speaks to my heart...I do not think it is the “ONLY” version we should read and unfortunately I have seen others who fight over versions of the Word of GOD, which I will never understand.
I wanted to read this book because I wanted to learn the history of this version and this is the book to read if you want to also.
I believe that GOD gave William Tyndale the wisdom and understanding to be able to such an important thing.
Could you imagine NOT having a Bible.....I know I take advantage of having several Bibles in several different versions but yet I do not take the time to read them.... For all William Tyndale and all the others went through just to share the most important book to read...I am ashamed of myself.
David Teems must have had some very hard times too, due to the fact that Tyndale was not a very public man....I was impressed by what he does write about this man and those who helped him. Though there are very little records of Tyndale, David shares all the information that is available and I was impressed how much David did share.
It was an okay read, for me the fonts were too small and it is lengthy but, the information in it was worth finding out about... I think it is good for all of us to learn about things in history and how things have come about and at what costs...especially when it is about Yahweh...to me it helps me to be more thankful for the things o do have....most importantly Gods Word.
I lift up David teems to Gods throne of Grace, asking HIM to continue to use him in furthering the Gospel of Christ Jesus and for HIS Glory.
in Jesus’ Matchless name. Amen.
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Review 8 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Everyone Should Read!!

Date:February 5, 2012
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Gently Mad
Location:Longview TX
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Tyndale is broken up into four parts. Teems first expounds on the invaluable contribution Tyndale made to the English language- so much so that many historians and linguists have asserted that without Tyndale there would have been no Shakespeare. Teems lists several examples of famous quotes from the Bard which are in themselves quotes or at least words borrowed from Tyndale’s translation of the New Testament.
I must confess that I never thought about how powerful an impact it must have been to hear the Word- which a medieval person was to live their entire life around- in their own heart language. For the first time in a thousand years people were reading and hearing God speak to them in their native tongue. The experience must have torn the veil from their Savior’s face. Finally the Gospel was accessible to all and people no longer depended on The Roman Catholic church to tell them what God said.
As Luther did in Germany just a few years earlier, Tyndale revealed to the general populace that scripture made no mention of penance, purgatory, or works-based salvation. The response of the Catholic Church was predictable.
The second part of the book describes Tyndale’s years of hiding on the European continent to escape heresy charges and execution in England at the hands of the Bishops and especially of Thomas More who made it his personal obsession to bring Tyndale to the stake. Teems includes many excerpts from letters and expositions that both More and Tyndale wrote debating each other’s position. Ironically, More and Tyndale died within a year of each other both at the hands of the deranged Henry VIII.
In the conclusion, Tyndale’s betrayal and execution are described as well as his year long trial where Catholic leaders debated Tyndale as he languished in his cold, damp cell. For months they tried to bring him to see the sinfulness of his doctrines: his belief that the Bible should be in lay language for everyone to read and not only in Latin, in the hands exclusively of church leaders.
One thing I found eye-opening was the doctrine that the Catholic Church and the authority of the Pope came before Scripture. Therefore, Scripture could only be interpreted according what the Church leaders said it meant. I don’t know if the contemporary Catholic church maintains this stance or not.
The last part of the book contains a time line of Tyndale’s life and work and a glossary of words that Tyndale contributed to the English language.
I thoroughly enjoyed this book for the information it provided and the writing style in which it was written. It is comparable to reading a novel along the lines of something written by Hugo or Tolstoy. Teems inclusion of several quotes from famous authors indicate his own influence as a writer.
In conclusion, this book is important for the insight it provides on a little-known but important contributor to the most important Book in the world and I highly recommend it.
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Review 9 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

How We Got the English Bible

Date:January 30, 2012
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RollTideGirl
Location:Alabama
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4 out of 5
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In Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice, David Teems take us through a period in history when translating the Bible into the English language was considered a criminal act. He follows the life of William Tyndale who put together the first English Bible translated from the original Greek and Hebrew texts.
Not much is known about Tyndale on a personal level but there is lots of speculation surrounding his personal life. Most of what we know to be factual is based upon his work with the translation of the Bible. While the book is not written in a chronological timeline like you would expect with most biographies, this book skips around a lot in the storyline. In the back of the book, there is a chronological timeline if you want to visually piece together the different chapters and how they actually played out in the life of Tyndale.
Tyndale grew up in a normal childhood setting and later attended college. In 1515, he was ordained a priest (not uncommon for graduates of Oxford/Cambridge). He returned to his native land of Glouchestshire and became a tutor to a wealthy landowner's children. He preached and studied deeply and was burdened that the scriptures must be translated into an English text. To escape being a heretic, he went into exile on the Continent and never saw England again. Over the next 10 years, he studied Hebrew and began translating the New Testament. What happened during this time and in the years to come after??? Well, you'll have to read the book to find out......
This book also does an amazing job of connecting you with people within the same time period of Tyndale such as Ann Boleyn, a crazy English king, Lord Chancellor, etc. Throughout the book, you can clearly see what an enormous amount of respect Teems has for Tyndale and it is evident through his writing. This book is packed full of historical content, time lines and really makes you appreciate Tyndale's dedication and sacrifice to bringing us the English Bible.
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Review 10 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Exceeded Expectations

Date:January 30, 2012
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Willtellall
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Though well researched, the book is never academically dry. It often reads like a novel, with surprising turns of insight, bringing Tyndale and his times to life in entertaining and eventful ways.
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Review 11 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A Superior Biography

Date:January 16, 2012
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Elaine Campbell
Location:Rancho Mirage, CA
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We are lucky to have this biography of William Tyndale because of the natural melding of the author's poetic prose skills with the subject's poetic and natural ear. Therefore, author and subject complement each other. This is no dry history here; every page is palpable and energetically charged. It is an extraordinary story about an extraordinary man and his genius talent; and at the book's conclusion one has a feeling, not of letdown (though it certainly has the most unhappy of endings), but of a complacent sense of peace. And that is because the reader intuitively knows that Tyndale was never defeated, never ungraced, never dishonored and truly went to his demise loving his enemies (not pretending to love them, but really doing so), understanding that their betrayal and persecution of him gave him the opportunity to follow the Lord's exhortation.
After what seems to have been a normal childhood, and a true to form university life (at Oxford; whether he also attended Cambridge, a newer and less traditional university, is debatable), he was ordained as a priest around 1515, not uncommon for an Oxford or Cambridge graduate. He then returned to his native Gloucestershire and became a tutor of the children of a wealthy landowner. He preached at nearby villages, studied and became convinced that Scripture, theretofore never translated into English from the Greek, must needs be accessible to the common man. The Roman Catholic Church exhibited many corrupt practices (they even seem absurd to us today), such as the buying one's way out of purgatory through payment to the Church. Priests had concubines and became exceedingly wealthy. The word of the papacy superseded the word of Scripture in the eyes of the Roman Catholic Church. And those eyes were everywhere; as was their concomitant power.
To escape from being burned as a heretic, as so many were, Tyndale early went into exile on the Continent and never saw England again. During the next ten years, while living as a fugitive, he also learned Hebrew and translated the New Testament, many books of the Old Testament and wrote introductions and essays. Copies of these works were smuggled into England and the hunt and the will was on to silence him. In the end he was betrayed by a young Englishman he admired and trusted, even though others around him were uneasy about the sincerity of the younger's friendship. There is much to ponder about Tyndale's utter misjudgment of this man, why his instinctive and intuitive faculties failed him about such a crucial matter—that of his own life. Did he not listen to his inner voice, or did he simply dismiss it as a misleading trifle?
He had the ear of a poet, a genius for finding the right word for the exact meaning, and extended the English vocabulary by numerous first usages of words. Even more (and this is what really invokes a sense of awe in the reader) was, as he was so steeped in his life's commitment to his task at no matter what the cost, he penetrated the deepest meanings of Scripture, understood and lived them.
The writing is done in a relaxed tone, almost as musical as Tyndale's own (as I said, they are a good match) and the only question open in my mind is whether David Teems over-idolizes Tyndale. As the great psychiatrist Carl Jung pointed out, every man has a shadow. Tyndale must have had one too, as great as he was. The book does not address the inferior side of his nature, no matter how small it might have been.
So this is a fascinating journey through a rough, difficult period with a crazy English king (at least in his later years) and plucky Ann Boleyn, sadistic Lord Chancellor and Bishop of London, and shocking methods of torture and execution for even more shocking and unjust reasons. The whole panoply of the panorama of the time is adeptly verbally painted with Tyndale, in a foreign country, with little funds, at work in his tiny room with his books, his writings and his life's meaning and mission close at hand.
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Review 12 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

An important lesson in Christian History

Date:January 14, 2012
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Jessica
Age:25-34
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Where would we be without the English Bible? How many people would never have read the Word of God for themselves? In “Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice” David Teems takes us through a time in history when translating the Bible into English was considered heretical and criminal. He follows the path of William Tyndale’s life as Tyndale put together the first English Bible translated from the original Greek and Hebrew languages.
The title of the book is a bit misleading. This isn’t really a biography like we’re used to. Not much is known about Tyndale outside of his written work. What is known about him personally has a lot of speculation around it. The subtitle captures the idea of the book more closely. There is a lot of information surrounding Tyndale’s English Bible. We get to see how Tyndale chose the best fitting words for the translation, the drama of the times, Tyndale’s exile and arrest, and how Tyndale has effected both literature (including Shakespeare) with his style and our modern English with words he introduced for the first time. However, Teems doesn’t just focus on Tyndale. We also learn a good bit about Thomas More, Tyndale’s biggest adversary (and the author of the famous “Utopia”) as well as other key people involved in the translation, both for and against Tyndale.
I had two problems with the book. The first is really a minor issue of just a little annoyance and I guess sort of a pet peeve for me: Teems often changes how he refers to King Henry VIII. Changing from Henry VIII, to H8, to Harry. If I remember correctly, the very first reference to the King is H8. At that point I had only assumed Teems was referring to Henry VIII, but as the book went on I saw that he used the Henry VIII and H8 interchangeably. Then I see “Harry” thrown in there and that kind of threw me. It’s not until a couple of “Harry” references later, in the last chapter or so, that we are told Henry VIII preferred to be called “Harry.” The second issue is a bit more serious in the way the book is organized. It doesn’t really follow a straight timeline. The chapters are somewhat theme-based and so it tends to jump around in time a bit, which left me feeling a bit disconnected at times.
What I loved about this book is the obvious respect, and I might even say affection, that Teems has for Tyndale. He talks about Tyndale as if he’d known the man for years. When the author cares that much, it’s hard not to feel drawn in by it.
I received a complimentary copy of this book for review purposes from BookSneeze.
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Review 13 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Excellent and informative read

Date:January 9, 2012
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Cowperthwaitefamily
Location:Thomaston, Maine
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4 out of 5
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"Tyndale: The man who gave God an English voice" is a book that gives great historical and biographical insight into the world of Christians during the 16th century in England, weaving facts and quotes into a well crafted tale to bring vibrancy to a life that ended nearly five centuries ago. Well known for his intellect and integrity before God, William Tyndale surely is a great subject for such an in depth book as this is. From the major players to those behind the scenes, each character is developed with great depth and gives more than a sense of knowledge, but adds in the senses of sight, taste, and touch to such characters as Anne Boleyn, King Henry VIII, and even the dark strength of Thomas More. Heroes and villains come to life in the pages of David Teems writing.
The author draws you to more than knowledge of the character and life of Tyndale, but makes you feel some of what he must have felt living a life of exile for his beliefs and obedience to God. Abounding with quotes from other works of the period, one could easily become fully immersed in such a tale, even enough to truly feel the fear and trepidation that were the hallmark of William Tyndale's life.
Though other books have drawn me to feel compassion for the characters and to know more of history, this book digs into the depths of the human soul, to challenge one's perception of long held beliefs that may indeed be more part of church history than the plan God designed the church to be. Taking on issues of power and trust within religious circles, this book is sure to raise a few eyebrows in disgust, and yet the story is evidence that sometimes one must break the mold of what we think we know to find what is truly God's design. A work of art that does true justice to the language of literature lovers, David Teems has left a great impression on this readers to be sure.
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Review 14 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Beautifully written, amazingly informative.

Date:January 9, 2012
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MaryRuth
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Growing up in a Christian home, I've heard about William Tyndale all my life, about how he translated the Bible into English even though it was against the law and how eventually he was burned at the stake for it. But I'd never done any in-depth study on his life or work until I read this book.
In Tyndale, David Teems has done a beautifully artistic job of not only recounting the events of William Tyndale's life and work as a translator, but also of bringing to light the impact Tyndale had on the English language itself.
This book is not written in the typical 'date-event, date-event' format of most biographies. Instead, he focuses more on one particular idea or aspect or implication of Tyndale's work or mindset at a time. As a result I occasionally found myself getting confused about what was happening when, where, and to whom, but the handy time line in the back of the book made it easy to clear up my confusion. Over all, I found the format of the book refreshing and engaging.
In addition to the time line, the book has several other appendices containing bibliographies, words and phrases that Tyndale contributed to English, and more. The appendices are well worth reading for extra information and insight.
My favorite part of this book was the way in which it didn't just focus solely on William Tyndale and what he was doing when; it did a beautiful job making the connections between people and events all over Europe during the Reformation. Even if something didn't necessarily apply directly to William Tyndale, if it applied to the Reformation Tyndale was a part of, or contributed to events that pertained to him, the author explained it and went into detail regarding its impact and effect. After reading this book I feel like I have ten times the understanding of the Reformation as I did before.
I had to take this book slowly (it took me several days to get through it) simply because of the enormous amounts of information presented and the time it took to process all of the historical connections and applications the author delivered. But it was absolutely worth the effort. Tyndale is a book that will be staying in my collection for a long, long time.
I received this book free of charge from the publisher in exchange for my review. I was not required to write a favorable review, however. My opinions are entirely my own.
+2points
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Review 15 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

An excellent work. Well worth the read.

Date:January 8, 2012
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Jason Harris
Location:Cairns, Australia.
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A renowned critic suggested that only Shakespeare’s prose “is capable of surviving comparison with Tyndale’s.” Yet Tyndale lived his life—and performed his art—in exile.
This is no mere biography. It is, rather, a scholarly exposition, an historical work. Drawing on the writings of Tyndale and those around him, Teems presents Tyndale in a way that leaves you less confident of the things you thought you knew about him, but more familiar with the substance of William Tyndale as a person.
Chapters are devoted to the various stages of Tyndale’s life as well as to his translation work and his other writings. Significant space is given to providing the historical context of Tyndale’s work and to introducing the men—both friend and foe—who impacted Tyndale most.
THE UPS
First, this book is a rich source of historical information on the Reformation era. Significant portions are devoted to men such as Martin Luther, Sir Thomas More, Oliver Cromwell, Anne Boleyn, Desiderius Erasmus, Henry VIII, Thomas Wolsey, and many other figures whose lives intersected with the translator’s. The reader will gain rich insights from these encounters.
Second, the reader will come away from this book having read first hand excerpts from many of the letters and documents that shaped the world in which we live.
Third, Teems devotes much space to Tyndale’s translation of the New Testament and the impact it had. There is a helpful discussion on Tyndale’s philosophy of translation and a wealth of information about the history of our English Bible stemming from Wycliffe’s work and progressing through Tyndale’s work to that of his companion, Myles Coverdale, and others.
Fourth, Teems digs into Tyndale’s writings to catch a glimpse of Tyndale that is deeper than the normal focus on his translation work. He seeks to understand his thinking, his philosophy, his theology, and his passion. One highlight for me was learning that even though Tyndale’s translation was considered no little crime, it was for his crime of defending the “heresy” of sola fide (justification by faith alone) that he was condemned to die.
THE DOWNS
First, though Teems’ subtle humour provided me with many a good chuckle, his thoroughness borders at times on tedium. Still, it is some of the more pleasurable tedium you’re likely to encounter.
Second, this work is more academic than devotional. At times it is obtuse.
Third, The relationship between the author as a Christian and the author as a scholar is awkward at times. The author is ambiguous about where he stands regarding the Roman Catholic Church and the Reformers. On a few occasions, theologically liberal views are hinted at such as denial of the supernatural.
Fourth, though there are some helpful appendices, there is no subject index. This is disappointingly inconvenient for a work of this nature.
CONCLUSION
An excellent work. Well worth the read. Enjoyable. Enriching. Edifying.
+3points
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Review 16 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Tyndale gives the plowman the Word of God

Date:January 7, 2012
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Vera
Location:North Carolina
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5 out of 5
Meet William Tyndale, a contemporary of Martin Luther, and Thomas Moore. David Teems presents a thorough history of the life and work of William Tyndale and how he was persecuted because he wished to create a Bible in the language of the people of his time and place - the English. Previous to this time (by two centuries) Wycliff, translated the Bible into English. Wycliff's English Bible did, indeed, impact the translation work done by Tyndale. Tyndale's work was, however, translated from the original Greek language. The author of this biography of Tyndale, David Teems references only slightly Wycliff's translation in this book.
The Catholic Church did not allow translations they did not endorse or create and persecuted anyone involved in such activity. They certainly did not want the Bible placed in the hands of people other than clergy. If you are at all familiar with the period of history dealing with the Reformation, the Renaissance, and the controlling power that the Catholic Church held over all social levels during that period, you already have a grasp of the difficulties facing Tyndale. However, Tyndale desired to see the Scriptures in his own language for his own people. Therefore, he endured hardship, banishment, peril, and censorship all causing him to move from his homeland. Eventually his choice to bring God's Word to the English in their own language cost him his life.
"Lord! Open the King of England's eyes"
were his last spoken words.
So you ask, just what is Tyndale's legacy? We don't hear a lot about the Tyndale translation. It gets about as much mention historically as Wycliff's and other Biblical translation works. However, the beautiful language in the Bible - the King James Bible - has it's "first appearance, or first mention" in the Tyndale Bible. These include the beautifully phrased wording given to us by the workmanship and pen of William Tyndale.
I found David Teem's biography of Tyndale interesting yet difficult to read. It is not a casual read. Teems examines Tyndale's work paralleling it with works of more modern writers such as Thomas Wolfe. I find this inappropriate because we are dealing with vastly differing types of writing and periods in which these literary giants wrote. Tyndale's "style" and literary genius of expression are or should be directly attributable to the work that he was accomplishing because he was translating directly from the original languages into his own and his work was of a "holy" nature and not that of the secular world.
We in Christendom have much for which to be grateful because of the writings of William Tyndale as well as his beautiful translation of Scripture - Old and New Testaments.
Behold the lamb of God
I am the way, the truth, and the life
In my father's house are many mansions
For thine is the kingdom and the power and the glory
Seek, and ye shall find
With God all things are possible
In him we live, move, and have our being
Be not weary in well doing
Looking unto Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith
Behold, I stand at the door and knock
Let not your hearts be troubled
The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak
For my yoke is easy and my burden is light
Fight the good fight
(These phrases made their first appearance in translations
of the Scriptures by Tyndale. pg. xx Prologue, Tyndale)
I received a complimentary copy of this book from Thomas Nelson Publishers in exchange for a review. I was not required to render a positive review. Opinions expressed are my own.
NOTE: There are short bio-histories of William Tyndale online. The following link substantiates David Teem's disclosure and collaboration that William Tyndale's New Testament was translated from the original Greek and not from the works of Wycliffe and Luther. http://www.greatsite.com/timeline-english-bible-history/william-tyndale.htmlEnglish Bible History-William Tyndale
This review is on my blog: http://ChatWithVera.blogspot.com
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Review 17 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

a valuable historical account

Date:January 2, 2012
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Linda
Age:45-54
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Tyndale – David Teems
‘Tyndale’ is a comprehensive volume of what William Tyndale had to endure to translate the New Testament and parts of the Old from Greek into English. A master of eight languages this man of God was determined to not let anything and anyone stand in the way of his life’s work of ‘bringing God to the plow boy’. Most of his translation work was done while exiled - ‘a stranger in a strange land’, poor, lonely and on the run to escape imprisonment. Still, he never lost focus and was very conscientious about his monumental task: “…I never altered one syllable of God’s word against my conscience, nor would do this day, if all that is in the earth, whether it be honour, pleasure, or riches might be given me.”
Because this is written in textbook fashion – fine print, long paragraphs with little to no dialogue, this book is not an easy read and therefore takes a while to get into it. However, once I was at the point where the author studies the dynamic literary debates between Tyndale and Thomas More, a staunch Catholic who loathed ‘the Captain of Englyshe heretikes’, I was totally absorbed. Teems did an admirable job of comparing and contrasting Tyndale and More – ‘two men, two visions of life, two faiths’ and ironically enough both were executed.
I was surprised how much Tyndale has contributed the English language. Besides lyrical phrases like ‘blessed are the peacekeepers’, William Tyndale is also credited with adding words like Godly, sanctified, chastening, zealous to the English dictionary, to name but a few.
In exchange for and honest review, I received a complimentary copy of this book from Book Sneeze. My views are my own.
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Review 18 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Tyndale - The Man Who Gave God an English Voice

Date:January 2, 2012
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StevenCYC
Location:Toronto, ON
Age:18-24
Gender:male
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5 out of 5
Growing up with stories of Christian heroes was exhilarating, the likes of Martin Luther, Joan of Arc, William Wilberforce, and other notable and historic Christian leaders left a desire to pursue a life of daunting faith like they once did. David Teems, author of Tyndale – The Man Who Gave God An English Voice, did an excellent job in bringing to life another hero of the faith. This book is a biography of a man who translated the first English Bible; he was always on the run hiding from public prosecution, escaping the dangers of the Catholic Church, and despite feeling homesick found an enriched comfort in the living Word of God.
I fell in love with this book the moment I started reading the Introduction, it’s written in a very eloquent perspective, incorporating a lot of history of not only Tyndale but of others around him as well. It must however be understood that not many sources survive in order to retell the story of Tyndale’s life, most historic documentations were either never recorded to begin-with or were utterly destroyed, but one thing was for certain that although his own name may have been denied or forgotten, his work lives on as we carry our own English Bibles in our journey of faith.
Despite the book having many positives in content and richness of historicity, it does have a down-side. It’s not an easy to read book; it can be rather dull and unappealing for those not so interested in history, and the vocabulary is on a much higher level than your average English conversation. Yet nonetheless, the book is spectacular, provides historical insight, and recognizes the life of a man who gave up everything so that mankind can come to know God through his Sovereign Word. It’s definitely a book on my recommendation list, and although not for easy-readers, its undoubtedly a must-read for dedicated students who have a heart for the unforgettable work of William Tyndale, a hero and martyr.
I’ve received this complimentary yet-to-be-released book from the Thomas Nelson Publishing House through the Book Sneeze program in exchange for a review. A positive review was not required and the views expressed in my review are strictly my own.
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Review 19 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Tyndale: A Review of David Teems’ Book

Date:December 30, 2011
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4himCAMPer
Location:Ramsey, MN
Age:25-34
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David Teems writes a thorough as possible biography of William Tyndale. What is known of Tyndale falls into three categories: documented truth, possible truth, and legend/folklore. David gives a brief overview of Tyndale’s life through his initial days as a student at Oxford. He then focuses on Tyndale’s life from his time at Oxford until he is martyred 6 October 1536. During this period is when we run into most of Tyndale’s legend.
I received the book in time for Christmas Eve and started reading it before company arrived. It then took me three days before I could read it again since it had been left at my parents’ place twice. Once I got the book back in hand, I started reading it every chance I had. I found it fascinating reading how we got the first English Bible based off the original languages of Hebrew and Greek not just the Latin Vulgate as Wycliffe translation was based. With Tyndale we saw a man that had determination and a love for God that ran deep. Seeing what he went through to get the New Testament translated as well as portions of the Old Testament kept me captivated. Also reading some of the potential though likely untrue conversations that happened as a process of trying to end Tyndale’s translation and publishing added a light side to a book that has several dark moments such as Tyndale going into exile and the fact that the catholic church was willing to dispose of anyone who did not blindly follow the teachings of the church and the pope no matter how much error there was in theology. Anyone who likes biographies, Bible history, or church history will find this book interesting. This is also good for someone who likes intrigue in the books they read.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 FCR, Part 255.
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Review 20 for Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Outstanding Biography

Date:December 24, 2011
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Jimmy Reagan
Location:West Union, OH
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You always assumed, I’m sure, that William Tyndale was an important man in Christian history. This book shows just how amazingly important he was. You knew about his first English translation of the New Testament, perhaps you even knew he died as a martyr. Did you know, though, that he had a great effect on our English language? He is credited with many words in our language coming from his pen. If you are a lover of the KJV as I am, you will be shocked as I was to learn that many of the most memorable lines of the KJV came over unchanged from Tyndale. Consider:
Let not your hearts be troubled
The Lord bless thee and keep thee. The Lord make his face to shine upon thee and be merciful unto thee.
…for whither thou goest, I will go, and where thou dwellest, there I will dwell.
There are many others that Mr. Teems shares with us. You leave this book convinced that Tyndale has had the greatest influence of all on the Word of God in English. There really is no close second.
You are impressed too as you read of Tyndale’s simple faith and dogged determination to translate the Bible into English. It was his driving passion from which he never wavered. Mr. Teems quotes Tyndale in regards to his translation work:
"…that I never altered one syllable of God’s word against my conscience, nor would do this day, if all that is in the earth, whether it be honour, pleasure, or riches, might be given me."
Though Mr. Teems didn’t exactly word it this way, it is obvious that Tyndale was especially gifted by God for his great work. It was his life’s work, one that cost him greatly, living and running as a fugitive with loneliness and danger always staring him in the face.
Mr. Teems has done us great service in this volume. He is handy with a pen. His own literary skill makes him able to demonstrate how deep Tyndale’s talents really go. He holds Tyndale up beside the great literary figures and even mentions where Shakespeare used Tyndale. I finished this book thinking that more than a heroic man, Tyndale was one of the really great ones. Perhaps he hasn’t had his due, but Mr. Teems while fairly showing his faults, accurately presents us with “Tyndale: The Man Who Gave God an English Voice.”
I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255
+2points
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