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Customer Reviews for Thomas Nelson Sabbath: The Ancient Practices - eBook

Thomas Nelson Sabbath: The Ancient Practices - eBook

Does resting on the Sabbath mean to cease all activity? In his new book Dan Allender presents an insightful and fascinating look at the origins and purpose of the Sabbath day. Serving as volume three in The Ancient Practices Series, Sabbath examines the key issues of this oft-misunderstood day of the week.

This "day of delight," as instituted by God, has become a dirge for millions of believers. For many, it is simply a break from the busyness of the work week. So, what keeps us from properly understanding, sanctifying and celebrating this important day? Allender looks at not only the history of this discipline, going all the way back to ancient Israel, but also at the modern manifestations and misunderstandings of its practice. Drawing upon the Hebrew word Menuha, Allender bases his premise upon the forgotten definition for this word (best translated as joyous repose, tranquility, or delight) and what it truly means to rest.
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Customer Reviews for Sabbath: The Ancient Practices - eBook
Review 1 for Sabbath: The Ancient Practices - eBook
This review is fromSabbath: The Ancient Practices.
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Sabbath by Dan Allender

Date:July 20, 2011
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sberbec
Location:Seattle, WA
Age:18-24
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
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4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
If we’re to be honest, most of us give little, if any, regard to the fourth commandment: Sabbath. Our assumption is that it’s an easily fulfilled commandment that can be crossed off the list, weekly. Namely, Sabbath has become associated with church on Sunday and/or having the day off. According to Allender, this is not a Sabbath. Rather, Allender presents an alternative perspective challenging the so-called norms of what it means to really Sabbath without all the legalistic connotations typically associated with the term.
A day of Sabbath is a day of delight. In order to participate in a day of Sabbath, one must ask what it is that brings them most delight. The Sabbath is sensual. Delight is experienced with the senses in what we see, hear, taste, smell, and touch. Sabbath activities include, but are not limited to: enjoying savory food, drinking expensive wine, listening to good music, worship, sex, reading, conversations, going for a walk, being quiet, etc., while experiencing holiness and God’s presence in each. Sabbath does not involve a particular day (i.e., Sunday). Nor does it necessarily involve going to church, taking an afternoon nap and preparing for the week to come.
It is worth noting that Allender presents this material from first hand experience. Not only does he teach Sabbath classes at The Seattle School of Theology and Psychology (formerly known as Mars Hill Graduate School), but he and his wife routinely practice the Sabbath together, making his writings credible. That is, Sabbath as taught by Allender can really be experienced and many of such personal experiences are shared within this book. That being said, I highly recommend reading Sabbath by Dan Allender. It is an easy read and leaves the reader craving an experience with God in a day of Sabbath.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Review 2 for Sabbath: The Ancient Practices - eBook
This review is fromSabbath: The Ancient Practices.
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

Was not what I anticipated.

Date:March 9, 2011
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Felicia
Location:Whittier
Age:55-65
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Quality: 
1 out of 5
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1 out of 5
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1 out of 5
1 out of 5
This was too much of the author's personal experiences.
I was expecting a book that really talked about Biblical events, so I could have greater understanding of Bible time customs etc. The book did not do that.
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Review 3 for Sabbath: The Ancient Practices - eBook
This review is fromSabbath: The Ancient Practices.
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

New perspectives but forgets old

Date:March 7, 2011
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Theorybell
Location:WI
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
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4 out of 5
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3 out of 5
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Sabbath by Dan B. Allender—a book review
The fourth commandment, found in Exodus 20, is “Remember the Sabbath day by keeping it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is a sabbath to the LORD your God. On it you shall not do any work, neither you, nor your son or daughter, nor your male or female servant, nor your animals, nor any foreigner residing in your towns. For in six days the LORD made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, but he rested on the seventh day. Therefore the LORD blessed the Sabbath day and made it holy.” Because this is one of the Ten Commandments, Allender writes this book about the importance of observing this day of the week. Delighting in this day is a prevalent theme throughout the book. “The Sabbath is an invitation to enter delight. The Sabbath, when experienced as God intended, is the best day of our lives” (p. 4). Allender gives personal examples and suggestions of how to delight in this day, especially through enjoying God's creation. He recognizes the fact that most Christians do not observe this day or even think twice about it.
This book, overall, has some interesting points to ponder regarding how to observe the Sabbath, points that I have never given much thought to before. For example, delighting in the day, rather than just resting and not working, is a new thought to me. I have tended to be somewhat legalistic on how to approach the Sabbath, so this book was refreshing in that regard. Experiencing new parts of God's amazing creation brings us into closer relationship with Him and is something we can truly delight in. It gave me a new perspective.
On the other hand, Allender did not address the issue of rest, other than saying there is more to the Sabbath than that, or that one doesn't necessarily even have to rest at all. In the passage in Exodus above, God commands His creation to rest and make it holy. Other passages throughout the Bible indicate this concept as well, such as when Moses was leading the Israelites in the wilderness and they were to collect manna for the day before the Sabbath as well as the Sabbath. While I understand the need to make it holy in ways other than rest, not working, and not being caught up in legalism, I thought leaving this important piece out of the equation did not do justice to these Sabbath verses.
I would recommend this book to someone looking for new ways to approach the Sabbath. Otherwise, I was somewhat disappointed. I was hoping for a book encompassing the whole of the Sabbath, to challenge me. I have read books by Allender before and have appreciated his writing, but in my opinion, this is not one of his best books.
I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program.
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Review 4 for Sabbath: The Ancient Practices - eBook
This review is fromSabbath: The Ancient Practices.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:January 29, 2011
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berf
Location:Seattle, Wa.
Age:Over 65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
A book of celebration. Yeah! A book of do's instead of don'ts. I bought six copies so I have some to give to my friends. When I run out, I'm ordering more.
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Review 5 for Sabbath: The Ancient Practices - eBook
This review is fromSabbath: The Ancient Practices.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Poetic and Straightforward

Date:January 20, 2011
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kitkatm
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
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5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Very point blank, Dan Allendar writes from the viewpoint that the Sabbath is not just merely a day to go to church with like-minded people, but a day to revel in God's splendor. His allegorical style of writing can seem a bit choppy at times but he gets the point across. Slowly, we are guided as to how we can change our prosaic lifestyles.
A study guide is provided in the back so one can pause and reflect upon the words expressed within the book. The ideas are so different and non-conforming as to what most churched people are used to hearing that time for reflection is needed and encouraged.
Written Biblically, this book is given 5 stars.
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Review 6 for Sabbath: The Ancient Practices - eBook
This review is fromSabbath: The Ancient Practices.
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

sabbath rest

Date:January 17, 2011
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mojo
Location:San Dimas, CA
Age:35-44
Gender:male
Dan is president and professor of counseling at Mars Hill Graduate School near Seattle, Washington. He is a therapist in private practice, and a frequent speaker and seminar leader.
Keeping the Sabbath is one of the hardest of the 10 Commandments to truly keep. Seems weird that modern-day Christians can’t observe a day off, but it seems to be true. Sure, we take the time to go to church for an hour, and maybe meet up with some friends at a diner for lunch, but is that what God had in mind?
Scripture says that we are to observe a day of rest and keep it “holy.” Holy would mean “sacred” and “set apart” from other days, but how “different” is Sunday from the other days for most of us? Author Dan Allender proposes that we as followers of God are to not just observe a “set apart day” but to also “rest” by observing God’s blessing that day. The Sabbath is a day to delight in the Lord. On the Sabbath we should distance ourselves from the “daily” of our lives and find the joy of God. Allender makes an argument for how he sees “rest” on the Sabbath by defining four Sabbath pillars: sensual glory, holy time, communal feast, and play.
“Time, food, conversation, sorrow, hope and companionship take on a rare, sweet, and compelling cast when one discovers holy time. ‘The Earth is the Lord’s’ (Ps 24:1), and all space is holy; yet not all space has been sanctified. But time – a single day, the Sabbath – is to be sanctified as Holy.”
Together these pillars make up an attitude of “joy” and further defines how he sees rest.
Like the previous Ancient Practice books I have read, I noticed the same complaints from reviewers. This book was light on scripture and light on being “like a textbook.” I even read one reviewer who wanted the author to come out and say, “go to church” on the Sabbath. But again, I would stress if that is the kind of book you want to read; those books have been written already. The world is full of books that have been written and rewritten – the world is full of people saying the same things. If you want someone to tell you something that you already know, then you are only reading a book to confirm your faith. I would rather read a book to be challenged or to see a thing from a different angle.
I am sure Allender is not opposed to “going to church” on the Sabbath, but I think he would rather you read his book and then make that connection yourself. Allender uses very vivid and poetic language, he paints a portrait of the Sabbath using phraseology the typical reader might not be used to.
“The Sabbath is my day; it is our day. We are created to create the sensual rhythms and rituals to taste God’s favor. All we must do is to go play in the fields of God and turn our senses to his faithful love. He is ready to play, nourish, and cherish us in a way that is not unlike the other six days, yet is different.”
Again I recommended these books to anyone who is open to a new and different voice; a person who appreciates hearing new words spoken into ancient truths.
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Review 7 for Sabbath: The Ancient Practices - eBook
This review is fromSabbath: The Ancient Practices.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great Book

Date:January 3, 2011
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BeLoveServe
Location:London
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
5 out of 5
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I recently received a book, that is part of the Ancient Practices Series with Thomas Nelson publishing, titled Sabbath. The book is authored by Dan B. Allender. I have a very limited past experience with Dan Allender; however, the little I had read and seen of him, I was often challenged and encouraged. One of my favourite experiences with Mr. Allender was learning from him in the Convergence videos, hosted by Donald Miller (one of my favourite authors). This book has added to my appreciation for the wisdom of Dan Allender. He clearly is a gifted word smith. Often I found myself stopping to pondering a single sentence. The book is filled with depth and meaning. I will share a few of my favourite quotes.
- “Time, food, conversation, sorrow, hope, and companionship take on a rate, sweet, and compelling cast when one discovers holy time. ‘The earth is the LORD’s’ (Ps. 24:1), and all space is holy; yet, not all space has been sanctified. But time – a singe day, the Sabbath – is to be sanctified as holy.”
- “Many who take the Sabbath seriously and intentionally ruin it with legislation and worrisome fences that protect the Sabbath but destroy its delight.”
- “The Sabbath is a day when the kingdom to come has come and is celebrated now rather than anticipated tomorrow.”
- “Beauty is both what we crave and more than we can bear.”
- “what part of creation will you love this sabbath?”
- “Sabbath is not a break from work; it is a redefinition of how we work, why we work, and how we create freedom through our work.”
- “There is meant to be more risk and danger on the sabbath than any other day.”
- “We must be willing to fail at sabbath to learn to play well.”
- “Worry is anti-Sabbath.”
- “Whatever the role God chooses, he enlivens, disturbs, and sets us into motion to engage both his absence and presence.”
- “Praise is meant to be given and received with eyes open, irrespective of the discomfort attending the process.”
- “All human beings are created to enjoy the freedom of the sabbath.”
- “Action is always enough if it is faithful to the call of the moment.”
The book is structured around 3 main parts. The first few chapters discuss sabbath pillars. The author then leads the reader through the purpose of sabbath. Namely, Allender takes the reader through the idea of sabbath play. Encouraging surrender from division, destitution, & despair towards shalom, abundance, & joy. The last part of the book focuses on acting out sabbath. I did not have the pleasure of working through this book with a group, but a very thoughtful study guide is provided with the book. I would assume this book would be a great resource for small groups to study. Personally, I loved the book, and needed to hear its message. The author does a great job of using stories, and personal vulnerability to encourage the reader to experience sabbath. I hope I dont only recommend this book, but live out its teachings.
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Review 8 for Sabbath: The Ancient Practices - eBook
This review is fromSabbath: The Ancient Practices.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:August 22, 2009
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Kim Anderson
Soul-searching, gut-wrenching provocation to reach for God with fresh intensity. Forget all the rules. Forget your obsession with busyness. This is a call to a discipline(!) of delight.
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