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Customer Reviews for Thomas Nelson Something That Lasts: a novel - eBook

Thomas Nelson Something That Lasts: a novel - eBook

Average Customer Rating:
3.667 out of 5
3.7
 out of 
5
(3 Reviews) 3
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Customer Reviews for Something That Lasts: a novel - eBook
Review 1 for Something That Lasts: a novel - eBook
This review is fromSomething That Lasts.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:March 16, 2009
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Donna
I just finished reading this book and absolutely loved it! The author told a wonderful, sometimes heartwrenching story of how one man's wrong choice hurt his family and himself for decades to come. Ultimately, it is a story of the forgiveness and healing that is available to all of us...no matter how terrible the sin.I highly recommend this book; it is a great read!
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Review 2 for Something That Lasts: a novel - eBook
This review is fromSomething That Lasts.
Overall Rating: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5

Date:August 12, 2008
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Vanita
I didn't care for the book, neither did my mom. It is not a book I will reread, in fact I am planning on selling it. Not a keeper for me.
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Review 3 for Something That Lasts: a novel - eBook
This review is fromSomething That Lasts.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:June 22, 2006
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Harriet Klausner
The Post-Dispatch named Reverend David Parst one of the fifty most influential leaders in the St. Louis area. David has a loving wife Sarah and a delightful twelve year old son Jack. His flock at the O'Fallon Bible Church thinks the world of him. He has everything going perfectly.<P>At church on Sunday David asks his congregation whether there is anything anyone had to say; a minor gesture that always resulted in accolades or silence. Not this time. Ted Balik rises and claims that David is having an affair with his wife Erika before walking out of the edifice to shoot himself. David is stunned as his wife demands he leave, his son is devastated, and the congregation fires him. Seeking redemption, David becomes pastor to a small church in Elsa, Texas.<P>A decade later David still needs forgiveness from his family and the Lord, but has no hopes as he keeps track of them albeit from a distance like serendipitously watching Jack play college baseball. Jack has become a corporate lawyer who abuses his wife Katie; she flees with their daughter Lynn to live with Sarah.<P>Though a deep Christian character study that looks closely at the impact of a major sin, the protagonist could have starred any person, regardless of religion, abusing their position of power that includes trust in the individual. Thus James David Jordan makes a strong case that a transgression involving trust can prove to be SOMETHING THAT LASTS for a lifetime (and more) as the sins of the father reappear in the offspring. Repenting and even redemption does not always erase the sin as life is not an etch a sketch; this is superior morality fiction as the key players involved with the scandal seem genuine at the time of the adultery and years later.<P>Harriet Klausner
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