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Customer Reviews for Lion Fiction The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1

Lion Fiction The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1

Conan Doyle is on the run from his own fame. Sherlock Holmes's popularity has taken over his life and he sees only one solution-to kill him off. To do this, Doyle flees to Switzerland, to a picturesque village nestled beneath the imposing Reichenbach Falls. There he hopes to find anonymity, but even in this beautiful rural setting, peace eludes him when he finds himself drawn into the mystery surrounding the death of a fellow tourist.

All too soon, Doyle finds the finger of suspicion is pointing at him as the locals unite against the famous writer, convinced that the murder is Sherlock Holmes's fault. But can the creator of the famous detective actually do the sleuthing himself? And is it possible that the character has influenced him too much? Sherlock Holmes has fascinated readers ever since he first burst into fiction, over one hundred years ago. In this novel, the first in a trilogy, we meet his author and discover the difficult relationship between them.

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3.214 out of 5
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Customer Reviews for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Review 1 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:December 19, 2013
Customer Avatar
debwilson
Age:18-24
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Arthur Conan Doyle is on the run from his own fame. Taking a much-needed holiday, Doyle escapes to a picturesque village in Switzerland nestled beneath the imposing Reichenbach Falls. There he hopes to find anonymity, but even in this beautiful rural setting, peace eludes him when he finds himself immediately recognized and involved in the investigation of a mysterious death of a fellow traveler.
All too soon, Doyle s somewhat unwilling, gentle probing into the case causes the finger of suspicion to turn towards him. But can the creator of the famous detective actually do the sleuthing himself? As Doyle learns more and more about the famous character he penned, he finds he is less like Sherlock and more like his sidekick, Watson. Can the sidekick see enough of the picture to solve the case for once?
Sherlock Holmes has fascinated readers since he first burst into fiction, over one hundred years ago. In this novel, the first in a trilogy, we meet his author and discover the difficult relationship between them.
My Review:
I was actually very surprised by this book, because being distributed as a Christian novel, it was just a classic Sherlock Holmes mystery. The premise was intriguing, and it was somewhat of a slow start. Some of the elements of this book certainly didn't point to Doyle's supposed devotion and love for his wife. Doyle's character was looking for answers in the same manner that was common at the time, (nope, not telling you what - I don't do spoilers!) But what I was really disappointed that what should have been a good opportunity to create some tension/resolution in the area of faith, was simply played off as a "falling away." Aside from this information, we are not given any real indication that this book should be marketed as Christian Fiction. It was a great premise, great writing, but it is not what is should have been. That being said, this is a great novel for Sherlock Holmes fans, and I enjoyed it from that perspective.
This book was provided by the publisher for free in exchange for an honest review.
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Review 2 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Date:October 18, 2013
Customer Avatar
debwilson
Age:18-24
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Arthur Conan Doyle is on the run from his own fame. Taking a much-needed holiday, Doyle escapes to a picturesque village in Switzerland nestled beneath the imposing Reichenbach Falls. There he hopes to find anonymity, but even in this beautiful rural setting, peace eludes him when he finds himself immediately recognized and involved in the investigation of a mysterious death of a fellow traveler.
All too soon, Doyle s somewhat unwilling, gentle probing into the case causes the finger of suspicion to turn towards him. But can the creator of the famous detective actually do the sleuthing himself? As Doyle learns more and more about the famous character he penned, he finds he is less like Sherlock and more like his sidekick, Watson. Can the sidekick see enough of the picture to solve the case for once?
Sherlock Holmes has fascinated readers since he first burst into fiction, over one hundred years ago. In this novel, the first in a trilogy, we meet his author and discover the difficult relationship between them.
My Review:
I was actually very surprised by this book, because being distributed as a Christian novel, it was just a classic Sherlock Holmes mystery. The premise was intriguing, and it was somewhat of a slow start. Some of the elements of this book certainly didn't point to Doyle's supposed devotion and love for his wife. Doyle's character was looking for answers in the same manner that was common at the time, (nope, not telling you what - I don't do spoilers!) But what I was really disappointed that what should have been a good opportunity to create some tension/resolution in the area of faith, was simply played off as a "falling away." Aside from this information, we are not given any real indication that this book should be marketed as Christian Fiction. It was a great premise, great writing, but it is not what is should have been. That being said, this is a great novel for Sherlock Holmes fans, and I enjoyed it from that perspective.
This book was provided by the publisher for free in exchange for an honest review.
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Review 3 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Good Story

Date:October 18, 2013
Customer Avatar
deanna13
Location:Jonesboro, LA
Age:Over 65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
The Reichenbach Problem by Martin Allison Booth was a good read but not quite a five star book. Conan Doyle is taking a two week vacation in a small, peaceful town in Switzerland where the Reichenbach Falls are located. Doyle hopes to come to terms with his fame and the impact that fame has on his life as the author of the Sherlock Holmes books. He has more or less come to greatly dislike Holmes and is thinking of writing one more book to kill off the detective. In Zurich, a fellow passenger by the name of Holloway strikes up a conversation with Doyle and from that time on seems to dog every step that Doyle takes. Shortly after the men arrive at their destination, a fellow tourist turns up dead at the Falls and Holloway insists that he and Doyle must investigate and solve the murder or prove that it was an accident and not murder. Doyle’s hope for peace and quiet are completely destroyed when he is accused of being the murderer. To make matters even worse, Holloway believes that the spirit of Sherlock Holmes is now living in him.
For the first two hundred pages of the book I had trouble making myself continue to read. In my opinion there was just too much dialogue and not enough action. In addition, the author’s use of words such as escritoire for a desk was rather distracting for me. When I finally reached page two hundred and one, the story began to get very interesting and I sat up until the wee hours of the morning to finish. If the first two hundred pages had been reduced to about one hundred and added to the last one hundred, then it could have been a five star book. One thing in the book that really bothered me was that Doyle would go off on a two week vacation and leave his young child and pregnant wife at home alone. And Doyle’s reaction to two of the women in the story was upsetting since he kept saying that he deeply loved his wife. All through the story I kept wondering why the local police did not investigate the death of the tourist. My favorite character in the story was Father Vernon for he seemed to be the only character who was what he said he was, and I certainly agreed with his opinion on the séance. I do not want to appear completely negative about the book for it was well written with no grammatical errors which detract from a story, at least in my opinion. Booth appears to be very knowledgeable about Conan Doyle and it would be nice to know which scenes he fictionalized. I thoroughly enjoyed all the mystery in the book and the author skillfully brought all the subplots together at the end of the book. Near the end of the book, Doyle said of himself, “I was disgusted with myself; with my prejudices, my presumptions, my insensitivity, my cruelty and my weakness.” The author did a very good job in making me as the reader feel that same way about Doyle. But at least by the end of the story he seemed to have changed for the better.
I would recommend this book to anyone who likes to read mystery books written by British authors.
Kregel Publications provided me with a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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Review 4 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

GOOD MYSTERY READ!

Date:October 18, 2013
Customer Avatar
Moonpie
Location:PRYOR
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
As a fan of Sherlock Holmes books, I must applaud Mr. Booth on his amazing ability to capture the personality and writing style of the real Arthur Conan Doyle. I felt like I WAS reading Sherlock Holmes.
Fame has proven more than Arthur Conan Doyle can handle so he decides to take a vacation in hopes of finding his family a new home where his celebrity status will not be under such scrutiny. He heads to Switzerland to the peaceful little town of Reichenbach Falls. His grand expectations of an escape into anonymity and peace are shattered when Richard Holloway must share his railroad car and recognizes him. Doyle is annoyed yet polite to his unwanted guest assuming that upon arrival they will go their separate ways. Once the train arrives, Holloway attaches himself to the leery author and even declares them friends to everyone.
Not long after his arrival a man is found dead and it is unknown if he is fell or pushed off a precipice. Pushed by Holloway to investigate the murder, Doyle finds himself being the prime suspect! Father Vernon, the local priest, is very helpful and caring in supporting Doyle, but could he possibly be withholding information?
The writing was rich in detail and description. Not just in what he saw, but also his opinions and perceptions of events and people. A wonderful mystery!
I received this book free from Kregel Publishers. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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Review 5 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5

Slow, Slow, Slow

Date:October 18, 2013
Customer Avatar
ThomasRFellerJr
Location:North Carolina
Age:35-44
Gender:male
Quality: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
I have always enjoyed Sherlock Holmes - one of my most prized books is The Complete Sherlock Holmes in facsimile of the original Strand publications given to me by my sister when I was a teenager. I've also enjoyed the TV and movie adaptations, including the modern BBC rendition Sherlock starring Gavin Cutterbatch. So when I saw this book appear in my blog tour listings I was intrigued to see what Martin Allison Booth could do.
Granted, the book is not about Holmes, and that was clear when I first signed-up to be a part of the tour. Instead, The Reichenbach Problem tells a fictitious story of Homles' creator Arthur Conan Doyle. It begins while Conan Doyle is on vacation in Switzerland, trying to escape the fame of being a well-known author. He is unable to find the rest or anonymity he craves, though, and soon gets thrown into a murder investigation himself.
In addition to reading the book because of the mystery component and its connection with Holmes, I was also excited because it was the first of a three-part trilogy - and I love getting into things at the beginning. Unfortunately, I was sorely disappointed. The book was slow to read (really slow) - to use the phrase "it was a yawner" is an understatement. I do plenty of reading late at night and during the day time (being in school and all), but this one consistently put me to sleep (literally). I just couldn't get into it - and it seemed like the even though I would keep turning pages I never got anywhere (in the book or in the story). Needless to say, I will not be reading the second two books in the series (assuming they even get published). This is not a book I would recommend and I'm giving it only 1/5 stars.
For the record, I did receive a free copy of the book from the publishers in exchange for an honest (though not necessarily favorable) review.
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Review 6 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Interesting book, but slow-paced!

Date:October 18, 2013
Customer Avatar
April E
Location:KS
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Sherlock Holmes is the world's greatest (fictional) detective of his time, but can his creator Arthur Conan Doyle solve mysteries? What if his life depended on solving the mystery and clearing his name? That's the premise of The Reichenbach Problem by Martin Allison Booth.
Doyle has grown weary of being recognized everywhere he goes, so he escapes to Switzerland for a respite. Unfortunately, he is joined on the train by a fan who ruins his chances of anonymity. If that were his only problem, however, he still could have had a relaxing holiday. Instead, a fellow traveler dies and Doyle is pushed into investigating it. Soon, he discovers that he is the primary suspect and he MUST solve the case in order to protect himself.
My Thoughts:
I wanted to like this book more than I did. I enjoy reading mysteries or other books where my favorite authors are placed as the protagonists. Maybe the problem is that I am not a big Sherlock Holmes fan. I haven't read one of Doyle's books, though I have enjoyed several Holmes movies (both modern and older). I never grew to sympathize with the character of Doyle in this book very much. I did dislike Holloway (the annoying fan) but I wasn't as invested in rooting for Doyle as I should have been. He just seemed too remote, too cerebral, and too self-absorbed for me to connect with. I suppose he is the typical stereotype of an English gentleman doctor of that era, though.
The beginning of the story is slow moving with lots of walks in the Swiss mountains and the village. Doyle meets many different people, eats, smokes his pipe, and thinks. His actions are detailed so carefully that I often was surprised that it was only lunch time in the story. That didn't really improve once he began to work the case, because then there were pages of him thinking - in his room, as he walked, as he hid (later in the book). I often found those passages tedious and skimmed them.
Two-thirds of the way into the book, it began to move more quickly, and held my attention better. Though one aspect of Doyle's escape from pursuit left me a little skeptical. It seemed too easy and implausible, and for once the story skimmed right over it instead of giving us the blow-by-blow. If more detail had been given, making it seem harder, it would have been more believable. The struggle just suddenly was over, in a stroke of apparent pure luck.
The mystery itself was good, and the solution was a surprise in the end. The characters I had been led to suspect weren't actually involved. I just didn't enjoy the first person narrative style, with so much detail of Doyle's thoughts and actions spelled out minutely. I guess most of the mysteries I read are written from a third person point of view.
I was surprised that this book wasn't as overtly Christian as I expected. (Though I have said that about several recent books written by British authors and published through Kregel over the past two years. Their style of Christian fiction is different from American authors.) To be honest, Doyle no longer believes in Christianity or the church. He is, however, willing to rationally consider whether or not spiritualism is real. This book does include a seance, for those who wish to avoid that, and one character believes he has been endowed with the spirit of the fictional Sherlock Holmes. Doyle does engage in a few spiritual conversations with a Franciscan monk who meets Doyle right where he is and accepts his doubts without seeming shocked. He seems to be slowly turning Doyle's mind back to God and planting seeds that might grow in future stories.
Although I personally found the book slow-moving and I didn't really connect with Doyle as much as I hoped to, I will look forward to reading more books by Martin Allison Booth starring Arthur Conan Doyle. Maybe now that I'm used to the style, I'll find it easier to read the next one. Even though it seems like I've shared negative things about the book, I did enjoy the mystery of The Reichenbach Problem. It just wasn't as fast, easy, or enthralling of a book as I usually read.
This book is published by Lion Fiction and distributed by Kregel Publications . I was given a free copy of the book in exchange for my honest review. All thoughts contained in this review are my own. No further compensation was given.
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Review 7 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

A very slow start; I hope it improves

Date:October 17, 2013
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A Cluttered Mind
Location:Rochester, MN
Age:55-65
Gender:male
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
I'm at a loss as to how best describe this book. After over 50 pages of dead-slow, pain-staking detailed descriptions of Conan Doyle unlikely 'traveling companion' I gave up. I will try to read on for I'm sure there must be good reading here. But, I would recommend to Booth that he do an opening Introduction or first chapter of some action and then return to Conan Doyle's trip to Switzerland. Get the reader's mind engaged in the suspense that will follow. Even tip the hand at something toward the outcome and leave the reader in suspense as to how the main character can possibly manage to pull off the solution. But please, don't keep going on and on and on about how tedious Holloway's presence is on this trip.
I once again find myself in a conundrum about how to recommend this book. It strikes me as a fascinating premise: take the creator/author of perhaps the most famous detective of all time and have him try to escape his stellar character's life out on his own only to find himself drawn into a mystery that can be solved by just one man: Sherlock Holmes. I love this premise. I could only wish that the pace started more quickly, then backed off a bit.
Also, as will have been pointed out in other reviews, while this book is published by Lion Fiction and distributed through America via Kregel, I still cannot classify this as primarily Christian fiction. This is one of those difficult topics: what makes a work of fiction distinctly Christian? I'm not looking for a highly theologized work of fiction. Yet I want something more obvious about the Christian faith once delivered set in the story line. Even if it is the main character struggling with his faith, having left a branch of the church, I don't care. Include that, talk about when that faith was more vibrant or something.
I won't not recommend this book, but I find it hard to commend to you at this time.
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Review 8 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

Date:October 17, 2013
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lcjohnson1988
Location:Indiana
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
Value: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
First of all, this book is marketed toward a Christian audience, but this is not a Christian book. There is talk of religion in the book, but that is almost a nonissue. This is a good, old-fashioned, Sherlock Holmes type mystery. I just want readers to be aware that if they are looking for Christian themes or a story of faith renewed, this is not that story.
Arthur Conan Doyle, the creator of Sherlock Holmes, can hardly go out in public due to his fame. Everyone he meets seems to expect him to act like Holmes instead of himself and is disappointed when he does in fact act like Doyle. He is scouting out a future vacation location for himself and his family, unwillingly encountering and obtaining a fan on the way who sticks to him like glue at first. They arrive at their destination and soon thereafter a body is found at nearby Reichenbach Falls.
Doyle’s seemingly erstwhile fan encourages him to investigate, even though Doyle just wants to get away from everyone. Doyle succumbs and begins searching for clues. In the course of his search, there is breaking and entering into a locked church, examining a body before authorities or medical personnel, a fire, a shooting, and a séance to name some of the happenings. Doyle’s fan becomes disillusioned with him and decides to investigate on his own. Meanwhile, Doyle continues his own case while continuing to deal with his own love/hate relationship with Holmes.
Doyle is portrayed as “falling away” from his Catholic upbringing, and investigates psychic phenomena for scientific purposes. He doesn’t out-and-out deny God, but leaves the door open for other avenues/beliefs. He also lusts after two women in the story, but supposedly is in love and completely devoted to his wife, which I certainly didn’t like. I’m against séances, but I do understand that during this time period many people participated in them, some for entertainment and some truly searching for answers. Seekers can only find answers through seeking the Source of all truth…God. I am a fan of historical and modern British mysteries, but I found this story difficult to get into. There were some great, English, dry witticisms, but they couldn’t make up for the slow pace of the book. There was too much dialogue and not enough action. This is the first book in a trilogy, but I won’t be reading the others in this series.
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Review 9 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Date:October 15, 2013
Customer Avatar
Galadriel
Age:18-24
Gender:female
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Conan Doyle is not Sherlock Holmes. And he's sick of people treating him that way. He just wants to get away from it, but his vacation to Switzerland is off to a bad start when he picks up an accidental traveling companion . It only gets worse when someone at the hotel where he's staying is found dead in the mountains--why, of course he'll want to investigate!
This book, although historical fiction, is not based on an actual incident. I've only read one other series of real person fiction, and that was closer to fantasy than historical fiction. The author notes the fictional elements in the preface, but the story itself should make it clear to readers that this never happened.
The mystery was well-written, with interesting characters and a consistent tone, but there were some elements of a modern worldview that snuck in. Doyle (admittedly, against the normal mindset) dismisses homosexuality as a live-and-let-live issue, and his religious views are very palatable to modern readers, though the latter may be closer to the trope. Also, some modern terms such as "whirling dervish" appear.
Overall, I think this novel is a decent read, but not historical realistic. 3/5
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Review 10 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Good Read

Date:October 15, 2013
Customer Avatar
The Happy Reader
Location:Columbia, TN
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
This look at Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is extremely interesting. Forced to look at his own literary creation and how, if he were to actually meet Holmes, how they would view and react to each other was the satisfying premise of this book.
Well written with just the right amount of detail, Mr. Booth takes us on a most interesting and thought-provoking ride into the psyche of what Doyle might have actually been like - as well as Holmes.
Doyle is a well-mannered gentleman who has the unfortunance to be hounded by the fan - or the fanatic - Holloway who haunts his every step on his much needed vacation away from the pressures of not only his celebrity status, but also of Holmes. Unable to accomplish either, he is unwillingly swept into investigating the death of poor Mr. Brown.
Written much like Doyle's Holmes stories, I found this book to be satisfying in almost every aspect. From the scenery to the end. I would recommend this to those who loved the Holmes stories.
*I received a complimentary book in exchange for my honest opinions. I was not required they be positive.*
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Review 11 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

Not my cup of tea

Date:October 14, 2013
Customer Avatar
S Scales
Location:Texas
Age:25-34
Gender:female
The Reichenbach Problem is the first book in the Reichenbach Trilogy. Martin Allison Booth spins a fictional tale of Conan Doyle, Sherlock Holmes’s creator. Doyle is overwhelmed by the changes that have occurred in his life due to the fame of his Holmes mysteries. Therefore he is now seeking peace in the mountains of Switzerland. However, that will not be! Instead, a death occurs, Doyle is basically forced into investigating, and then it seems like everything that could go wrong does for him!
We are introduced at the beginning of the book to Richard Holloway, who became a sort of leach to Doyle. He is an odd character that just seemed to rub me the wrong way. Honestly, I actually hoped he might be on the receiving end of this murder mystery, but he stayed full of life!! And yet he never gained any of my sympathy! Now Father Vernon was my favorite character in this book. He provided a balance to the craziness of the death, the other characters, and events, like a séance. He also gave so much effort, as in possible self-sacrificial, to help a stranger.
I was excited to start this series - my family is definitely mystery fans! However, I found it very slow in action until the last maybe 1/3 of the book. And what was lacking in action was made up for how much we heard from Doyle - in thoughts and words. Also, there seemed to be so much going on with all the characters that I found it hard to remember who was who. It just seemed like there was so much people drama that was pointless to the story (or at least to the story that was advertised on the back). In addition, there was an issue with a man’s sexuality that came out in the open during the story and caused a family problem that went throughout the book. (The way that Doyle figured out this was much too random?!) I wasn’t expecting this issue handled this way in a book that is published by a Christian publisher.
I don’t know?!... I find it very unpleasant to be so hard on any person’s creation. However, I do want to be honest, because that is what is required of a book reviewer or actually any reader because we invest our time, which is precious and limited, in each book we choose to read. I don’t plan to continue reading this series.
Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from Kregel Publications in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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Review 12 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

an interesting novel in the Holmes style

Date:October 14, 2013
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bookwomanjoan
Location:Oak Harbor, WA
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
I have enjoyed reading the Sherlock Holmes stories over the years, including the recent ones by Laurie R. King. Now there is a new author in the ring.
Well, sort of. This novel revolves around Conan Doyle, creator of the Holmes character. Needing time away from his popularity, he leaves his family for a couple of weeks' quiet in the Swiss mountains. On the train to his destination, an irritating Mr. Holloway attaches himself to Doyle, much to the author's dismay. The two arrive at the quiet village and Doyle settles in for a quiet time away from his notoriety.
As expected, there is soon a death that may be suspicious. A man has fallen (or was pushed) off the cliff at the Reichenbach Falls. Doyle is disinclined to make much of it but Holloway insists the duo find the truth behind the death. The investigation turns deadly when Doyle himself is accused of the murder.
Those who have enjoyed the Sherlock Holmes stories, both original and modern, will enjoy this novel yet be a bit frustrated by it. It was enjoyable to read a well written novel. Booth has a way with words. For example, upon Doyle experiencing a disappointment: “My heart returned to its customary place lying disconsolate upon the diaphragm.” (21) Booth has done an excellent job recreating the style of writing I liked so well in the Holmes stories.
The disappointment comes in that there are no clever clues and amazing deductions I've come to expect in this type of story. Doyle does discover clues and postulate theories, but nothing so striking as Holmes would have done. I was a bit disappointed that the author was not portrayed as clever as the character he had created.
Also, the novel is a bit long. At over 350 pages, I think it could have been tighter, with some of the scenes eliminated without destroying the story.
Nonetheless, it was an enjoyable book to read. If Doyle had made an amazing deduction or two, it would have been near perfect.
I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher for the purpose of this review.
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Review 13 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A Highly Entertaining Adventure Mystery

Date:October 13, 2013
Customer Avatar
VicsMediaRoom
Location:Irvine, CA
Age:55-65
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Martin Allison Booth in his new book “The Reichenbach Problem” Book One in The Reichenbach Trilogy series published by Kregel Publications introduces us to Arthur Conan Doyle.
From the back cover: "I was still not quite sure when, exactly, my disinclination towards people began. I know, though, that it had a great deal to do with the bane of my life - the great Mr Sherlock Holmes.'
Arthur Conan Doyle is on the run from his own fame and the impact it has had on his life. Having fled to a peaceful village among the mountains that house the Reichenbach Falls, he hopes to find the anonymity he needs to decide the destiny of his most popular creation.
Yet peace eludes him as he finds himself drawn into the mystery surrounding the death of a fellow tourist.
Who killed Peter Brown? What does the local priest know that he's not saying? What effect is Holmes having on Doyle's psychological state, and is it malignant?
Soon he finds the finger of suspicion is pointing at him, as the locals unite behind the troubled Holloway, who believes he is the embodiment of Sherlock Holmes.
A Sherlock Holmes story without Sherlock Holmes. Actually the hero of this story is the creator of Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle himself. A bit of history Mr. Conan Doyle had grown weary of Holmes and wanted to be rid of him so he wrote a story where Holmes and Moriarty both met their doom falling over Reichenbach Falls while Watson watched in horror. It is at this time of Mr Conan Doyle’s life that Mr. Booth takes us to. While visiting at Reichenbach Falls Mr. Conan Doyle finds himself embroiled in a murder mystery and he needs to solve it with all the mental powers of Holmes. This is great fun. Not only it is very interesting it is also very exciting. And the idea of a Holmes story without Holmes but with the creator of Holmes is quite an interesting concept. I liked this book a lot and look forward to the next book in the series!
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Kregel Publications. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Review 14 for The Reichenbach Problem, The Reichenbach Problem Series #1
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

very slow start

Date:October 13, 2013
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fictionbuyer
Location:Grand Rapids, MI
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
Value: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
Dear Readers,
I have always enjoyed reading the Sherlock Holmes books. I know Arthur Conan Doyle thought they were the worst thing he had ever written because they were what he considered trivial.
But those of us who read them and enjoy them don’t care. Many have been fans forever. I am sure you have noticed even if you are not a fan because of the TV shows, movies and books that Sherlock has starred in.
So when I heard about the Reichenbach Problem by Martin Allison Booth I was excited to read it and jumped at the chance to join the blog tour for it. I am sad to say that I did not enjoy it as much as I wanted to. The premise behind the book is that Arthur needs a break from Sherlock’s fans. He feels like he cannot walk down the street without someone asking him about Sherlock, commenting on his story or offering suggestions. He is sick of it and decides to vacation in Switzerland where he hopes to be able to hide out with no one knowing who he is.
The night he arrives in the small town he picked, a man has gone missing only to be found the next day dead. Conan Doyle gets involved because the other guests seem to think that because he is the writer of Sherlock he should be able to solve the mystery.
Over all it wasn’t a terrible read, just a little dry. As I told one person, it is a book that takes 300 pages to get going, the problem with that is there are 367 pages. Once the mystery got moving and Arthur seemed to be really working on the mystery (I don’t want to say what really happens if you want to read it) the book picks up pace and I really enjoyed it, but until then the characters were 2 dimensional and not interesting at all. Arthur comes across as a bit arrogant and seems to think only he can solve the mystery without anyone’s help.
So over all I will not be looking for Martin’s next book
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