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NavPress The Lost Virtue of Happiness: Discovering the Disciplines of the Good Life - eBook

Even in an age of instant gratification, life's best takes time and effort. What is happiness? The immediate gratification of our physical and emotional desires? A sense of satisfaction brought about through consumerism or other promises of short-term enjoyment?

Our twenty-first century views of happiness are not what the writers of the Bible had in mind. Nor is it what the ancient Greeks or the drafters of the Declaration of Independence envisioned. Such false ideas of happiness always leave us empty chasing the selfish and superficial.

Authors J. P. Moreland and Klaus Issler illustrate how we are only happy when we pursue a transcendent purpose--something larger than ourselves. This pursuit involves a deeply meaningful relationship with God through a selfless preoccupation with the spiritual disciplines. The Lost Virtue of Happiness takes a fresh, meaningful look at the spiritual disciplines, offering concrete examples of ways you can make them practical and life-transforming.

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Customer Reviews for The Lost Virtue of Happiness: Discovering the Disciplines of the Good Life - eBook
Review 1 for The Lost Virtue of Happiness: Discovering the Disciplines of the Good Life - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:November 16, 2009
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Cheryl Michael
A great book, very convicting in a positive personal way. It's message is encouraging and hopeful and long over due to the Christian community.
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Review 2 for The Lost Virtue of Happiness: Discovering the Disciplines of the Good Life - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:December 2, 2006
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Emily
This was an amazing book! The first two chapters were very eye-opening. Moreland writes that happiness should not be our goal in life, but rather, happiness is a side-effect of living virtuously. Moreland and Issler continue to write about the lost art of spiritual disciplines--these are life-changing. The stuff that is presented in here is so important for Christians to know. I give this book a two-thumbs-up, and I am definately going to pick out some more of Moreland's books to read!
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Review 3 for The Lost Virtue of Happiness: Discovering the Disciplines of the Good Life - eBook
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:July 27, 2006
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Joe
JP Moreland and Klaus Issler ransom the contemporary idea of happiness from the obsessive, authoritarian grips of pleasure-seeking narcissism, and cleanse it with biblical counsel, Spirit-led wisdom, pastoral insight, and the demonstrable lessons of their own life lived in the fellowship of others. Their thesis is articulated in eight life-empowering chapters, which claims that happiness is best understood and obtained if it means living our life as it is meant to flourish. We are meant to flourish in a life of character and virtue formation that manifests itself in wisdom, kindness and goodness (25). The life of Jesus Christ and the gospel of the kingdom of God are both the indispensable model and means for obtaining this kind of abundant life. Chapter One and Two both (authored by Moreland) establish this foundational claim. Chapter Three (Issler), Four (Moreland) and Five (Issler) form a unit to give clear instruction and pastoral insight about how to get good at living this kind of life: Namely, form a tender, receptive heart (ch. 3); form a thoughtful mind stayed on God (ch. 4); form a trustful will that risks with God (ch. 5). With the foundation laid in chapters one and two, and the edifice formed in chapters three, four and five, this house of edification is nearly complete. But first, Chapter Six (Issler) and Seven (Moreland) tests a biblical conception of human flourishing in light of the so-called hiddennes of God (ch. 6) and in view of experiencing anxiety and depression (ch. 7). These two chapters form a potent unit of instruction and insight, encouraging the reader to embrace the reality of Gods hiddenness and to learn not to just cope with anxiety and depression but to actually defeat its control over ones ability to flourish. I found these chapters to be liberating, helpful, and truthfully conveyed. Moreland openly shares his experience and defeat of anxiety and depression.
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