Christianbook.com Ratings and Reviews

Customer Reviews for Revell Under a Blackberry Moon

Revell Under a Blackberry Moon

Just a few days after she gives birth alone in the Northwoods, a recently widowed young Ojibwe woman stumbles into a nearby lumber camp in search of refuge and sustenance. Come summer, the camp owner sends Skypilot, his most trusted friend, to accompany Moon Song and her baby on the long and treacherous journey back to her people. But when tragedy strikes off the shore of Michigan's Upper Peninsula wilderness, Moon Song and Skypilot must depend on each other for survival. With every step they take into the forbidding woods, they are drawn closer together, until the tough questions must be asked. Will she leave her culture to enter his? Will he leave his world to enter hers? Or will they walk away from a love that seems too complicated to last?'
Average Customer Rating:
4.85 out of 5
4.8
 out of 
5
(20 Reviews) 20
Open Ratings Snapshot
Rating Snapshot (20 reviews)
5 stars
18
4 stars
1
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
0
20 out of 20100%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for Under a Blackberry Moon
Review 1 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:April 25, 2014
Customer Avatar
emily
Age:18-24
The story of Moon Song and Skypilot caught my interest from the beginning and maintained it until the end. I thoroughly enjoyed learning to know the characters, and I was very pleased that the author did not gloss over the difficulties that Moon Song and Skypilot faced in their relationship. This excellent tale of sacrificial love and devotion is poignant but not excessively mushy.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 2 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Riveting Historical Fiction!

Date:January 2, 2014
Customer Avatar
dianaFlow
Location:W Columbia, SC
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Riveting Historical Fiction!
In Under A Blackberry Moon, Serena Miller has penned an intriguing, haunting tale of a beautiful Indian woman who embarks on a perilous journey in the harsh, unforgiving Michigan wilderness to search for her family---and finds herself unwilling caught up in a seemingly ill-fated romance with a white man.
Moon Song, a young widow with an 8 month-old child, has been working in a lumber camp as a cook, and although she is treated with love and respect she feels it is now time to find her Chippewa family. Isaac Ross, better known by his nickname, Skypilot, decides to accompany Moon Song on her treacherous journey back to her people. As tragedy and the harsh elements in the wilderness draw Moon Song and Skypilot together, she finds herself unwillingly falling for the big, stalwart preacher/lumberjack. It is a love that can never be, however, as Moon Song realizes that many white men eventually leave their Indian families and the horrendous weather conditions in upper Michigan. Can this man and woman from two diverse cultures and beliefs overcome their adversities, or must each go their own way?
This is a fabulous book destined to become another award winner for Serena Miller! Filled with excitement, courageous characters, and a strong plot, this book is a treasure trove of knowledge of the Chippewa nation---their customs, skills, and hardships they had to endure. I was so impressed by the author's research and descriptive imagery, her strong, yet vulnerable heroine and hero, and a surprising twist or two thrown in at the conclusion...making this one of my favorite books of 2013!
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 3 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:December 9, 2013
Customer Avatar
Marbie
Location:The Netherlands
Age:35-44
Gender:female
When I heard that Serena Miller had written a story about the heroic character from The Measure of Katie Calloway – Skypilot – I knew I had to read this book. I loved Skypilot; his character, his hard-working nature, and how he was willing to sacrifice himself to save the life of Robert’s young daughter.
In Under a Blackberry Moon, Skypilot accompanies the native young woman, Moon Song, and her eight month old son from Jack’s lumber camp back to her tribe.
We were introduced to Moon Song in The Measure of Katie Calloway where she stumbled into Robert’s lumber camp. She was also the person who nursed Skypilot back to health. They developed a friendship during that time, but feelings are running a bit deeper than a mere friendship for Moon Song. She is trying to keep them under control, because she doesn’t believe that a white man will stay with a native woman over the long haul. She has seen that happen often enough in the tribes.
During their travel, tragedy strikes and lives are lost. Thankfully Skypilot, Moon Song, her son, and a white woman named Isabella survive. Stranded on a sandbank with no way to get off, Moon Song’s survival instinct kicks in. She leads Skypilot and Isabella to a safer place, meanwhile searching and preparing food.
Skypilot—big and strong as he is—has to rely on Moon Song to survive their trek through the wilderness of Michigan. His admiration for the woman grows into something more, but Moon Song doesn’t hesitate to turn him down. Will Skypilot find a way to win her heart?
What a wonderful story! I really enjoyed reading Moon Song and Skypilot’s adventure. Moon Song turned out to be an interesting woman; sensitive but tough. She knows what she wants and what needs to be done. Skypilot already stole my heart in The Measure of Katie Calloway and it was a delight to get to know him better and see how he held onto his faith and believes.
To make the story even more interesting, there were some unexpected twists and turns that kept me glued to the pages. The unforeseen surprise at the end kept me smiling long after I finished the book.
*Thanks to the publisher for providing me with a review copy through NetGalley.*
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 4 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Crossing the culture gap

Date:October 27, 2013
Customer Avatar
An Old Fashioned Girl
Location:Minnesota
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
To get the full picture of Under a Blackberry Moon, it helps to read The Measure of Katie Calloway first, which describes how Moon Song and Isaac Ross, commonly called Skypilot for his former profession of preacher, meet in a lumber camp, though Miller summarizes it fairly well in Blackberry. This novel picks up immediately where Katie Calloway leaves off, three years before the related A Promise to Love begins.
Lumberjack Skypilot is escorting Chippewa woman Moon Song and her infant son from the thumb of Michigan to her people on the western end of the Upper Peninsula. Traveling by steamboat is the quickest way, by route of the great lakes, but not exactly the safest. When the ship wrecks, they are left to traverse the rest of the way by foot through dangerous wilderness. Though they grow closer on the journey, they discover their cultures are an obstacle not easily overcome on the path to love.
As with her other novels, Miller has put in a lot of research. She does not skimp on how poorly Indians were treated: in general attitudes, in marriages, in the degradations by the government, in stealing their children to "educate" them. It was a horrible time for them, when the life they'd known for so long was taken away, setting a course that affects them to this day. In addition, she discusses the difficulties missionaries faced, since by then the Indians had received too many conflicting versions of Christianity from white men who professed Christ yet so often failed to agree with each other or show His love.
The book seems so simple straightforward when one reads the description - two people off on a long trip surviving adversity together, of course they fall in love! But it isn't simple; sure, they might be in love, but surviving all the shipwrecks and wolf attacks in the world together will not prepare one to give up everything one has known to live in another culture. Crossing that divide is no easy feat, as evinced by the multiple failures Moon Song has observed in her short lifetime. Miller has thoroughly thought through this aspect of the story and given it the emphasis it deserves. Culture gap is a huge issue that cannot be overcome simply by ooey-gooey romantic love - it takes serious work.
Once again, Serena Miller has written an excellent historical novel. The characters are flawed, but they grow significantly without ever bordering on unlikeable. I loved Skypilot, who makes an excellent hero; his devotion reminds me of Jacob laboring for Rachel. However, Moon Song's spiritual welfare is a priority for him, and no matter how much he wants to, he refuses to be unequally yoked in marriage. This book is a beautiful journey, full of adventure and determination. 5 out of 5 stars!
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
Review 5 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

history comes alive in this story

Date:October 22, 2013
Customer Avatar
Kathleen
Location:Missouri
Age:Over 65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Tuesday, October 22, 2013
Under a Blackberry Moon by Serena B. Miller, ©2013
To the real Moon Song
and her people.
--Serena B. Miller
I will never leave you nor forsake you.
--Joshua 1:5 NIV
In her village, each child was given a unique name by the village elders. There were no other Moon Songs. It was her name and hers alone.
The moon had been full the night she was born in her mother's tent. The elders heard her grandmother, Fallen Arrow, singing a soothing song to her new little granddaughter minutes after her birth, and that had been the root of her lovely name.
She was Moon Song, and she came from the wise Chippewa. Her grandfather had once been a great warrior and chief.
--Under a Blackberry Moon, 9
One Moon Song. After a ruckus on the boardwalk, she is leaving Bay City to return to her people, far north at Lake Superior. Without the law to protect her from rummaging drunks, she cannot stay. It is not safe for her to walk to get beads for her beadwork for her young son's moccasins ~ her Ayasha ~ "Little One." An elder in her tribe would choose his permanent name.
Isaac Ross ~ known as Skypilot, the name given him by his logging friends ~ their nickname for anyone who had ever been a preacher ~ knew Moon Song better than the others as she had taken care of him at the camp after his accident while rescuing a child.
Skypilot accompanies Moon Song and her young son to reach their village. Almost to her homeland, an explosion disrupts their plans and their direction. I struggled with them as they crossed the waters along the magnificent cliffs. Moon Song's skills keep them alive. Skypilot's quick actions keep them safe.
This is a fantastic book. So well plotted, history comes alive in this story. I found it interesting of the naming of the moons for the activities or happenings during each of the full moons, i.e. rice moon, berry moon, to keep track of the passing year. I enjoyed the story of Skypilot's wanting to learn her language and Chippewa ways, and appreciated Moon Song's dedication to her grandmother. Because of this honor, choices were made that benefited all of them. Trust and respect were values that carried them to freedom.
Serena B. Miller is the RITA Award-winning author of The Measure of Katie Calloway and A Promise to Love, as well as numerous articles for periodicals such as Woman's World, Guideposts, Reader's Digest, Focus on the Family, Christian Woman, and more. She lives on a farm in southern Ohio. Please visit serenabmiller.com for more.
***Thank you to Revell Blog Tour Network for sending me a review copy of Serena B. Miller's Under a Blackberry Moon. This review was written in my own words. No other compensation was received.***
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
Review 6 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Heartwarming and compelling historical

Date:October 20, 2013
Customer Avatar
Carole Jarvis
Location:Jonesboro, Georgia
Age:Over 65
Gender:female
Under a Blackberry Moon by Serena B. Miller is described as a sequel to her earlier novel, The Measure of Katie Calloway, yet it works perfectly as a stand-alone.
Serena is a new author to me and I must say that I loved her writing. With nicely-flowing prose and rich historical detail, Serena weaves a fascinating story with memorable characters and a compelling Native American theme.
Moon Song, "daughter of the lake country," and Skypilot, a former preacher in Virginia, are well-developed lead characters that I grew to love more with each page turn. Isabella and Jesuit priest Father Slovic are strong secondary characters who add much richness to the narrative.
Under a Blackberry Moon opens in the rugged lumber town of Bay City, Michigan in 1868. It's not long, however, before a tragic accident strands Moon Song, Skypilot and Isabella in the Upper Peninsula wilderness, where we see Moon Song's strength, courage, and natural survival skills. Skypilot reflects that . . . "In Bay City, she had seemed awkward and out of place . . . Watching her here was like watching a graceful doe melt into the shadows of the forest." This is a novel where the picturesque Upper Peninsula practically becomes a major character.
The Native American theme captivated me as Serena skillfully brought in not only the mistreatment they often received, but so much interesting detail about their way of life and religious beliefs. For instance, months of the year were given descriptive "moon" names - like "Blackberry Moon" for the month when blackberries ripen, "Falling Leaves Moon" for when the leaves fall, "Freezing Moon" for when the snows come, etc. And the women did what we would think of as a man's work, for . . . "A warrior would fight to defend his woman, but he would not lighten her load. That was the way it had always been."
One of my favorite parts in the book is a conversation between Skypilot and Father Slovic. Forced out of the ministry before the Civil War for publicly taking a stand against slavery, Skypilot had continued ministering to people in need. Father Slovic wisely tells him, "You never left the ministry at all. . . . You simply carried it with you. Living a life of service to others is the most powerful sermon of all."
The growing love between Moon Song and Skypilot is beautiful to watch, as it seems their differences might be insurmountable at first. "There was no way Skypilot could fit into her tribe, and she had already failed to fit into his." While the ending might turn out as one expects, how we get there is surprisingly creative and moving.
I thoroughly enjoyed Under a Blackberry Moon and will be reading more of Serena's novels. I highly recommend this story to all readers.
This book was provided by Lanette Haskins and Revell in exchange for my honest review.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 7 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

great book

Date:October 18, 2013
Customer Avatar
raison
Location:pa
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I could hardly put this book down. I had not read this author before but will definetly be looking for more books by her
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
Review 8 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Well worth reading!

Date:October 14, 2013
Customer Avatar
Julieanne Miller
Location:Oregon
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Serena Miller has titled her new book Under a Blackberry Moon, and has succeeded in writing a story that is both fun to read and educational. I was interested to read her descriptions of the lifestyle of the Indians and pioneers of the 1860’s in Michigan and the problems they faced.
Even though this was book two of the series, I never felt like I should have read book one first. However, I will read it as soon as I can get it; Under a Blackberry Moon was that good!
The story is written around Moon Song, a beautiful Indian girl with a very young baby boy; and Skypilot, a young man from the South. Moon Song and “Skypilot” are traveling on a steamboat to take Moon Song back to her people after the death of her husband, when the boat they are sailing in blows up. They - along with a white lady, Isabella - are the only survivors. However, in order to save themselves, they must make their way many miles back to civilization. How are two white people who have never lived “off the land” going to survive? Only with the help of a native Indian girl who has spent most of her life learning the skills that will mean their survival.
Ms. Miller describes the plight of the Indian tribes of this area as they were tricked into selling their land, and thus their means of survival, to the white man to occupy and mine for copper.
This is a book well worth reading and keeping for both the story and the historical information it contains. Ms. Miller has done a superior job accurately portraying the problems that both the white and Indian people faced. Her research and attention to details of life for these diverse groups of people living more than a century and a half ago not only make the story more interesting, but also educational. The unusual title Under a Blackberry Moon, will help you remember this book by Serena Miller.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 9 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Under A Blackberry Moon

Date:October 14, 2013
Customer Avatar
Brenda
Location:WV
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I enjoy reading historical fiction and when I learn that the story has historical truths woven in it really brings the story to life for me. "Under a Blackberry Moon" is the story of Moon Song and Skypilot. Moonsong was married to a white man and lived far from her tribe, when her husband dies she finds herself with a new baby alone, she finds her way to a logging camp where they take care of her, and when she decides to return home to her family it's Isaac Ross also known as Skypilot who decides to see her safely home. When something happens and they find themselves traipsing thru the wilderness will they be able to survive, and what about the feeling that are developing, is there any chance that love could work between them?
A riveting story where not only the characters come to life but the scenery as well. It was easy to imagine the difficulties that the characters faced. They characters were easy to connect with and Moon Song especially was someone that I found myself drawn to. The historical aspects of the story were very well done, the author brings to light the plight of Native Americans during this time period. Overall, I was drawn to the book because of the pretty cover but what I found inside was a historical story that was a bit unique because it revolved around a Native American heroine. An adventure to be certain, where the ending was sort of like I expected but still made for a satisfying read.
A complimentary copy of this book was provided for review.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 10 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

A Story of Acceptance and Forgiveness

Date:October 13, 2013
Customer Avatar
Rambling Reader
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Serena B. Miller shows readers another perspective of life in 1860s Michigan in "Under a Blackberry Moon." Moon Song and Skypilot are intriguing characters in "The Measure of Katie Calloway," and they have plenty of past and present experiences to fill the pages of their own novel. Although two of her previous books are set in Michigan as well, "Under a Blackberry Moon" ventures into the rugged wilds of the state and into Native American villages. I enjoy the fresh historical perspective that Miller brings into the plot with topics ranging from the dangers of early steamship travel to the plight of Native Americans.
Moon Song is a refreshing departure from the traditional heroines. As a Native American, she faces prejudices and misconceptions from strangers and even her close friends. Skypilot cares for and protects Moon Song from the beginning of the novel, but views her like an innocent and incapable child. Some of Moon Song's conversations and observations paint her into a more child-like character, so it is easy to view her as younger than her years. Throughout their shared adventure, she proves that she is a strong and brave woman and Skypilot begins to view her as such in his mind and heart. The romance is more about Skypilot's acceptance of Moon Song as a woman and Native American. The love story feels a little one-sided at times. It is clear that Skypilot desires marriage and is willing to work through the barriers to build a life together. While Moon Song shares his love, she doesn't seem as vested in a relationship. I like both characters, but I don't feel a complete emotional connection with them. Other parts also fall a bit flat for me as well. Moon Song's conversion to Christianity and her reconciliation with her past are pivotal events that are rushed at the end of the novel. Overall, "Under a Blackberry Moon" is a pleasant read with themes of love and acceptance and glimpses into a small segment of American history.
“Available October 2013 at your favorite bookseller from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group.”
I received a complimentary copy of this book from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions expressed above are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 11 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

An Amazing Story

Date:October 12, 2013
Customer Avatar
Dawn
Location:Houston, TX
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Moon Song is a young Chippewa widow who days after giving birth finds her way into a lumber camp. She spends the winter there and makes friends with Isaac Ross, known as Skypilot. When the summer arrives, the owner of the camp understands that for her own protection, Moon Song and her baby son need to be sent back to her people. Skypilot is asked to accompany her. While on the journey North, tragedy strikes and what was supposed to be a simple journey is now wrought with peril. As they travel together, both realize they have come to love the other. But there are obstacles in their way. Will she be forced to give up her world to live in his? Or will he give up his world to live in hers? Will they ever share the same faith?
Wow! That's really all I can say about this book. It started off rather slow, but things picked up when the tragedy struck Moon Song and Skypilot. The scenery in this book is truly breathtaking. And the way that the author has captured both of their struggles had me hoping that some way some how, the two would end up together.
Skypilot showed a strength in character that I've not seen a lot in the heroes of the books. He was determined to live his faith out. And to do all he could to obtain the trust of Moon Song's people. Moon Song for her part showed me a way of life I'm really not familiar with. The way that she went out of her way to ensure that her companions were able to survive showed the depth of her character as well.
There were many times while reading this book that I was reminded of a classic from my childhood, Island of the Blue Dolphins. I also was reminded at times of Jeanette Oke's book Drums of Change. It's been a long time since I've read either of those, but I was able to remember the struggles for survival that occurred in both books.
I really wasn't expecting to like this book the way that I did. Typically when a book starts off slow, I find myself having a hard time getting into it.
I received this book for free from Revell Books for the purpose of reviewing. My thoughts and opinions are my own.
Recommended to fans of Laura Frantz, Joanne Bischof, Jody Hedlund, historical fiction
Rating - 5 stars - It truly wowed me.
Available in October, 2013 from Revell Books a division of Baker Publishing Group.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 12 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Epic Look at romance and Chippewa culture!

Date:October 12, 2013
Customer Avatar
Veronica
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
This story is fascinating! Moon Song is such a strong character and Skypilot is a man to admire. It was amazing to read about Moon Song's strength and ingenuity and to learn more about her Chippewa heritage. There is so much adventure in this story. It felt almost epic as not only is there a romance, but also the story of the interactions between the Chippewa and the white man. I was already familiar with some of it, but also learned a lot. I liked that Skypilot's struggle over loving someone of a different faith was shown and how it was dealt with. If you like historical fiction, you should definitely check it out!
I received this book free from Revell in exchange for an honest review.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 13 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A Story of Change and Hope

Date:October 12, 2013
Customer Avatar
Blooming with Books
Location:Bloomer, WI
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Under a Blackberry Moon
By Serena B. Miller
Under a Blackberry Moon is an intriguing title and the book is as intriguing and captivating as the name that graces its cover. This is Moon Song's journey - a journey to discover her heart and a journey to rediscover herself.
Bay City, Michigan is no place for a woman. And a woman who is also an Indian is in even greater danger when the lumber camps emptied for the summer. The only place left for Moon Song is home - a journey of great distance and hundreds of miles that would take her across the state and through the forested wilderness.
But Moon Song's friends refuse to let her make this dangerous journey on her own. So Skypilot accompanies her and her nine month old son aboard a steamship. But something goes terribly wrong and soon they are fighting for their survival in the very wilderness that her friends wanted her to avoid. But a greater danger than the wilderness is lurking - the danger of a heart falling in love.
Moon Song can't fall in love with a white man. In Moon Song's experience white men always leave behind the Indian woman whose heart they've captured. And Skypilot is sure to break her heart just as her father broke her mother's heart and her own.
With her heart, her family, and her way of life at risk Moon Song is faced with a choice - a choice that could forever change her and all she holds dear. Sometimes the truths that we think we know are only half truths. Truths that are only one side of the whole and Under a Blackberry Moon is Moon Song and Skypilot's journey to discover the whole truth and their hearts.
Under a Blackberry Moon is a lovely book that looks at the issues that faced a people whose world was changing around them whether they wanted it to or not. Seen through the eyes of those who were being forced into being who they were not, this is book you won't forget!
I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher in exchange for my honest review.
Available October 2013 at your favorite bookseller from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 14 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A must-read for historical romance fans!

Date:October 12, 2013
Customer Avatar
Kristie
Location:upstate NY
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I was so excited to receive Serena B. Miller's latest historical romance novel, "Under a Blackberry Moon," to read and review. Serena has become one of my favorite historical fiction authors and her latest novel did not disappoint at all!
Moon Song is not truly accepted in town and although her friends hate to see her go, they also fear for her safety. When Skypilot offers to escort her and her young son back to her tribe, Robert and Katie are thrilled, thinking this is for the best, although Moon Song would just rather walk there herself. As they set off on their journey things do not go as planned and they are forced to depend on each other and in the midst of all these they realize that there is more to their relationship than just mere friendship. However, Moon Song and Skypilot are both from different worlds and cultures and each have their own baggage as well.
I really enjoyed "Under a Blackberry Moon!" I have loved these books that started out with Katie joining Robert's camp as a cook and later as his wife and continuing on with other individuals from the camp as the main characters. This is an unusual setting for books (at least to me based on the ones I have read!) and I find the setting and time period fascinating and I become so immersed in the characters' lives. I am looking forward to future novels from this author!
“Available October 2013 at your favorite bookseller from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group.”
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 15 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

a wonderful, sweet story with power and depth

Date:October 12, 2013
Customer Avatar
VicsMediaRoom
Location:Irvine, CA
Age:55-65
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Serena B. Miller in her new book “Under A Blackberry Moon” published by Revell Books takes us into the life of Moon Song.
From the back cover: Which wilderness is more treacherous–the one she must cross to find her home . . . or the one she must traverse to find love?
Just a few days after she gave birth alone in the northwoods, a recently widowed young Chippewa woman stumbled into a nearby lumber camp in search of refuge from the winter snows. Come summer, it is clear that Moon Song cannot stay among the rough-and-tumble world of white lumbermen, and so the camp owner sends Skypilot, his most trusted friend, to accompany her on the long and treacherous journey back to her people.
But when tragedy strikes off the shore of Lake Superior, Moon Song and Skypilot must depend on each other for survival. With every step they take into the forbidding woods, they are drawn closer together, until it seems the unanswerable questions must be asked. Can she leave her culture to enter his? Can he leave his world to enter hers? Or will they simply walk away from a love that seems too complicated to last?
Get swept into a wild realm where beauty masks danger and only the truly courageous survive in a story that will grip your heart and your imagination.
I like history and ”Under A Blackberry Moon” is filled with history. I feel that there are not enough stories that detail the hard life and indignities that the Native American People had to endure. Some of the scenes in this book will tear out your heart and make you want to cry if not really cry (I guess that depends on whether or not you are male or female). This is all about a journey home, to find where you truly belong and with whom. I think Ms. Miller has done an outstanding job of bringing Moon Song to life. Wow, what a superb character with such depth. And Skypilot is another person that I would have loved to really know. ”Under A Blackberry Moon” is filled with action and adventure. It is filled with family and overcoming adversities. I think that “Under A Blackberry Moon” is a winner! Ms. Miller has given us a wonderful, sweet story with power and depth that will keep you flipping pages. I liked it a lot and look forward to more from this talented author.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Revell Publishers. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
Available October 2013 at your favorite bookseller from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 16 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Under a Blackberry Moon

Date:October 11, 2013
Customer Avatar
lauren
Under a Blackberry Moon, by Serena B. Miller, continued the story of Moon Song who was originally introduced in the book The Measure of Katie Calloway. Moon Song had given birth to a young child when alone in the woods, and she stumbled into a lumber camp where Katie Calloway was the cook. Soon, she finds herself on her way back to her home with the Chippewas with Skypilot, a man she helped nurse back to health after an accident at the lumber camp. They face many different obstacles as they are traveling, and it was great to see their interaction with each other and their faith grow throughout the book.
I really enjoyed this book, and I was happy to read more about Skypilot since I really enjoyed his part in The Measure of Katie Calloway. The book was an easy read, and can be read as a stand-alone book, but I would recommend reading the first book in the series so you can understand the history the main characters had with one another.
Available October 2013 at your favorite bookseller from Revell, a division of Baker Publishing Group.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Revell. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: "Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising."
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 17 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:October 11, 2013
Customer Avatar
sunny island breezes
Location:a sunny island
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I’m glad to have had the chance to get to know some of the characters from The Measure of Katie Calloway a little better. The members of the lumber camp are staying in Bay City until the next opening of the camp.
Bay City hasn’t been all that good for Moon Song. It’s been decided that Skypilot will accompany her and her baby back to her tribe to make sure she arrives safely.
It turns out that is wasn’t as easy a trip as they thought it would be. It turns out that it was downright dangerous. Adding to the physical danger was the danger to their hearts.
As they continued to travel, they began falling in love. That’s a major problem. She can’t live in the white man’s world, but can he live in her world? It appears that love will lose out, but can Skypilot really give her up?
I enjoyed this book, but one thing bothered me a bit. In 1898, Slovenia was actually part of Austria. So, even though Father Slovic was a Slav, he would have been born and raised in Austria.
***A special thank you to Lanette Haskins for providing a review copy.***
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 18 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:October 10, 2013
Customer Avatar
lcjohnson1988
Location:Indiana
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Under a Blackberry Moon is a work of historical fiction that will reach beyond the words and touch the heart of the reader. One aspect of historical fiction that makes the story rich is the research the author does to include facts uncovered while preparing to tell a tale. Sometimes in the reading for preparation of the novel change can occur in the characters, plot, and even changes in the direction of the story.
Serena B. Miller writes a novel placed in the 1700s-1800s about a particular Native American tribe, with the main character from that tribe being Moon Song. Moon Song is the daughter of an eastern magnate and her mother was a Chippewa Indian. During one harsh winter shortly after Moon Song gives birth, she walks into a lumber camp weak and malnourished with her baby boy. As time goes on, Moon Song develops friendships with white people from the camp who care for her, love her and help her return to her village very far away.
Skypilot was born with the name Isaac and used to live in the South prior to the Civil War. Isaac was a minister who was engaged, but life for him went to pieces when he took a stand against slavery. With his faith and life in shambles, he works at the lumber camp when Moon Song arrives. Now, the season for logging is on break for a few months, so he eagerly volunteers to make sure Moon Song gets back home safely. From here on out the story begins to take off and suspense fills the pages as the adventure to take her Moon Song home runs into unexpected obstacles. The adventure includes surviving a steam ship trip gone awry; a visit from a wolf pack and finding out just much one person can endure.
One of the themes in the novel is learning to love selflessly, which sounds easy, but is not. Will Moon Song ever understand or embrace the “white man’s” religion when her past holds such brokenness? How is Isaac ever going to be an example of Christian love when he cannot know the life and ways of the Chippewa? There are many other colorful characters in the story that will enrich readers’ minds and occasionally cause burst out loud laughing. I loved this book as it reminded me of what selfless love really is and how it can be lived out before others who are watching us even if we aren’t aware.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 19 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Walking With God

Date:October 8, 2013
Customer Avatar
MaureenT
Location:Syracuse NY
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I loved this story, and felt I was walking with them. The descriptions of the tundra was so wonderful, and breath taking.
After recovering her health Moon Song is now strong enough to begin her trip home to her people the Chippewas, and Skypilot has chosen to take her back safely. For Skypilot, his feelings for Moon Song become deeper as they travel.
This is one action packed story, it seems there is a disaster around each corner, and when things start to calm down, it is not to be. Loved how God has his hand placed on them. Also who couldn't love that baby...so good, never cries. There is also a lot of heartache and some unnecessary loss of life.
The luck of being stranded with a smart Indian woman, her survival skills amazed me. She sure had a lot of energy. This is a story not to be missed, we learn that some of the Indian beliefs are the same as Christian, but will Moon Song accept Jesus? Skypilot needs a wife, but cannot be unequally yoked.
Come along on this great adventure, you sure won't be disappointed!
I received this book through The Revell Blogger's Tour, and was not required to give a positive review.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 20 for Under a Blackberry Moon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Undera Blackberry Moon

Date:October 5, 2013
Customer Avatar
Laura Hilton
Location:Horseshoe Bend, AR
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Which wilderness is more treacherous--the one she must cross to find her home . . . or the one she must traverse to find love?
Just a few days after she gave birth alone in the north woods, a recently widowed young Chippewa woman stumbled into a nearby lumber camp in search of refuge from the winter snows. Come summer, it is clear that Moon Song cannot stay among the rough-and-tumble world of white lumbermen, and so the camp owner sends Skypilot, his most trusted friend, to accompany her on the long and treacherous journey back to her people.
But when tragedy strikes off the shore of Lake Superior, Moon Song and Skypilot must depend on each other for survival. With every step they take into the forbidding woods, they are drawn closer together, until it seems the unanswerable questions must be asked. Can she leave her culture to enter his? Can he leave his world to enter hers? Or will they simply walk away from a love that seems too complicated to last?
Get swept into a wild realm where beauty masks danger and only the truly courageous survive in a story that will grip your heart and your imagination.
UNDER A BLACKBERRY MOON is the sequel to The Measure of Katie Halloway, but it easily stands alone. I enjoyed getting reacquainted with Skypilot, the preacher-turned-logger, and Moon Song. At first, Moon Song is out of place in Bay City, Michigan, but when she and Skylark ended up stranded in the wilderness she was the strong one with the skills to survive.
I enjoyed seeing Moon Song find herself, and appreciated that Skypilot was able to remain strong and courageous while clearly out of his league. I wondered how these two would work everything out.
The storytelling is not as good in this book as it was in Ms. Miller’s previous books set in Michigan. It is stiff, and doesn’t allow us to get into Skypilot’s head as much as I would’ve liked. Moon Song was very well developed. However, it is still a book I enjoyed, full of Michigan history, and vivid descriptions. Recommended. 4.5 stars, rounded up to 5.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.