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WaterBrook Press The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love

A dynamic guide to qualities that make the 21st-century congregation "work"! In this "next chapter" to his best-selling The Blessed Life, the pastor of one of America's fastest-growing churches shows how every component of ministry can benefit from God's blessing---from mission, church government, preaching, and teaching to worship, small groups, giving, and outreach. 224 pages, hardcover from Waterbrook.
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Customer Reviews for The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love
Review 1 for The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love
Overall Rating: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5

Flawed, Muddled, and Contradictory

Date:May 5, 2013
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Cliffymania
Location:Michigan
Age:35-44
Gender:male
Quality: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
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1 out of 5
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1 out of 5
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Usually the words “church” and “secret” don’t go together. Unless you’re attending one of Brooke Hill’s Secret Church events, but that’s entirely different. When Jesus spoke about the church he was very open and honest about what it should be and what it should do. There was no secret. If you believe Jesus Christ is Lord and the God raised Him from the dead then go and make disciples. Gather together with other believers, worship God, teach the word, and act like Christ by serving the community and taking the gospel to them. Not complicated and requires very little monetary investment.
Enter the 21st century and the nearly ubiquitous mega-church. It used to be that mega-churches were few and far between, but now it seems like every town has one. Networks are springing up that will virtually allow you to buy a church franchise in a box. Just add a band and a gifted speaker and you are on your way to making a mega-church. It’s a very expensive way to build a church and apparently a lot more complicated.
It spawned a whole new genre of books; the church growth genre.
For the last 30 years Rick Warren and his book the Purpose Driven Church had the corner on the market of how to build and grow a modern church. Now there’s a new kid on the block, Robert Morris. Morris started Gateway Church in 2000 and, according the book, boasts 24,000 active members.
So what can we learn from Robert Morris? What is the “secret” to growing a church?
A Blessed Church is a Mega Church
Large churches that grow quickly, whatever quickly means, have often been accused of doing something worldly in order to grow their churches. It usually runs along the lines of delivering feel-good messages, or making the service all show and no substance, or simply promising prosperity.
“Any kingdom ruled by Jesus would be healthy. And healthy things grow!”
The current crop of mega-church pastors has caught on to this and developed a new argument: healthy things grow. Morris follows right along with this train of thought.
“ I’ve met thousands of entrepreneurs and business owners in my years in ministry. And in all that time I’ve never met one who, after choosing to endure all the hardship and labor and risk required to bootstrap a business, hope that his business would stay small and insignificant. I’ve never talked to a farmer who – after buying seed on credit, toiling diligently day after day preparing the soil, planting, fertilizing and irrigating – didn’t pray that God would send all the rain and sun necessary to produce a bumper crop. Coaches want their team to win. Architects want to see their buildings built and utilized=. Writers want their books to be read by as many people as possible. God made us want to bring increase. Given that truth, I’m not sure why we’re supposed to be shocked or offend when someone who is called and equipped to shepherd a flock has a desire to see that flock grow healthy and to multiply, many, many times over.”
Like so many mega-church pastors Morris’ makes the mistake of comparing the Church to a man-made endeavor. Of course God wants the Church to grow. The Parable of the Soils in Matthew 13 is proof that God wants the Church to grow. In Matthew 28:19 Jesus says, “Go and make disciples of all nations.” That’s everybody.
However, I can’t help but notice that when the church is treated like a business it tends to model the Tower of Babel rather than the New Testament church. The mindset of the mega-church pastor seems to be to bring everyone under one roof (Genesis 11:3-4). The mindset of God seems to be, everybody spread out (Genesis 11:8, Acts 5:42, Acts 20:20). There are particular problems that plague large businesses; they are unable to adapt quickly to market changes. The sheer size of the organization makes it economically difficult. Smaller business are often able to change course very rapidly to meet the needs of their clientele because there is less infrastructure to manage. Gateway is one church of 24,000 people. What if it were 6 churches of 4,000? Wouldn’t they be able to better meet the needs of their particular area? What if it was 24 churches of 1,000? Think how much greater an impact they could have on their individual communities.
Blessed Church hears from God clearly…sort of…maybe…maybe not
Morris believes that he clearly hears from God.
“When I attune the ear of my heart to his voice, He speaks to me very precisely and with great detail, just as my wife or any other intimate friend of mine speaks.”
Even his wife believes he hears from God clearly because she asked if he would teach her how to hear from God. In a section on paying attention to family he records his wife’s question.
“Well, as long as I’ve known you, you’ve heard the voice of God so clearly. Do you think…if you have time…? I know you’re busy, but do you think you could teach me how to hear God like you do?”
It’s this gift to hear from God clearly that led Morris to enter the ministry and start Gateway church and even name Gateway church. He even compares this gift to Moses hearing from God. However, later on in the book, after explaining how God so clearly speaks to him, Morris explains that it’s still open for discussion.
I can’t walk into our [elder’s] meeting with a posture that basically suggest, “Guys I think God wants us to do xyz, but I’ll relinquish the idea if you can find a way to pry it out of my white knuckled grip.” And I certainly can’t suggest that because I believe I’ve heard from the Lord that there is no room for discussion or alternative viewpoints.
That’s confusing to me because when Moses heard from God it wasn’t open to debate. My question for Morris is very simple: Are you hearing from God, or not? If you are, why is it being questioned? If you’re not then why are you saying you are?
It’s this kind of confusing mish-mash of ideas that makes me think Morris isn’t being completely honest in his advice.
A Blessed Church has a humble pastor with a big ego
These are a few quotes that Morris makes in reference to his position at Gateway.
“In the end, the Lord has made it clear that He wants the Gateway story told because it’s His story – not because we’ve done everything right, but rather because He has accomplished something special in spite of our weaknesses and mistakes.”
“In each instance [Moses and Paul] god uses a singular head to establish the vision, values, and direction of the [church]” pg 133
“As the singular head, I’m not passive about the direction of the church. I lead.” pg 136
“We believe the senior pastor should be the uncontested leader of the church on a daily basis.” pg 153
The Wrap Up
When all is said and done The Blessed Church is a muddled mess. Morris claims to hear clearly from God, but don’t hold him to that. Morris claims that God gives a vision and then later claims that pastor defines the vision. Morris says the church should be led by unanimous consent of pastor and elders but then says the senior pastor is the uncontested leader.
Chapter after chapter I found myself asking the same question: So, which is it?
Then again, the flawed theology, feign at humility, and the boasting about numbers is more than enough to throw this book out entirely.
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Review 2 for The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Good Book for a Ministry Refresher

Date:April 11, 2013
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Starla
Location:Cincinnati, Ohio
Age:18-24
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
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4 out of 5
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4 out of 5
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In The Blessed Church, Robert Morris writes to share why Gateway Church does what they do, followed by the "what" of how they follow through with method. To do this, he distinguishes the book into six parts: 1) The Gateway Story, 2) Blessed Vision, 3) Blessed Shepherds, 4) Blessed Leaders, 5) Blessed Government, and 6) Blessed Church Culture. Morris explains the church functions in each of these categories, along with the theology and reasoning behind the functions. For each, he digs into Scripture and shows the biblical root for the process.
Morris's writing is easy to read, which makes this book a fairly quick read and simple to understand. It could be a good book to have on a church leader's shelf as it has helpful ideas and refreshing reminders. However, no leader should walk away from this as the model for "how to lead a healthy, growing church." Is it helpful for thinking and developing theology and practices? Yes. While my approach to ministry is not entirely the same as his, it's always good to think from a different angle. I appreciate that Morris has a strong belief in the primacy of Scripture and the need to listen to the Holy Spirit at all times in the Christian walk.
My only two nitpicks are the following. 1) Morris does not always show sufficient exegesis and interpretation of Scripture. Sometimes he jumps straight from Scripture to interpretation without adequately showing how he got to the interpretation from the study of Scripture. However, this may be due to the nature of the book in that the purpose is essentially to tell Gateway's story and now to write a commentary, so in order to keep the book simple, Morris may have simplified his study process. 2) Morris communicates strictly a male-only church leadership model. I do not know if he rejects woman church leaders and pastors, but it would seem so from his writing.
Overall, The Blessed Church is a good read. Though I wouldn't put it on my "Books Every Pastor Should Read" list, I'd recommend it to those who are wanting a quick read with simple truths that helps fan your passion for ministry.
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Review 3 for The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Focus on health rather than growth

Date:March 11, 2013
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AlandWynda
Location:Minot, ND
Age:35-44
Gender:male
Quality: 
4 out of 5
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Not serving as a Pastor or Elder of a church, I was curious as to how I would relate to Robert Morris' book. On the practical side the author keeps most of the chapters short, trying to hone in on just one point with some supplemental information. He also does not use much jargon or 'insider vernacular.' That keeps the language simpler. The combination of the short chapters and language makes this book easy to read.
While readers may not agree with every concept the author presents, I think the overall point he tries to make is one that every church can benefit from. That point is that local churches should focus on health rather than growth.
I received a free copy of this book from Waterbrook Multnomah in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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Review 4 for The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A great book for all church members!

Date:March 11, 2013
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sherrijinga
Location:Georgia
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
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“Whether you are a pastor, a volunteer, or a church member, you want your church to grow well.” You want a healthy church. But what does a healthy church look like and how do you turn your church into one? The Blessed Church by Robert Morris can help you!
I work in women’s ministry in my church and have worked with women, youth, and children all throughout my adult life. I’ve even been a church secretary. One thing I have learned is that there are many things that can make a church unhealthy. There are many things that will kill a church.
We are all ministers and when we adopt that mindset and realize that we all share a common goal of reaching the lost for the Lord, we will learn how to put the things aside that divide us. In this book, Robert Morris explains how he and his church members have fostered growth within their body.
In the book, Mr. Morris states that “God made us to want to bring increase.” It’s natural for us to want to grow. He says, “Writers want their books read by as many people as possible.” That rang true in my heart. This book made me realize that as important as book sales are to me, having a healthy, thriving church is equally as important.
We can use many strategies and have the best intentions to make this health come to our churches, but “it all comes down to the motivation and attitudes of our hearts.” Our goal must be to feed the sheep. If you’ve ever been in a church that won’t grow no matter what, it might be time to stop and assess things.
Sometimes churches grow in number but then things level out or fall. Why is that? Well, the parable of the seed tells us that the soil a seed grows in determines whether or not it’s fertile enough to sustain the test of time. “Healthy things grow. Growth without real health is unsustainable. If you want growth, pursue and monitor health.”
Churches sometimes try so hard to reach people and to make them stay once they arrive that they water things down. They try to make the Word of God palatable. They don’t want to step on toes. But, as this book says, “Unbelievers are attracted to, not repelled by, the power and presence of God. Spiritually hungry seekers are looking for something authentic and transformative—something bigger than themselves.” I’ve always felt like if someone walks into the doors of the church for a church service, then that person is seeking God. So why not give him what he’s looking for?
“A pastor’s job is to train up everyday evangelists and send them out, filled with the Word and the influencing power that comes from having been in God’s presence.” How exciting for a pastor to be able to preach to his congregation words of empowerment to send them out to conquer the world for God—and offer words to the seeker at the same time.
The book also speaks of the importance of the pastor having a vision and then casting that vision before his people. “A vision starts with an individual. In scripture, God didn’t impart vision to a committee. He spoke to an individual and called that person to communicate the vision clearly to others. Visions can only be accomplished by a team.” This shows how important each person within the church is. We’re all needed to accomplish the goal.
“A vision God can bless is a vision you allow Him to give you. It will require both great faith and holy audacity to receive it.” If you believe God has a bigger plan for you and your church, then be ready for him to bless you.
Here’s a few things Mr. Morris shares in regards to a pastor’s role:
• A pastor’s role is to feed the sheep. He should spend more time feeding than leading. People can’t go into battle malnourished. They must be fed.
• The wrong kind of shepherd will actually scatter the sheep.
• A true shepherd’s heart burns to see people helped and fed and matured and equipped.
• A shepherd who doesn’t care about these things will see his church get smaller.
• A true shepherd leads by example. He models where he wants his sheep to go.
“Only Jesus can call and gift true shepherds.”
Mr. Morris stresses the fact that pastors must include their families with them in ministry. They must not sacrifice them to the demands of ministry. “They must be good husbands and fathers first. They can’t be truly blessed leaders any other way.” Pastors must stay in the Word, pray, and raise up leaders so they will not have to do everything alone.
One thing Mr. Morris said really stuck out to me. He said, “Hold onto what God has given you with an open hand.” If you know that God owns everything and that He allows us to use them and have access to them for His purposes, then it’s easier to hold your hand open and ask Him to do with you and your resources whatever He wants to. You will soon see that you have even more than you started out with. With this attitude, not only will you be blessed, your family and your church will be, as well.
“Church is not about observing God. Or learning facts about God. It’s about experiencing God.” When we connect with a solid community within our churches, serve the Lord with gladness, commit our lives and our ministries to Him, blessings will abound.
I received a free copy of this book from Waterbrook Multnomah in exchange for a fair and honest review.
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Review 5 for The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Fantastic book

Date:January 24, 2013
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Justin
Location:Denver
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
4 out of 5
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4 out of 5
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I’m not entirely sure where to start with Robert Morris’ book The Blessed Church, there are many fascinating and insightful points that I should bring up to do it justice. I suppose then, the best thing I can do up front is is give it a wonderful endorsement. If you get this book as a pastor or leader in your church (or for a pastor or leader in your church), you won’t be disappointed. Morris writes from the heart and passionately argues for a clearly defined vision from the Senior Pastor while simultaneously recognizing the importance of a team method to leadership and accountability. Any church or leader in need of motivation on how to become a good leader and vision caster must read this book.
What makes Morris book so helpful is that he covers it from so many different angles. He covers early on what it looks like to capture and create a vision from God; moves later into the characteristics, attitudes and beliefs that one needs to have in order to lead; the role, duty and function of a pastor (with particular emphasis on the lead or senior pastor; church politics and governance; and closes it off by looking at the importance of culture.
One of the important things Morris did for me as a reader was to tow a line well in humility. As a pastor of an extremely large church, it can be tempting to just give a list of prescriptions that instructions that must be followed so you can be successful ‘like him.’ Another similar temptation is to brag about the successes of your particular church. Morris, while making frequent use of phrases like, “I don’t say this to brag but...” comes of as believable and humble. He isn’t saying it to brag, he has a genuine heart and wants to help other pastors capture God’s vision for his church and how that needs to be implemented.
Morris gift of writing is clear, passionate and persuasive. This book is birthed out of prayer and is a must read for any church struggling with vision, purpose, direction and effectiveness.
Disclaimer: I reviewed a free copy of this book through the BloggingForBooks program offered by WaterBrook Multnomah publishing. I was in no way compensated for this review and all views are solely and completely my own. I was not required to offer a positive review either through the publisher or author.
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Review 6 for The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Extremely practical

Date:January 15, 2013
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pastor les
Location:Williamston,MI
Age:Over 65
Gender:male
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
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4 out of 5
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4 out of 5
I found this author to be very practical and Biblical in his approach.Even tho he pastor's a mega-church,his teaching can be applied to many Churches. I don't believe he is aware that the average church in America today is under 100 in attendance,thus the average church may struggle with many of his princiiples.
His principles are Biblical,HOWEVER I cannot without reservations recommend the book due to some abberant theology.He believes there are still apostles for example.His charismatic theology I fear overshadows the great principles he is able to share. Approach the book with this in mind and one can benefit a great deal.
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Review 7 for The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Date:January 14, 2013
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Dr JSK
Age:45-54
Gender:male
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
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2 out of 5
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The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love, written by Robert Morris, is a book that seeks to bring a conceptual design regarding church growth.
The idea behind this publication is commendable. Who wouldn't want their church to grow? But its content carries the reader along a path of confusion. While trying to convey a model to follow, Morris uses the model for his own church, Gateway Church, which sounds more like a corporate run business than a Biblically run church. In fact, Morris implies that a church should not be afraid to sounding somewhat corporate.
When addressing what he considers church government, Morris turns to an unusual example to follow from the Old Testament: Moses. In fact, Morris quite often refers to the Old Testament in an attempt to solidify his idea of church structure. In doing so, he evades the leadership model of the New Testament, which does not allow for the minister to be the final authority, which appears to be what Morris prefers.
To purchase this book or not, that seems to be the question. My suggestion would be to find some time to sit at your local bookstore/coffee house and read enough of the book to formulate your own opinion on purchasing it or not.
Dr. Jeff Krupinski
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Review 8 for The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

How To Keep The Church Alive and Vibrant

Date:November 11, 2012
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VicsMediaRoom
Location:Irvine, CA
Age:55-65
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
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Robert Morris in his new book, “The Blessed Church” published by Waterbrook Press gives us The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love.
From the Back cover: How can I help my church stay focused on its purpose?
What would a culture of generosity look like for my church?
What part does rest play in a healthy church?
Whether you are a pastor, a volunteer, or a church member, you want your church to grow well. After all, there’s no better place to experience God than in the loving, healthy community of a church. But what does an effective church look like? Is it possible to grow and be healthy at the same time?
Pastor Robert Morris has experienced firsthand the spiritual and relational excitement of a growing, dynamic church. In The Blessed Church, Pastor Morris brings you practical wisdom for cultivating real growth by nurturing true and Biblical health in your spiritual community.
The Greek word for church is “ecclesia” which means, “called out ones”. When he speaks of “church” Pastor Morris is not referring to the building but to the people that make up the body of believers. Wherever it is you attend “The Blessed Church” will help bring health and vitality. In six sections Pastor Morris shows us areas where we can ignite health: The Gateway Story, Blessed Vision, Blessed Shepherds, Blessed Leaders, Blessed Government, Blessed Church Culture. Pastor Morris walks us through what we need to know so that health can begin in us and spread throughout the body of believers and into our neighborhoods. Pastor Morris does a much better job in his book, “The Blessed Church” than I ever will. I recommend reading this book. You will be blessed.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book for free from Waterbrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Review 9 for The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

Save your time and money for a better book ...

Date:October 20, 2012
Quality: 
2 out of 5
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"The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love" is the misleading subtitle of the latest book by Robert Morris titled "The Blessed Church."
The subtitle is misleading because there aren't any secrets in the book, but maybe the publisher can sell more books if the idea that there is a secret inside is claimed on the cover.
Instead of a secret, the content revolves around Morris telling the story of the church he started, Gateway Church located in the north Dallas area. With more than twenty thousand members, Gateway has experienced phenomenal growth, and apparently that is the primary reason this book was written. In today's church, developing a massive mega church in a relatively short period of time is the measure of stardom for preachers.
In that case, Robert Morris has achieved stardom in the church. But not based on the content of this book.
"The Blessed Church" is another familiar story from the "new establishment" within the modern American church comprised of popular pastors made celebrities because of the sheer size of the ministries they lead and their involvement in the speaking circuit of conferences for church leaders.
In sharing about "doing church" in our time, Morris draws heavily from Old Testament scripture, rarely looking at the actual model and instruction for the church we find in the New Testament. In fact, when addressing leadership and "church government," Morris again turns to the Old Testament and looks to the leadership of Moses as a primary example church leaders can follow. Morris advocates a "singular headship and plural leadership" model for church government, but his description of the actual role for elders make it clear he believes the pastor is in charge and describes very little actual authority or responsibility for elders.
Morris increasingly uses a corporate vocabulary in describing leading his church and even notes that himself, then responds to it by saying we should not be afraid of sounding corporate. Thus, he routinely refers to church leadership as leading an organization. Morris will later write a sentence that the church is more than an organization, it is the body of Christ and the family of God, but then moves on to talk about the vital need to develop community in the church rather than focusing on the fact that developing family ties between brothers and sisters in Christ is vastly more intimate than any concept of "community." After all, the church is not a community, it is Christ's body and God's family.
Morris also speaks about the need to "experience God." The problem with that is, God is not an experience! He is a Person who feels, and sees, and hears, and is to be interacted with. He's not a ride at some amusement park that a person "experiences." He is a Person to know, to love, to worship, and to serve.
Instead of containing a secret or secrets to being a blessed church, "The Blessed Church" is a book filled with popular catch phrases and weak or questionable theology that is common among the new establishment leaders of today's church.
But with all that said, I must say the final chapter of the book is excellent. If Morris would have written only the last chapter, he would have had a more solid message to share. No secrets, but something far more accurate and worthwhile than all of the previous chapters of this book combined.
But in my own opinion, "The Blessed Church" isn't worth picking up for just one good chapter.
I received this book free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group as part of their book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Review 10 for The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

great help for pastors to cast a vision

Date:September 18, 2012
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bookwomanjoan
Location:Oak Harbor, WA
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
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4 out of 5
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Meets Expectations: 
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If you are called to be a shepherd, Morris is passionate about your being as good as you can be. “It's why I've written this book,” he writes. (63)
He sets out to address the principles upon which healthy churches are built. He writes, not only about the how-to, but the why as well. He knows about church growth. The church he founded in 2000 now has some 24,000 active members.
Here are a few of the keys to a blessed church:
“When faced with a major decision or challenge, don't make a move without first getting alone with God and obtaining His counsel.” (11)
“Growth without real health is unsustainable. If you want growth, pursue and monitor health.” (31)
“What spiritual injustice bothers you the most? Righting that wrong is a key to your vision for ministry.” (37)
“The true shepherd models where he wants the sheep to go. He leads by example.” (71)
“Here's a surefire way to spot a true shepherd: he is an equipper. He is able and eager to equip people to do the work of ministry.” (77)
Morris really emphasized the equipping of the saints for ministry, calling it the biblical model. (87) “Every believer is called to minister.” (90) Small groups are the training and practice ground for equipping for ministry.
He looks to Jethro's advice to Moses for the balanced pastor's role: pray, teach the Word, and raise up leaders. (He has an extended section on empowering leaders.)
Morris uses lots of his own experiences to help pastors understand how to discern their own vision, how to write it, etc. He is very honest about his ow life and the mistakes he has made. And, he is the first to admit his church is far from perfect. “We don't have all the answers.” (181)
If you are a pastor and are looking for a book to help you through your own process of casting a vision for ministry and church, this book is a good choice.
Food for thought: Morris on worship, “Excellence is lifeless if God doesn't show up.” (191)
I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher for the purpose of this review.
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Review 11 for The Blessed Church: The Simple Secret to Growing the Church You Love
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great book to give to church leaders!

Date:September 8, 2012
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Anonymous
Location:Borger, TX
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
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5 out of 5
If you've read my book reviews before, you know that I like a lot of books. But there are few books that I love so much that I'm willing to purchase them for people I hope will read them. This is one of those books. For anyone on the staff of a church, I highly recommend this book. Robert Morris brilliantly shares the things he's learned from growing a church from the ground up. His humble attitude is refreshing and creates a desire to learn from him.
Robert has an effortless style of writing which will allow you to get through this book quickly and easily. In this book, you will learn about how to gain vision for your church, how to lead and shepherd your church, how to choose leaders, how to follow your pastor, and all about church governance. I don't think this book is strictly for church leaders (pastor, staff, elders, etc.). I also think church members would gain a lot by understanding what a pastor does (his decisions, boundaries, etc.)--even what to look for when your church is looking for a pastor. It would also assist a church in trouble to understand how a church could/should be governed.
At one point in the book, Robert tells how many churches today are falling into a ditch on either side of church governance. There are churches who have given complete authority to a pastor and many of those pastors are failing either morally or in their shepherding because there's no accountability. And then there are churches who are failing because lay leaders have so much control that it's choking the vision of the pastor. I think this book and Robert's church give an example of how to have a balanced church. We can certainly learn from the things he's learned.
I'd give this book 5 out of 5 stars!
Thank you to WaterBrook Press for providing this book for review. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255
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