Christianbook.com Ratings and Reviews

Customer Reviews for HarperOne Still: Notes on a Mid-Faith Crisis

This product is no longer available. Continue shopping at Christianbook.com.

HarperOne Still: Notes on a Mid-Faith Crisis

In her writing debut Girl Meets God, Lauren Winner shared her experience of growing up in the Orthodox Jewish faith and falling in love with the God of the New Testament, Jesus. Still: Notes of a Mid-faith Crisis reflects Winner's struggle and triumphs with faith, after the honeymoon of conversion has faded. She questions where God is in the midst of daily life, even as she mourns the end of her five-year marriage. Yet, despite her doubts, Winner still finds the Christian story best explains her story, and she continues seeking, questioning but hopeful.
Average Customer Rating:
3 out of 5
3
 out of 
5
(2 Reviews) 2
Open Ratings Snapshot
Rating Snapshot (2 reviews)
5 stars
1
4 stars
0
3 stars
0
2 stars
0
1 star
1
1 out of 250%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for Still: Notes on a Mid-Faith Crisis
Review 1 for Still: Notes on a Mid-Faith Crisis
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Winner, I've got one word for you : WOW!!

Date:December 7, 2012
Customer Avatar
JesuSaves
Location:Canada
Age:Under 18
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I wrote this review a couple of minutes after finishing this book.
This is food for thoughts. Excellent food.
Lately, I've been taking an interest into theology and I was really intrigued by this book the first time I saw it.
I took my time to read it and what can I say now? I. loved. reading. Still!
Winner has a different perspective than mine on some subjects but on the other hand, there were MANY things she said that made really reflect and that truly hit me deeply. Still is the kind of work that deserves a re-read just so a reader like me can fully grasp the heart of the message.
Lauren is very transparent, very intellectual (and very funny at times!). This journey was really fascinating as it exposed some truths that I would not have remarked before reading this. (Heavens, she really researched before writing. WOW!)
Also, the author definitely is a wordsmith. She's one of the best I've read. (You might need a dictionary (a lot!) while reading)
I would recommend this book both to those who are going through a mid-faith crisis or not. I don’t know how to fully explain how much I enjoyed it.
Excellent. Simply Excellent.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 2 for Still: Notes on a Mid-Faith Crisis
Overall Rating: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5

"I feel, therefore I am" religion

Date:September 4, 2012
Customer Avatar
Skotiad
Gender:male
Quality: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
Value: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
The author does not, thankfully, write like a seminary professor. Unfortunately, she still doesn’t write clearly, and she doesn’t write much like a Christian—not a mature one, anyway. I know it is the nature of “inspirational” books like these for the author to reveal her inner life, but as I reached the midpoint of the book, I couldn’t help thinking: This woman is deep deep DEEP into herself--and loving every minute of it. I know we all go through introspective times, but for most of us the cure is, turn outward—God, neighbor, etc. At the risk of sounding like a simplifier, I would tell the author that she might find God more “legible” (her word) if she stared into the mirror less often. I don’t know the full story of her failed marriage, but I’m guessing her delight in stewing in her own emotions probably wasn’t a plus. (Husbands can get very peeved with a wife who seems to be constantly writing her autobiography.)
Shortly before reading this, I re-read a biography of Martin Luther, who spent his life post-1517 surrounded by a hectic household--wife, children, admirers, theology students, friends, etc. Our modern take on that would be, “Poor man—had almost no time for himself!” I don’t think Luther would see it that way. His situation ensured he couldn’t get TOO self-absorbed, and the world can be thankful he didn’t. (If you’re familiar with Luther’s chronic “hygiene problem,” you’ll probably agree with me that a painfully detailed Luther autobiography would not have been a good thing.)
I can’t fail to mention that the writing is, frankly, sloppy. Granted, in a book like this we expect a few literary rules to be broken. But here the sloppy writing works in tandem with sloppy thinking to produce—well, slop.
One closing thought: recall the old George Bernard Shaw quote: Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach. I find it ironic that the author teaches “spirituality” (and, for all I know, might be good at her job), yet she presents her own inner life as a shambles. Physician, heal thyself.
0points
1of 2voted this as helpful.