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Customer Reviews for Lewis & Roth The New Testament Deacon

Lewis & Roth The New Testament Deacon

A keen interest in the diaconate is sweeping through today's church. Who are the deacons, what do they do, and why are they important? Claiming that the modern church has a distorted understanding of the New Testament deacon, Strauch examines relevant Scripture to help you better understand God's design for this vital ministry. 192 pages, softcover from Lewis & Roth.
Average Customer Rating:
3.667 out of 5
3.7
 out of 
5
(3 Reviews) 3
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Customer Reviews for The New Testament Deacon
Review 1 for The New Testament Deacon
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:October 27, 2009
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Lavonnie Erskine
I used the New Testament deacon book for all my Deacon training and I find it to be a wondeful tool to help new and regular deacons with their new walk. I have tried a number of different book but none as explict as New Testament. Thank you.
+1point
1of 1voted this as helpful.
Review 2 for The New Testament Deacon
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

Date:March 2, 2009
There is a lot of good Biblical information here on the ministry of Deacons, but the author's case is not clearly stated. As I understand it, he is attempting to define this ministry role not as a position of leadership, but a position of service and mercy. This book would serve as a good reference work on the Biblical basis of the Deacon, but I would not recommend it as something to offer to a newly-ordained Deacon. There are other titles on the market that are much more streamlined and easy to follow than this one.
-3points
0of 3voted this as helpful.
Review 3 for The New Testament Deacon
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:February 11, 2004
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Rev. J. Puskar
A very helpful resource!This addresses what a deacon is, biblically, not traditionally.Modern churches have morphed the deacon into either a "board member," or simply a "yes man" to the pastor.This helps discover what the scriptures really say.My only beef is that I disagree with his assessment of the "deaconess." I feel that such a role does exist, biblically. Also, we see the deaconess very early in the history of the church. Women serving women, officially. A good thing to have.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.