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Customer Reviews for Inter-Varsity Press A User's Guide to Bible Translations: Making the Most of Different Versions

Inter-Varsity Press A User's Guide to Bible Translations: Making the Most of Different Versions

A User's Guide to Bible Translations escorts you through the history of Bible versions in English from Wycliffe and Tyndale to the English Standard Version and Today's New International Version, with explanatory glances at the original Hebrew and Greek manuscripts, and translation theories along the way. In straightforward language, David Dewey explains how we ended up with so many versions of the Bible, shedding light on the difference between word-for-word and meaning-for-meaning translations, the controversy over gender accuracy, and issues of theological bias.

Dewey also reminds us that it's not enough to ask, "Which Bible is best?" We also must question what purpose the translation will serve, whether for personal study or for reading aloud, as well as what audience the translation will best communicate to, whether for inquirers/seekers or for those who may struggle with the English language. Filled with charts comparing versions and diagrams showing translation difficulties, A User's Guide provides an easy-to-use handbook for digging through the mountain of translation options until you find the right Bible for the right purpose.

Average Customer Rating:
4.444 out of 5
4.4
 out of 
5
(9 Reviews) 9
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3 out of 475%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for A User's Guide to Bible Translations: Making the Most of Different Versions
Review 1 for A User's Guide to Bible Translations: Making the Most of Different Versions
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Excellent book on the modern translations!

Date:October 19, 2011
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Papo
Location:Brooklyn, NY
Age:45-54
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
This is a book I bought for myself and for others. The chapters on modern translations and how they developed, espcially the pharaphased versions was extremely fascinating and informative. I think you need to know about various version, especially the differences between the Formal equivalence and the Dynamic equivalence. The book doesn't really recommend one version over the other but gives you a ton of information to make your own educated choice. Most people will have more then one translation of the Bible, but again the information in this book will help you understand what the purpose of the particular translation was meant to be. I think this is a kind of book you must have in your personal library because you will find yourself refering to it regularly. Its a great book! I highly recommend it!
+4points
4of 4voted this as helpful.
Review 2 for A User's Guide to Bible Translations: Making the Most of Different Versions
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Clears things up a bit

Date:September 6, 2011
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Brother JW
Location:AZ
Age:55-65
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Makes it easy to see and understand why we have so many
different translations. lets you see how a different translations may aid you in studying and understanding.
+3points
3of 3voted this as helpful.
Review 3 for A User's Guide to Bible Translations: Making the Most of Different Versions
Overall Rating: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5

Inadequate guidance

Date:May 4, 2011
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Marlowe
Quality: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
Ostensibly this book is a "guide" to the use of bible versions, but in fact it serves mainly to promote the "dynamic equivalence" versions, and leaves the reader with no clear idea of the disadvantages of using such versions.
-3points
0of 3voted this as helpful.
Review 4 for A User's Guide to Bible Translations: Making the Most of Different Versions
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

great companion

Date:April 7, 2011
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JohnEd
Location:N.E.Texas
Age:45-54
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I loaded this on my computer and little Mp-3 thingy. With each chapter as a separate track, finding and following the thought is easier. Since this is a 'modern vernacular interpolation' the thought comes across in an understandable way, although I would not call it a 'definitive translation' it is thought provoking and understandable, well worth a read or in this case a listen! Great Job!!!
+2points
2of 2voted this as helpful.
Review 5 for A User's Guide to Bible Translations: Making the Most of Different Versions
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 27, 2010
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Bruce Oyen
This is an excellent book. It is interestingly written and informative. Get it. Read it. Enjoy it.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 6 for A User's Guide to Bible Translations: Making the Most of Different Versions
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:May 6, 2010
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Alan A Lyon
Very well done. The style of writing and explanations were very clear and helpful. I'll be reading it again soon.
0points
0of 0voted this as helpful.
Review 7 for A User's Guide to Bible Translations: Making the Most of Different Versions
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:June 10, 2008
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Donald Batten
Whether you are looking for one of the excellent new English Bible translations or just want a better understanding of English Bible translations in general this book is for you. Its fair to all the versions wither formal equivalence {Literal} or Dynamic equivalence {more meaning driven to Paraphrase} philology behind the translations. The book gives you a brief history of each version some criticisms and high points.Easy and a fast reference you can grab to answer someones question about a particular English translation.Simply the best book I have read on this subject.I agree with the advice at the end of the book. To have at least three different bible visions. A literal translation for Worship and serious Bible study,for devotion and every day reading a meanings driven Bible.Favorite Bible translations for me are the new HCSB and NKJV for literal and TNIV and NTL for meaning driven and looking forward to the ISV.
+6points
6of 6voted this as helpful.
Review 8 for A User's Guide to Bible Translations: Making the Most of Different Versions
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:December 3, 2006
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David R. Bess
Dewey presents an excellent, balanced approach to understanding the history and nature of Bible translations. In a Christian community increasingly polarized by dynamic versus formal technique, the author gives fair treatment to each camp. He begins his work by describing the differences between dynamic and formal equivalence. He continues in part two by describing each of the modern English translations, giving more attention to the versions of the last century. He concludes by offering his own balanced insights on the present translations available, stopping short of recommending any one of them in particular.If you want a book advocating either a thought-for-thought or a word-for-word approach, this one isn't it. If you are looking for a balanced treatment of Bible translations however, then buy this book.
+5points
5of 5voted this as helpful.
Review 9 for A User's Guide to Bible Translations: Making the Most of Different Versions
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:April 28, 2005
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Christian Book Previews.com
David Deweys A Users Guide to Bible Translations is a comprehensive guide to the history of the Bible. Whatever your translation preference or reading level, you can find a Bible that will best suit your needs. Readers will encounter such words as neologism, biblish, functional equivalence, optimal equivalence, and tautological. However, Dewey is never highbrow, but explains his terminology and logically presents his arguments, often employing tables for the reader to see what he means. The gender inclusive language controversy has an entire chapter. The authors seeming initial bent toward gender inclusivity is refreshingly abandoned in the chapter discussion. In the end, all issues are laid objectively at the readers feet. This history of the Bible is enjoyable even for those committed to their current version. Deficits and merits of each translation are provided as well as the translation history, is it based on the Greek and Hebrew or Latin Vulgate? A basic description of each Bibles features is also included. I highly recommend this volume for laymen who may be in retail dealing with recommending Bibles to consumers, and to scholars for who this subject holds interest. It is an excellent read, well worth the effort. -- Suzanne Rae Deshchidn, Christian Book Previews.com
+2points
2of 2voted this as helpful.