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Customer Reviews for Inter-Varsity Press Social Justice Handbook: Small Steps for a Better World

Inter-Varsity Press Social Justice Handbook: Small Steps for a Better World

Every day we are confronted by challenging societal problems, from poverty and institutional racism to AIDS and homelessness. It can all seem so overwhelming. But while none of us can do everything, all of us can do something. This handbook will help you discover what you can do. Mae Elise anon provides a comprehensive resource for Christians committed to social justice. She presents biblical rationale for justice and explains a variety of Christian approaches to doing justice. Tracing the history of Christians in soil engagement, she lifts out role models and examples from the Great Awakenings to the civil rights movement. A wide-ranging catalog of topics gives background information about justice issues at home.
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Customer Reviews for Social Justice Handbook: Small Steps for a Better World
Review 1 for Social Justice Handbook: Small Steps for a Better World
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Great Book!

Date:May 20, 2011
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The Reformed Reader
Location:Louisville
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Summary
Mae Elise Cannon’s Social Justice Handbook is a book written to encourage and equip believers for taking part in social justice. The book is broken down into two parts: Foundations of Justice and Social Justice Issues. In part one of the book Cannon makes a theology of social Justice. Part two of the book applies this theology to particular injustices going on throughout the world. Cannon roots her argument for justice in the fact that God is just/good therefore we should be likewise. Cannon does not explain justice in light of, God restoring all things under Christ’s headship, but as an implication of the fact that this is an attribute of God’s character. Cannon’s argument is God is just, therefore we should be just also.
Reflections
I wish that Cannon’s theological argument for justice was better explained in light of the cross. There isn’t a section in the book that explains the difference between the difference between Jews doing good works and Christians doing good works. Why is it that a Christian who is taking part in justice different from a Jew or a Mormon doing these same works? I think this issue is extremely important especially in light of the many moralists attending our churches. The modern western church is full of “Veggie-Tale Spirituality”( being a good person divorced from the cross). Scripture roots good works in the resurrected Christ and his Spirit, working through the life of the believer (e.g. Galatians 5:22-3, Eph 4, and Col 3). Although Cannon does not teach a Social Gospel some may find this to be an implication while reading her book. Good works are not the “root of the believer, but the fruit” as Piper explained at the previous T4G conference. I do think Cannon’s book is an amazing tool for pastors and that it should be found upon their shelves. The church, not just individuals should be involved in justice. By taking part in social justice, the church demonstrates that God has defeated sin and is restoring all things back under the headship of Christ. Social justice is a reflection of this restoration that is taking place through the Spirit. Cannon’s book offers some helpful tools in educating believers of the problems within the world. Cannon also gives helpful/practical advice how to get involved in bringing justice to the world. Whether that be through watching a movie (e.g. Amazing Grace) or feeding homeless people within the inner-city, Cannon has ideas for education/relief for over 30 different injustices going on across the street, around the world. I would highly recommend the book, as long as one keeps the cross in their foresight. I do not think that Cannon neglects the cross in her book, but I do not she makes this the theme or reason for good works.
~The Reformed Reader~
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Review 2 for Social Justice Handbook: Small Steps for a Better World
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

Date:July 28, 2010
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jncarlos
Noble sentiments. The problem arises about how exactly to "force" other people to accommodate your beliefs in either numbers or degree to affect changes. To say that oneself should follow Christ's example is one thing. To say that someone else should, whether they choose to or not, is another matter...
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