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Customer Reviews for Howard Books The Six-Liter Club: A Novel - eBook

Howard Books The Six-Liter Club: A Novel - eBook

Average Customer Rating:
4.333 out of 5
4.3
 out of 
5
(9 Reviews) 9
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Rating Snapshot (9 reviews)
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2 out of 2100%customers would recommend this product to a friend.
Customer Reviews for The Six-Liter Club: A Novel - eBook
Review 1 for The Six-Liter Club: A Novel - eBook
This review is fromThe Six-Liter Club.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great read with a little humor

Date:May 24, 2012
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Joan K. Landis
Location:Perkiomenville, PA
Age:Over 65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I could not put this book down, it was so well written. I loved the characters and the healing from past terrors. I felt it was a great redemption story.
0points
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Review 2 for The Six-Liter Club: A Novel - eBook
This review is fromThe Six-Liter Club.
Overall Rating: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5

not a very "Christian" novel

Date:July 29, 2011
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bookwomanjoan
Location:Oak Harbor, WA
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
Value: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
There are so many problems with this novel I don't know where to start.
First, the author is a man and the main character is a woman, Camille. Both are M.D.s and perhaps Kraus thinks that's enough. But it is not. At one point a secondary female character says, “A man cannot possibly understand what I'm going through.” (89) Exactly. Kraus may think he understands women and how they act and what they think, but he has missed it by a mile.
As an example, this book is way too sexy to be a “Christian” book and to be seen from the woman's viewpoint. The male's sex drive is much stronger than the woman's (I think) and Kraus must have projected his own desires onto Camille. At one point Camille touches sexual areas of herself, so to speak, in the shower. This scene was not necessary and totally outside what I would call Christian fiction.
Camille is hesitant to have sex with her boyfriend, not because of morality but because of mental issues stemming from her childhood in Africa. Ultimately, Camille does not have sex with her boyfriend, not on moral reasons but because his “two timing” her is found out. Kraus missed a good opportunity to have Camille (at least) think about the moral nature of sex.
And Christianity in the book? The only Christian seen throughout the book is the wife of an alcoholic wife-beater who sticks with him. She is portrayed as having the faith that her son, the patient of Camille's who lost six liters of blood, will live. But again, Kraus missed an opportunity to have her as a stronger Christian influence.
At the end of the book, the last three pages, Camille has a spiritual turn around. It is almost as if Kraus remembered this was supposed to be a Christian book and added those last three pages. Upon finishing the book I had the same sensation as when I hear a testimony where someone spends twenty minutes graphically telling of their sinful life and then ends with, “Oh yeah, then I got saved.” The end.
I'm in a reading group that read this book and to a person, we would not recommend it. You cannot pass it on to a nonbeliever because there is nothing about the gospel in it. You wouldn't want to give it to a fellow Christian.
There is nothing I can recommend about this book to the Christian reader.
+3points
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Review 3 for The Six-Liter Club: A Novel - eBook
This review is fromThe Six-Liter Club.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:September 23, 2010
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Mary Umstead
As usual with his books, I was spellbound. Also, he doctored in a practice I use, so that makes it more special.
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Review 4 for The Six-Liter Club: A Novel - eBook
This review is fromThe Six-Liter Club.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:June 30, 2010
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Mary
One of the biggest selling points to Six Liter Club is that as a male author, he nails the female brain. Kraus gets into Weller's brain so well that I could thump page after page and nod in agreement, recognition or acclimation. He developed her charactor into a memorable role. As past meets present-one accentuated by heavy responsibility-Weller manages to deal with emotional aspects in her life almost as well as her professional one. The reader will admire the professional and relate to the baggage. In the end, there is a spiritual relevelation that will blow the readers mind. You can take it at face value, or dive in to multiple layers of meaning-it's up to you. In fact, it's obvious Kraus has written Six Liter Club with that in mind. The reader can take this book to the beach and finish it proclaiming it was a light read, or they can contemplate deeper meanings around many corners. I believe Kraus has stepped into a new league through Six Liter and I look for him to provide competition with some of the best mainstream authors in the business.
0points
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Review 5 for The Six-Liter Club: A Novel - eBook
This review is fromThe Six-Liter Club.
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:June 20, 2010
Dr. Harry Kraus has written another great book! Not sure why Im surprised. Have loved each one! This is a story of the first Black-American woman ER trauma surgeon, Camille Weller, hired at the Medical College of Virginia in 1983. She had to prove herself in several waysthe first woman, let alone a black woman in an ER trauma setting, the home of male testosterone and egos; trying to be one of the guys to fit in; and having to toe the line of the upper male echelons rules of conduct, the latter of which she defied in her method of treating a female colleague.This isnt Dr. Krauss usual medical murder mysteries, but the intensity of Camilles panic attacks and how they rule her world threaten her job and romantic relationships as well. It wasnt as riveting as previous novels, yet there was plenty of interactive episodes in the ER trauma realm, violence, and well as personal issues to keep you interested. The personal female touch, written by a male author, was a great approach to a difficult emotional situation.Krauss use of flashbacks amidst the storyline was used succinctly to intrigue you, but doesnt give enough details to give away the plot. The interpersonal relationships were complex, given the situations taking placewhich had me concerned throughout most of the book. He ends with a well thought out and twisted ending! A great read!This was a book I borrowed from the library. Dr. Harry Kraus is one of my favorite authors in this genre, and his books keep me coming back for more. Ready for the next one!
0points
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Review 6 for The Six-Liter Club: A Novel - eBook
This review is fromThe Six-Liter Club.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:June 10, 2010
This was a fascinating story of an African American woman who comes to terms with her past while dealing with her present. Camille Weller's mother was African, and her father was a white American doctor that was helping in the Congo. The storyline jumps between Camille's memories in the Congo in 1964 to her present time in Richmond, VA in 1984.As the story unfolds, so do her memories and they become a huge part of the struggles she deals with, on top of being a woman surgeon in a man's profession. This makes for an interesting read. The profession is difficult enough, and she has to make some moral/ethical choices that put her job on the line. I really enjoyed Camille's character. She is an amazingly strong woman, who has learned to cope with what she was given. She isn't a saint, and makes many mistakes, but that gives her character believability and depth. This is a wonderful story about struggles and achievements, pain and healing, sadness and hope and most of all, forgiveness and love. There is a Christian message that runs throughout the book, but the mainstream fiction reader should have no problem with it. I found this book to be very realistic, and an great read. I'm looking forward to reading more books by Dr. Kraus. I enjoyed his style and he seemed to nail the female character perfectly.
0points
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Review 7 for The Six-Liter Club: A Novel - eBook
This review is fromThe Six-Liter Club.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:June 9, 2010
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Edna Tollison
In 1984, Dr. Camille Weller is the first black female trauma surgeon at the Medical College of Virginia. On her first day on the job, Camille quickly becomes a member of the elite Six-Liter Club; entrance is saving the life of a teen that had been shot who lost six liters of blood. However, Weller struggles with sexism and racism as she becomes a highly regarded surgeon. She bends rules, but whenever she hits a gender, race, or national origin glass wall, she breaks through by recalling her early childhood in the Congo where her white missionary father and local resident mother died. Raised by her Father's sister that live in America. Camille has nightmares, but she can't remember what they are, she is just really scared every time she hears the phrase "Everything will be alright"This is a medical thriller that focuses on the trials of a young doctor facing several types of prejudices, as well as the horror of being orphaned in the Congo. Camille makes the story line work as she seeks her roots while also making it as a surgeon. At the same time with a deep look inside the OR, beads from East Africa and accepting or disavowing her father's religion, Dr. Harry Kraus provides a strong Reagan Era tale.Dr. Camille Weller begins her first day as an attending surgeon saving a young man who loses six liters of blood: thus her initiation into the Six Liter Club. Expecting a rousing congrats, Dr. Weller soon realizes the stereotype of "woman doctor" still applies--and as a black woman doctor, so do prejudices. A bout of nightmares about her childhood send her on a slippery slope of discouragement and confusion as she deals with hospital politics and romance.Thanks to Rebeca Seitz from Glass Road Public Relations for sending me this copy for review.
0points
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Review 8 for The Six-Liter Club: A Novel - eBook
This review is fromThe Six-Liter Club.
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:June 9, 2010
Dr. Camille Weller is the first African American female attending in the trauma surgical department at the Medical College of Virginia (where Kraus earned his M.D.). On her first day, she joins the Six-Liter Club - a reference to an elite group of doctors who have saved a patient after the patient loses six-liters of blood. Exhilarated, she decides to do something about the antiquated "doctors" and "nurses" signs on the locker room doors and changes clothes with the "doctors." She'll also blow their prejudices about skin color out of the water. Yet Camille has far more to overcome than preconceived notions about her skin color or sex...she's having nightmares about her childhood in the Congo, a dark closet, whispered words, and strong arms holding her back.I enjoyed this book greatly. We see the life of Camille transform before us. She cannot move into the future without remembering her past and it is her past that is haunting her present. Camille is driven to be the best, and we see her become herself in a man's world. We see her let go of who they want her to be, and become the woman she has been called to be. I must say I fell in love with this character. There were a few parts that made me a little uncomfortable, but I think those parts were really added to define who she was and was struggling to be. Cameille begins to think outside the box when a patient, another doctor, comes to her with a lump in her breast. Together their world's collide in many ways. Love, honor, and friendship are qualities Cameille wants to share with those around her. Much happens in her life and as the panic attacks begin she begins to question where they are coming from. Through all the twists and turns, Cameille does find love, honor and friendship. In the end she also finds a Savior who has been waiting for her to answer.
0points
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Review 9 for The Six-Liter Club: A Novel - eBook
This review is fromThe Six-Liter Club.
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:April 14, 2010
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Amy Givler
This is Harry Kraus' best book yet. I couldn't put it down. He moves seamlessly from the main character's African childhood, with its mysteries, to her current life as a newly-minted black trauma surgeon, with its own struggles. Along the way he manages to say a lot about the search for meaning and identity that young adults go through. I highly recommend this book.
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