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Thomas Nelson I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage

I Am Hutterite is the fasinating, true story of a young woman's journey to reclaim her heritage. In 1969, Ann-Marie's parents left the Hutterite community in southern Manitoba with their seven children. Overnight Ann-Marie entered a world she didn't understand where mac & cheese, bicycles, rock-n-roll, and Walt Disney were commonplace. In order to fit in with her peers, she hid her true self and now, in this memorable tale, she retraces her steps back to the beginning to discover her true self.
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Customer Reviews for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Review 1 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:January 11, 2013
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Jane Davie
Location:Sioux City, IA
Age:Over 65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Having visited a Huterite colony near Billings MT, I was anxious to read this book and could not put it down. Well written, after readng it I donated it to my daughter's United Methodist church, since it is on the UMW reading list this year.
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Review 2 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Interesting

Date:April 23, 2012
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Cari
Gender:female
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
I am Hutterite by Mary-Ann Kirkby
I would probably rate this about 3 1/2 star. I would tell my friend the pros and cons, and sort of recommend it, but not always (which is why I put no). I did recommend it to my sister, but I don't think I can say I would flat out recommend it to any friend.
Ann-Marie lived in a Hutterite colony in Manitoba, Canada for the first 9 years of her life. Just before her 10th birthday, her family uproots and leaves the colony to go live in a farmhouse in the middle of nowhere. This book describes her transition to the 'English' world. It also looks into the beliefs of the Hutterites and how this affected her and her family growing up.
(I will admit I'm not the best at writing summaries.)
At first, I didn't really like the writing style, and though the story was interesting, it was slow slogging. Of course, when I'm reading something for homework, or for something like this, I want to be sure I wasn't missing anything. So that's just me. After a while of having it, and only reading it off and on, I made a bigger effort to get through it. Once I got farther into the story, it became even more interesting. It is neat seeing a different lifestyle like this, from the perspective of someone that grew up in it. The Hutterites remind me of the Amish.
Because of the spiritual perspective of the Hutterites, which impacted the author and her family, there's a different perspective on salvation. The Hutterites think that if you don't live on their colony, then you'll be going to hell. Well, after they leave, Ann-Marie's mother starts listening to evangelists on the radio and gets very fired up about people needing to be saved. Now while that is in one way good, the way Ann-Marie ends up thinking spiritually seems to be somewhat erroneous. It's as though they desire to serve God and accept Jesus, but then the author talks about the Hutterite faith as though it helped ground her a little, or that she found the answers she was looking for inside of herself. It's a little hard to explain, so hopefully this makes sense. I wouldn't say it is entirely biblical and this shows how colonies like that can mess up one's thinking.
It is somewhat of a disappointment that they basically take God's name in vain a few times, sometimes in their native language. In some contexts, they are actually talking to God (at least it seems like it) and so it can be a little hard to distinguish between the different times. I'll probably go through and block out some of it, but then sometimes I'm sure it'll be hard to figure out if I should block out certain ones. That is frustrating. Also, it does have a few awkward things in it - for example they call back pockets on men's pants 'ass pockets'. There are a couple other things which I would say are a little more objectionable, so this is definitely not a book for younger readers or for families. I would say even something like 16 and up.
Now, I will say that there were some extra-entertaining parts in it - before but especially after the family moves outside the colony. These are what I really enjoyed about the book. They are funny and keep you interested - from talking about their 'English' teacher that came to the colony wearing skinny high heels, to the baseball game between Ann-Marie and her siblings against the rest of the school.
Here is an excerpt from after she started attending 'English' school. She talks about how English kids were always paranoid about getting dirty.
"They acted as if their mothers didn't know how to use a washing machine. Even some of the boys had this unnatural obsession with being tidy. I remember one muddy afternoon when Marty Wilkes came screaming down the far end of the playground, pointing to a large gob of mud on his light-brown corduroy pants. "My mother's gonna kill me! My mother's gonna kill me!" he wailed.
I had never in my life heard such a pronouncement, and I rushed toward him, completely forgetting my inferior status as I faced him friend to friend. I had to know what he had done that would condemn him to death at the hand of his own mother. His mouth-watering lunches flashed before me as I recalled thick egg-salad sandwiches on soft, white bread and chocolate cake with at least an inch of icing. "What did you do?" I asked, my heart pounding.
"She's gonna kill me because I got my good pants dirty!" he howled, tears streaming down his face.
Mouth agape, I looked down at his spoiled pants and back up at him. By now Mrs. Erb had arrived, but I stood there as if I were nailed to the ground. I had no words for a young boy about to be killed by his own mother."
You can see the product page here: http://booksneeze.com/blogger/resources/9780849948107
I'm supposed to include a link where you can preview the book, but I'm sorry, BookSneeze. I really can't find the link that you sent me (or were supposed to send me). :/
I was provided with a complementary copy by BookSneeze® in exchange for an honest review.
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Review 3 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

A Great Read

Date:December 3, 2010
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Zealfire
Age:18-24
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
The book starts by telling the story of how her family began and her parents getting married prior to having her. Mixed in are the traditions of the Hutterites and an intimate look into their society.
Her parents moved their family off the Hutterite colony and were thrown into the modern world of the time. Thrown into a completely different culture Mary-Ann had to begin to redefine who she was and the way she had once lived.
I found it to be a very interesting read; having never heard of the Hutterites prior to obtaining a copy of the book. I enjoyed reading about the traditions and way of life in which the Hutterite community lived and being taken into their world. One of my favorite parts is that throughout the text is scattered with the Hutterite German words and the meanings of them. The only issue I had with the book is that I wish it would have talked a bit more about the transition fr
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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Review 4 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:September 3, 2010
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Aaron Cooper
I really liked this book, and while I was reading it was transported to that place and time. It really shows some good insight into the Hutterite communities back then. Only thing I didn't really like was it didn't finish well. The last chapter just seamed to be thrown together.
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Review 5 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:July 17, 2010
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Christy Lockstein
I Am Hutterite by Mary Ann Kirkby is a stunningly beautiful story of a woman's retracing her family's history to make sense of her life. The author spent the first ten years of her life living in a Hutterite community in Manitoba, Canada, like three generations of her family before her. The Hutterites are a religious group that live communal life with no personal property. With the motto: work makes life sweet, labor is a natural part of life for all ages. They wear plain and simple clothing, and the women have distinctive headgear of polka-dotted handkerchiefs. Their life sounds intriguing and idyllic. Children are schooled from the age of 2-1/2 through eighth grade, and life has a strict order. When someone turns seventeen they begin working in the community and will do so until they are forty-five and then retire (!). Women who have given birth have another woman from the community come into the home and take care of them for several weeks, then a young girl is chosen to be the child's caretaker while the mother cares for the home, her responsibilities on the farm, and her family. It all sounds like a beautiful way to live, but as Mary Ann learned, if the leader of the group is a dictator, it can make life miserable. After repeated clashes with their leader, her father decided to uproot his family of seven children from the only life they'd ever known and try life in the real world. She and her siblings were forced to adapt to living without neighbors within shouting distance and going from feast-like meals three times to a day to scrounging for the necessities and eating cast-off produce. Her difficulties fitting in with her classmates eventually caused her to turn her back completely on her heritage until having a child made her re-evaluate. Kirkby has a stellar voice, and the reader is completely pulled into her world until in the end it feels like a terrible loss to have to say good-bye to the characters.
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Review 6 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:July 13, 2010
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Johan
I Am Hutterite by Mary-Ann Kirkby published by Thomas Nelson Publishers is a true story of a woman tracing back her roots to life on a Hutterite Colony in Manitoba. There seems to be many misconceptions of who they are and what there values are; This book sheds some light on this mystery . This book gives you a glimpse into the colony as she chronicles her life, this book is not about getting the dirt on the Hutterites but about revealing an uncommon lifestyle of simplicity. I now have a greater appreciation for the life style they aim to lead with many principles that we could stand to learn from in common society.This book is less of a documentary and more of a well written story that takes you on a journey into the colony as if you were there. There is a lot of detail in the writing that lets you visualize life on the colony. The detail and the personal commentary will take you on an emotional journey that will have you laughing and crying. This book is a gift to those of us that have little understanding of the Hutterite people.I recommend reading this book simply because you learn about a whole different culture living just a short distance away and that the lives of those living there have the same joys and tragedies that we all share as the human race. I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255 Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.
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Review 7 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:July 9, 2010
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Emmylou
I received a copy of I Am Hutterite to review from the Thomas Nelson's website. I received the book with the understanding that I would post a review of it. This review is of my own reviews and Thomas Nelson did not persuade me to make a good review. I Am Hutterite by Mary-Ann Kirkby is the true story of Kirkby's own transition at age ten from life in a close-knit and isolated Hutterite colony in Canada to life in the outside "English" world. The first two-thirds of the book engage the reader in Hutterite life, familiarizing us with the daily chores, the unique traditions, and the bonds that form as a part of communal living. Just as we become comfortable and content with Kirkby in her Hutterite life, her parents decide to uproot the family as the result of an unresolved, harmful conflict with the head minister of the colony. We accompany Kirkby as she adjusts and discovers who she is apart from the expectations of the colony and those of the English world.I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. I had never heard of Hutterites before (and am still not really sure how to pronounce "hutterite"), but I found Kirkby's description of life in the colony fascinating and idyllic, seen through the eyes of youth. I felt the first third of the book was hampered by an odd third-person omniscient viewpoint (as Kirkby explained her family history by means of story). As I read this story I felt as though I was right there with her as she takes you through the Hutterite community. However, once Kirkby was born, the transition to first-person narration seemed natural and I was drawn into the story, experiencing her hardships and confusion. I recommend I Am Hutterite to anyone interested in Hutterites, coming-of-age stories, or intriguing memoirs. I give this book five stars.
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Review 8 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:July 3, 2010
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Ioana
I absolutely really loved this book. It is a reminiscense of a time past, of childhood and innocence. The author, Mary-Anne Kirkby, so beautifully tells the story of her family and it gives the reader a glimpse of her heritage.Born in a Hutterite culture, a culture with its good and bad, Mary-Anne, after thoroughly sets the background, captures the differences between the Hutterite culture and the English one. It's funny and serious and it gets to you. You feel as if you were there, you were on the scene where the real characters lived and loved and hurt.Although the book is written by a grown-up author, you might get the feeling you see the events presented through the eyes of child, a 8-9-10 year old girl. That gives the book that extra something and makes it really innocent.The only thing that is a bit upseting is that the book deals more with the lives of the people on the colony and not as much with the life of the author's family. That part is mostly in the last 4-5 chapters of the book.But the book is a good one, especilly a good read for those who love autobiografies and personal books.
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Review 9 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:July 1, 2010
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Tina Coveney
This was an unusual book and it was fascinating to read the history of the Hutterites - a religious community I had never heard of before. Mary-Ann speaks from the heart throughout the book and describes her innermost feelings from early childhood, including the thoughts and feelings of her parents during that time.Day-to-day life in the Hutterite community is described in great detail, from the clothing styles to the food eaten. I found it very interesting indeed. I was surprised too by some of the things which were allowed by the community leaders, such as alcohol consumption. I did find it difficult at times to keep up with all the different family members who are named and described. Generations of people are talked about, and it can become a bit confusing. A lot of the old language is used in the book too, but there is a glossary in the back so that you can find out what Mary-Ann is referring to.My heart went out to all the children mentioned in the book, including Mary-Ann herself. It is a sobering thought that the decisions we make as parents have far-reaching effects on our children.I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255.
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Review 10 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:June 21, 2010
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KC @ Average: More or Less
This book was an absolutely fascinating look into a world I had not previously known existed. After reading Ms. Kirkbys memoir I longed to experience the simple, secure life of shared work, raising of families, worship and fellowship. And while I admired little Ann-Maries parents decision to stand by their beliefs and leave the colony, I mourned with the whole family. The authors love for the colony is palpable and while the post-flight, English part of the story is compelling, it was not as vivid with the color and detail of the Hutterite world. I applaud the familys obvious success in the non-Hutterite world, but I cant help but wonder why no one ever returned. Even I miss it and I only read a book.
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Review 11 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:June 18, 2010
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Susie Bibb
Mary-Ann Dornn was born in one of the Hutterite colonies located in Canada. She takes us on her journey as she is pulled out of a community she loves by her parents seeking the freedom of the outside world. Mary-Ann, is torn from the love of her Aunts, Uncles, Grandma, and friends and brought into a completely foreign world. She desperately tries to fit in and has many setbacks. However, she eventually breaks through many barriers and finds her place.This was an amazing story. It was a bit hard for me to follow all of the relationships in the bookjust because there are so many people involved and the book moved from one relationship to next very quickly. I was most impressed and interested in Mary-Anns mother. She had a faith that grows throughout the book. Being a mom myself, I loved seeing her faith being passed on to her own children. The struggles the family faced were immense and the way God guided them through the storms was amazing and inspiring to read.Thank you to Thomas Nelson for proving me with a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for this review.
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Review 12 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:June 17, 2010
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Monique
This was an interesting book to read. Although I had heard about and visited Amish communities around northeast Ohio, and my mom lived near a Mennonite community, I had never heard the term Hutterite. Reading Mary-Ann Kirby's book, I was able to glean a little bit of information about this religious community through her eyes. The family members and friends in the book came alive through her descriptive words and funny stories. Although the way the Hutterite people interact with one another is very straight-forward and blunt, quite a few of the people had a great sense of humor, just a little more dry than what I would be used to.I appreciate that Mrs. Kirby tries to explain what it was like to live between two communities and how difficult it must have been for her parents to make the decisions they felt they needed to make in order to protect their families.The way Hutterites live is fascinating along the lines of it takes a village to raise a child, which is very different than the way I grew up. I think it takes a special kind of people to be able to write and tell the stories, both good and bad, about her culture, its differences, knowing in advance that it will anger some people and embarrass others. I think writing this was probably very cathartic and was certainly corageous and I say thanks for letting me get a glimpse of your life.I was a little confused about the relationships of the numerous people who were described in the book, only to discover after I had read the book, that there was a family tree listed in the back of the book. There was also a Hutterite language glossary at the end, which could have helped me as well, if I had known it was there.
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Review 13 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:June 10, 2010
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Caitlin
Hillary Clinton once said that it takes a village to raise a child successfully. For Mary-Ann Kirkby, an entire village was in on raising her. She was a Hutterite.The author carefully tells her story of living in a rarely heard of community. Some people think of it as an Amish commune. Everyone is assigned a task. Someone teaches the children, someone else supervises their afternoon nap. Women work in the kitchen making dinners in mass to take home to their families. Everyone waits in attention to pass the inspection of the supreme leader. It's a peaceful existence. It's one that Mary-Ann cherished until her family ran away. Past and present collide as Mary-Ann recalls to her son what it was like growing up Hutterite. She tells the story of how her stern Russian father met and married her mother, and how their love story ultimately led to their running away with their six children years later. It's a story of community and peace. A story of love and betrayal. And a story of one woman's attempt to reconcile the "backwards" way she was raised with the modern way she was raising her son. I liked the book. If I had more space in my car, I would have packed it up and brought it with me on my move. If you want a fresh perspective on what it means to live simply (and not Amish), you'll want to read this book.Disclaimer: I review books for Thomas Nelson. In return for my honest opinion, I get free books. I don't have to say nice things about their books. I don't get paid. I just write what I think.
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Review 14 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Date:May 29, 2010
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Dawn P.
This book is a biography / autobiography of the lives of Mary-Ann and her family. First, let me explain that Hutterites are a branch of the Anabaptists and they live in communities that share everything. Kirkby begins the book by depicting the lives of her parents and how they met and started a family. Then we see the tension build as her family experienced tremendous difficulties and conflict within the colony. Finally, when the decision to leave is made, we witness the financial, emotional, and social changes that challenged them for the coming years. The book was interesting and read more like a novel than an autobiography. I appreciated the detail that drew you in and made you feel empathetic for the characters. However, I didn't appreciate God's name being taken in vain several times throughout the book and some other inappropriate language that was included. In addition, the ending seemed abrupt and left the reader with questions. (Thomas Nelson provided me with a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for a fair critique.)
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Review 15 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:May 26, 2010
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Lydia Bayer
I found this book very interesting . Being raised Plain myself it's always infomative to read about other Plain Folks.
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Review 16 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:May 22, 2010
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OpenBookGirls.com
Through this book, we journey with Kirkby starting in her idyllic days as a Hutterite child in her familiar world, surrounded by friends, comfort and traditions. When Kirkby was nine years old, her family chose to leave the colony, traumatizing young Kirkby and forcing her on a quest to understand and to come to peace with her parents decision and her own identity outside the Hutterite world. Overall, I loved this book. It felt like coming home to me in 100 ways I can hardly describe adequately. As a former member of a congregation in the German Anabapstist movement, I found so many traditions and behaviors of the Hutterites to be the same as my background and this book helped me to appreciate my background more fully from a cultural point of view. Although I was told we were the only true Faith and completely based on a literal interpretation of the Bible, in reality, the very foundation of this community and my background is grounded in German, Anabaptist traditions and customs, based significantly in culture passed on from generation to generation. As subcultures of their own, both my background and the Hutterite communities have many beautiful aspects and elements to be commended. However, in trying to mix salvation and biblical Truth with these subcultures, I cant disagree more.In summary, this memoir was beautifully written, giving a special insight into the lives and minds of a unique and wonderful group of people. And - as with my own background, I pray each in these subcultures will never confusion Jesus Christ and the Truth of salvation for a way of life no matter how warm, comfortable and familiar that way may be.by Anne @ www.openbookgirls.comI received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions are my own.
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Review 17 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Date:May 20, 2010
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Wendy
Im drawn to memoirs, so a book exploring the Hutterite colony in Canada, with promise to describe a familys experience after fleeing their close knit community, piqued my interest immediately. I have to admit Kirkbys, I Am Hutterite turned out to be different than what Id expected.For the majority of the book Kirkby introduces many, many members of the Hutterite community, details traditions, and provides a somewhat colorless history of how the colony became established in Canada. I fought to maintain interest.In the write up about the book, Id read Kirkbys family left the Hutterite colony when she was only ten. Upon reading that, I understood the book would address the time when political tensions caused her family to uproot. I kept waiting to get to the part about how Kirkbys family had to assimilate into an English/modern culture. And waiting. It wasnt until over halfway through the book that Kirkby writes about the move.I empathized with Kirkby having to wear prairie dresses during field day while attending English schools. I remember the last hundred pages the mosthow her teacher had to convince her father it was okay for her to perform a square dance and how shed collect saran wrap from trash cans because her family couldnt afford it, just to fit in with the other children. I craved to learn even more about what the transition must have been like, but had to plow through a lot of history to get what didnt quite feel like enough.If you thoroughly enjoy history and detailed descriptions of unique cultures, Id recommend this book. If you are looking for a fast-paced page turner, Id skip it.*I received this book in exchange for my honest review as a part of Booksneeze.
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Review 18 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:May 20, 2010
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bothof57
I Am Hutterite is a fascinating, funny, poignant look at life in a Hutterite community. Mary Ann Kirbys memoir helps us understand what it is like to live in a cloistered community, a community where men and women know their place and all work toward the common good. But even in this secluded life politics and pride creep in causing her family to "weglaufen" (run away) and head out into a world that is as ill-prepared to receive them as they are to fit in. Kirby does a good job helping us see this challenge through the eyes of a young girl struggling to adjust to this strange life she now finds herself living. The faith that has been deeply ingrained in her heart and life helps her through the transition from her Hutterite life to becoming English. And every year, by the grace of God, we inched forward. The beginning of the book is a little slow, recounting the life of her ancestors and providing background into the Hutterite world. Once Ann-Marie is born the story picks up momentum. The book, much like the Hutterite community, is filled with humor, sometimes self-deprecating and often hilarious. Kirby does a good job helping us feel the tension between the Hutterite community and the world at large. I Am Hutterite is a coming-of-age book in two worlds, the secluded world of the Hutterites and the wider world where being different can be a challenge. The story also reminds us that sin affects even the most set-apart societies and that the devil does his most powerful work by hurting relationships. I would recommend this book. I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I am under no compulsion to write a positive or negative review of this book. The opinions expressed are exclusively my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255
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Review 19 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:May 14, 2010
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kbo
I was completely spell-bound by this memoir of the Hutterite colony. Mary-Ann Kirkby grew up as a Hutterite, but at the age of 9 moved away from all she knew into the outside world. Mary-Ann starts with how her son came to ask her, "Mom, are you a Hutterite?" and then starts at the beginning of how her family came to the decision to leave all they knew behind to face the world and it's "sins."I didn't know anything about Hutterites, but grouped them with other groups such as the Amish and the Mennonites. They are definitely their own religious group. I had a hard time with trying to figure out where they drew their line of morality. Here they had to wear certain dress, but they drank freely. The Hutterite faith started in the sixteenth century with Jacob Hutter and a small group of Anabaptists. This group of people modeled their faith after Acts 2 where it talks about sharing amongst others. I was blown away by the organization this group of people have. Mary-Ann starts her story with her mother and father's wedding day. Throughout the book she gives us a glimpse of each of their families past and how they came to marry. She then takes us on a journey of her life and how the difficulties of her parents were kept very shielded from their children. I can't even begin to fathom how the children felt because of the upheaval away from the colony. "After our family left Fairholme, I discovered very quickly that my culture didn't have any value in my new life. Overnight, it became a handicap, and I had to reinvent myself to be accepted." (p.227) She answers her sons question by stating that, yes, she is a Hutterite.
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Review 20 for I Am Hutterite: The Fascinating True Story of a Young Woman's Journey to Reclaim Her Heritage
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Date:May 14, 2010
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Lacy Dill
"I am Hutterite" is a vivid and enthralling memoir of Mary Ann Kirby's early life on a Hutterite colony. Hutterite colonies are somewhat reclusive, devoutly religious and nearly 100% self sustainable. Mary Ann tells the story of her years on the Hutterite colony- how the colony worked, school was run and the gossipy politics of everything else in between. She is able to draw you in right from the first page.As a person who has never heard of a "Hutterite colony" I was completely fascinated with all the daily working of Hutterite life and what it entailed. Through Mary Ann's words you are able to feel the whole spectrum of emotions- from the love she felt to the anguish she experienced; you name it and it was expressed through the clear and colorful words on each page. Hutterite lifestyle sounds tough, fulfilling and yet distinctly detached from modern day "English" households, and this book made me want to experience it first hand. Mary Ann wrote this book after talking to her son about her upbringing and as a result you can just feel the emotions that each story brought to the surface. "I am Hutterite" is a very easy read and completely 100% compelling, once I started the book I could not put it down. I recommend this book to anyone and everyone--I promise you will not be disappointed with what you read.!!Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publishers as part of their BookSneeze.com book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commissions 16 CFR, Part 255 : Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.
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