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Customer Reviews for Thomas Nelson Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years

Thomas Nelson Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years

In Tough Guys and Drama Queens, Mark Gregston, founder of Heartlight Ministries, a residential counseling center for struggling adolescents, helps parents become the parents their children need them to be. The ability of a parent to reach their teen has more to do with approach than words. The book is divided into three sections: 1) What's Different About the Culture Today; 2) Why traditional parenting no longer works; and 3) A new model for parenting teens. So, if you want assistance with guiding your child through raging hormones colliding against a worldly culture, Mark's advice will help you engage your teenager and influence him or her for good.
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Customer Reviews for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Review 1 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Good Read For Parents and Ministers

Date:February 5, 2013
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YMinister1204
Location:Athens, AL
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Tough Guys and Drama Queens by Mark Gregston
This is a good book concerning the survival of the parents of teenagers. The parents of teenagers are the most battle weary, mentally exhausted group that exists in our world today. Most teenagers do not realize the stress that they put onto their parents by the choices that they make and the words that they say. Many parents feel that they are simply "clinging" to their kids by their fingernails in hopes that something they say will finally stick and make an impact. Gregston does a good job of trying to ease the minds of parents that are either a) in the midst of raising a teenager, or b) will be raising a teenager in the near future. He attempts to give something in the way of a handbook for parents who will be dealing with hormones, changing body types, rebellion, frustration, disobedience, brokenness, fear, love, lust, and everything in between. I would recommend this book not only for parents, but also for youth ministers and even preaching ministers who are going to have to be a witness to the struggles of not only the teenager himself/herself, but of the parents as well. Ultimately, the entire family is going to need to recognize what is occurring and by using some of Mr. Gregston's suggestions, they may be able to survive better than they could have before.
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Review 2 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

Date:January 16, 2013
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Ellen
Location:Indiana
Age:45-54
Gender:female
As a mother of 3 teens, I found much of the advice in this book to be ineffective and even damaging! The author seems to take a permissive approach to parenting. I can tell you, this makes matters much worse. I agree with some of the common sense information (spending time with teens, etc) but the overall message lacked biblical backbone.
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Review 3 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Tough Guys and Drama Queens Book Review

Date:January 13, 2013
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msculit
Location:Dubai, UAE
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I never thought that raising a teenager is like riding a roller coaster. One minute, you're up and the next thing you know, you're emotions are all going down the drain. That's how it feels like dealing with my own daughter.
I thought I was prepared to enter the battle but I was totally wrong. This book gave me the insights on how to deal with my own teenager and to be able to come out of the battle victorious.
The author, Mark Gregstons, uses picturesque words to describe the ordeals of dealing with a teenager and his tips on how to tackle unwarranted behavior, dangerous activities and malicious curiosity of today's teens.
The book presents viable tips to parents to reinforce positive relationships with their own teens and how to cope with their volitive behavior. Not only that the book is full of advise, tips and wisdom coming from a man who dealt with every face of teen angst and rebellion, and explains everything through his eyes as a founder and councilor of Heartlight, a center for teens with issues.
I highly recommend this book to parents who have teens or even those who have none as a means to better understand today's youth, what ticks them, what works and how to enforce a loving approach to a troubled teen.
The book was given to me by Thomas Nelson Publication via Booksneeze.com.
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Review 4 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Practical Wisdom with a Balanced Approach

Date:December 27, 2012
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Wanda Costinak
Location:Ontario
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by your Child's Teen Years came at the perfect time for our family: the oldest just turned 13 and the youngest just turned 11. Gregston gives insight into raising teens that I have never considered and probably never would have. Having worked with the extremes of teen issues and behaviour, he is able to provide advice and godly wisdom that is invaluable.
If I find interesting information when I review a book that I want to refer back to, I will turn up the bottom corner of the page. This book has more turned-up pages than any other I have reviewed! Part One: What's So Different About Today's Culture was frightening and provided motivation for me to get on my knees for my children! Part Two: Parenting Practices to Avoid was painful but helpful. There was one chapter in particular that had me saying "ouch" on more than one occasion. Part Three: Parenting Practices that Really Work was a breath of fresh air and filled me with hope that my children and I will survive and thrive through their teen years! I am very thankful for Appendix A: Conversation Starters and will be referring to Appendix B: How to Discuss Conflict before I ever open my mouth in a confrontational situation.
I give this book 5 stars out of 5.
I received this book free from BookSneeze. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.
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Review 5 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Parents of preteens and teens

Date:February 8, 2013
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Leung
Age:25-34
Gender:male
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
This book provides a functional interface between a teen and a professional therapist. I recently bought a copy to review and immediately purchased several for current clients. My adolescent clients identify with the examples and quickly catch on to "go to thoughts." Teens don't usually read straight through a book. They will tend to identify what matters most to them (in spite of what I may suggest as homework) and cut right to the salient features. It works well. Five thumbs (stars) up! Not too academic for them...thanks for your work.
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Review 6 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Worth your Time

Date:November 2, 2012
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mother of two
Location:Michigan
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Gregston gives parents of tweens and teens what we need: wisdom of experience backed by a Christian worldview. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and its suggestions. I have not raised teenagers yet, and some of his ideas, especially since they are ideas rather than scriptural principles, were hard to swallow. Still, he may be correct in his approaches and there is certainly much to be gained by considering his ideas. I loved how this book was organized and how he acknowledges that the world is changing and we might need to do the same in some areas.
I received this book for free from Book Sneeze in exchange for my honest review.
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Review 7 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Changed my parenting perspective

Date:November 1, 2012
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Heather King
Location:Gloucester, VA
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Even though my kids are all under eight years old, I was eager to read Mark Gregston's book, Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years. I figure it's never too early to prepare for teenagers and what I found in this parenting book did change my mind about some parenting strategies in order to raise responsible adults, who, more importantly than anything else, don't abandon their relationship with God or with mom and dad!
The beginning of the book focuses on the drastic changes in culture, mostly from media and social networking, that have occurred just within the past five years, Of course, this is an ever-evolving thing. Within the next few years, surely new cultural phenomena will shift the dynamic even more. The bottom line is that teens hold conversations like text messages--short, superficial interchanges. The air-brushed media pressures them to look a certain way. The easy access to FB and twitter give bullies a whole new realm to command---posting nasty pictures and sarcastic comments without bothering to pause and think first.
I'm not that old, and this isn't at all how I grew up.
So, Gregston argues, given how much culture has changed, shouldn't we begin to adjust some of our traditional parenting techniques? I would have said "no, absolutely not," without giving this book a read. I'm more of an "old school" kind of mom. But I began to appreciate the logic of his argument. If the kids themselves are different because the society is different, then surely the way we parent our children should be different, too.
This makes sense when you consider Gregston's background working with teens in a residential facility. The stories he tells repeatedly are about troubled teens who came from "good Christian homes." No Internet, no cell phones, church attendance requirements, no dating---lists and lists of rules and expectations. Lots of authority. But no relationship. Lots of consequences. Not much room for growing independence. Lots of high expectations. Not so much grace.
Let me be clear here, Gregston absolutely does not argue that we should throw out all rules or let teens run wild with no consequences at all. What he does suggest is narrowing those rules down to a manageable few and establishing consistent and reasonable consequences. Choose your battles, he says. He argues that we shouldn't try to eliminate the culture's influence on our kids, but instead help our teens learn how to navigate the world of FB and cell phones safely and wisely.
Ultimately, our goal of encouraging gradual independence doesn't mean we throw our hands up and leave our kids to their own devices. Instead, our goal is always to put our relationship with our kids first. We make home a safe place. We allow for mistakes and show grace. We choose to focus on what matters.
Will you agree with everything Gregston says? Maybe not. It's hard to find any parenting book that fits your particular child and parenting style, personality, and family situation perfectly. But what he says might just enlighten and encourage you. And, it might save your relationship with your teen. What could be better than that?
I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review and the opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Review 8 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Practical Parent Guide

Date:September 8, 2012
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1kyteacher
Age:25-34
Gender:female
For parents of tweens and teens, Mark Gregston's Tough Guys and Drama Queens is a must read. The tween and teen years are tough and dramatic and this book gives some great tips in navigating this time of life.
This book is divided into three parts. The first discusses the culture we live in today and how it affects our children. Our culture today often confuses adolescent boys and girls of their roles and leaves them with uncertainity. Also addressed in this book are parenting practices to avoid and practices that really work.
Tough Guys and Drama Queens is well written and full of practical wisdom.
I received a free copy of this book from Thomas Nelson for the purpose of review.
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Review 9 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Get this Book

Date:September 1, 2012
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tdae1234
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
This is a book for parents of teens, tweens, and kids... who will one day soon be tweens and teens. Mark addresses the cultural climate and parental responses to the world of teens. Mark shows how connection is more important than correction. It is appropriate for parents and youth workers who desire God's best for their teens.
I enjoyed this book. I'm always positively surprised by grace and Mark models it and explains it so well for the parenting world. Mark is rooted in Scripture and is so gracious to struggling parents. His practical insights and strategies are game changers. I highly recommend this book!
I received this book from booksneeze.com in exchange for an honest review
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Review 10 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

important perspectives on today's teens

Date:August 29, 2012
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Being surrounded by parents of tweens (although only currently facing the preschool years myself), I couldn't wait to read what Mark Gregston had to say on the topic of preparing for the teen years ahead. Given Gregston's status as founder of Heartlight Ministries, a Christian residential counseling center for troubled teens, it seems a given that he'll have insights and perspectives that only 38 years in the field can provide.
Sure enough, Gregston did not disappoint! Tough Guys and Drama Queens challenged many of my preconceived notions of where parents go wrong, and created a virtual road map to avoid those same pitfalls. Gregston also offered important perspectives on the issues today's teens face that we parents cannot fully understand from the outside. (E.g., think about how important it was to fit in in our day. Now look at the extreme measures today's kids go to to stand out. Understanding the pressures behind that drive gives insight into addressing its results.)
Initially, almost every page of Tough Guys and Drama Queens provided and "ah-ha" moment. Interestingly, however, I almost didn't feel as if I needed to finish the book. Once I clued in to Gregston's main points and position, his advice became somewhat predictable. But I won't protest that! A little predictability goes a long way in the world of parenting.
On a somewhat tangential note: being a mom who's closer to 40 than I am to 20, I found some of Gregston's insights into today's teens actually help me better understand the younger moms in my peer circle. Hmm. An unexpected bonus.
I received this book free from Thomas Nelson Publisher for the purpose of providing my honest review. I was not required to give a positive review.
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Review 11 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Good book for helicopter parents

Date:August 5, 2012
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
Are you a helicopter parent? Well if so, this book is for you! When I saw the title of this book, I thought this book would be just what I could use given the age of my children. And though it was not my favorite book that I have read, it did have nuggets of wisdom that I can apply. So many times when I read these kinds of books, I start with the attitude of “how can I apply this to my children”, instead of “how can I apply this to me”. Mark Gregston offers several strategies to help with child rearing in his new book, Tough Guys & Drama Queens. Perhaps maybe I am a bit too old school for some of them, but it does not hurt to listen to a different perspective.
You might think that you are in tune with your teenager, but this book does a good job of reminding some parents of the current issues facing our children today that we were not exposed to growing up; and the book probably opens up the eyes of other parents that might not have been aware of such issues. Tough Guys & Drama Queens, outlines three cultural attitudes facing our children today that are damaging their development: expression, appearance, and performance.
Take digital communication for an example. My, my, my, could you imagine being able to tee-off at a moment’s notice every time you got mad at someone in your teen years? The sarcastic little snips bantered around only to be forgotten a couple of months or years later. These small quips live on the internet and keep haunting both the deliverer and the recipient for a lifetime. Mark Gregston accurately points out that our kids are no longer concerned with fitting in to seek attention and acceptance, rather standing out.
We all have experienced the new “trophy society”. No one is a loser, everyone is a winner, blah, blah, blah…reality check uh-no! To counteract parents swing to the other side of the pendulum and put too much pressure on children to perform and place value in the performance instead of the person. This book reminds parents to allow children to experience “age-appropriate failure” so they are prepared for life apart from mom and dad.
The author’s opinions regarding boundaries, choices, and punishment is where we part ways. However, that is a matter of opinion and not necessarily right or wrong issues. The expectation for all of these books is that the solution will be tied up in a neat little package at the end. Once unwrapped, I am reminded once again that there is only one book that accomplishes that.
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Review 12 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

If You Ever Thought Not My Teen...Read This Book!

Date:July 23, 2012
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seekingmyLord
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I was really looking forward to reading Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years because I have a tween drama queen in the making and I was pleasantly surprised that the core of Mark Gregston's philosophy is not just how to handle the turbulent teen years but how parents can better prepare their teens for adulthood. Having worked with teens myself, I am impressed that Mark Gregston, founder of a Christian residental counseling center called Heartlight, has had thirty-eight years of experience with more than 2,500 teens.
The author explains the steps of the parental roles in memorable terms. In the first five years parents try to please their children. In the elementary years, there is a shift to protecting the children. Middle school aged children need parents to provide. The remaining teen years should be about preparing them for adulthood. Unfortunately, many parents get stuck in over-pleasing, over-protecting, and over-providing modes. The result is their teenagers are not prepared to be self-reliant adults and they take on the very traits the parents were hoping to avoid, but were inevitable with their parental approach.
At first, it grated with me that Mark Gregston feels that the parenting approach that worked well with me as a child would not work today with the overexposure to information, the overloading children due to our heightened technology, but then I have to admit that today's culture is significantly different than when I was a teen. There were no such things as cell phones, home computers, and cable TV in my home as I was growing up, much less the Internet, email, blogs, Facebook, Twitter, texting, digital pictures, and video games. Between the pressures of school, activities, homework, chores, peer pressures, social media, and parental expectations to excel, a child could be starving for a loving, peaceful, and restful relationship with his parents, as the author suggests. I have felt strictly curtailing online and gaming activities would alleviate these pressures, but I agreed with the advice in the book that at some point teens need to be encouraged to make their own decisions, so they can learn from their mistakes--and, yes, they will make mistakes--at home with forgiving parents.
I highly recommend this book for parents whether or not you are struggling with your tweens or teens. The book has suggestions on what parenting practices to avoid and what ones work. There are examples of previously ideal teens suddenly turning onto the wrong path and why other teens seem rebellious most of the time. Most importantly, I feel the wisdom contained helps the parent realize in a big picture way that the goal is not to have the "perfect teen," but to allow the teen to be imperfect. Not to buffer the teen from the world, but allow him to test the waters of self-reliance, self-control, and self-discipline by increasingly allowing him to make his own choices and realizing, as hard as it is to allow him to fail or get into trouble, that he will learn from his mistakes more than any lecture.
Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years will be staying on my shelf as a reference book to be reread in the future if only to remind me of the ultimate goal is to launch the teenager into adulthood and to encourage me stay on track with that big picture.
Disclaimer: I was given this book from Booksneeze in exchange for my honest opinion, no other compensation was given.
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Review 13 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A must read for parents of tweens and teens

Date:July 22, 2012
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CarliAlice
Location:Union, MO
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Mark Gregston knows kids. In this book Mark discusses how, with the extent of technology and social media, we need to change the way we communicate and parent our teen. We need to develop a relationship with him or her more than ever before. He guides us through the teenage years, how the teens are dealing with it, and provides practical guidance on how to handle the situations.
All I can say is, "Wow, Mr. Gregston! I wish you had written this 10 years earlier!". As I read this book I couldn't help but see how things would have been easier as my two older kids were teens if I would have changed my parenting style from the more "Do as I say" to a more relationship based parenting style. Luckily for me he said that it's not too late to start incorporating these techniques.
This book grabbed my attention from the get go when Mr. Gregston gave examples of your child might say blank. My kids said exactly some of the things he was mentioning, in the context given. It really helped me to understand that he had listened to teens over the years and truly understood what they are going through. He seemed to understand my kids without ever meeting them.
I enjoyed how the book was applied in sections although I really wanted to jump to the last section "A New Model for Parenting Teens" quickly. As I was reading through the other two sections I just kept thinking "Yes, so how do I fix this?".
I would highly recommend this book to parents, teachers, and anyone who interacts with teens on a regular basis. It will truly help you analyze your approach and determine the best approach for difficult tasks.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com book review bloggers program. No other compensation was received. All opinions are my own.
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Review 14 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Date:July 16, 2012
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DUCKgirl
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Mark Gregston
I don't have kids of my own but I would with teenaged kids through my church and my work. I love this age group. I am always looking for ways to better connect with kids and ways to help parents connect to kids. I really like the fact that Mark gives real ways to connect with kids.
There are two main take-aways from this book. The first is that we’re not bad parents, nor do we have bad kids; but sometimes we need to re-learn how to communicate.
And secondly, at each stage of their lives, we need to be training our kids to grow into the next phase. The day will come when our teenager is going to move on – as parents we want him or her to be ready for that challenge.
**Disclaimer: I was given an copy of this book from Booksneeze in exchange for my honest opinion, no other compensation was given.
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Review 15 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Dealing with your teenager

Date:July 9, 2012
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pastor2519
Location:West Point, UT
Age:55-65
Gender:male
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I’m a parent of a teenager; need I say more? As any parent of a teenager knows, there will be days when that son or daughter that you’ve loved since day one, will be a normal human being, a tough guy, a drama queen, a hot bed of hormones, loving, defiant, and anything else you can think of. Some days all those things happen at the same time.
For five years after college, I worked on a locked adolescent treatment unit. I figured after that experience I was ready to be a parent, and I even fooled myself into thinking that I knew all about parenting a teenager. Yeah, probably not.
Even though this book came a few years to late for me to do the pre-teen stuff, there’s a lot of practical information in Mark Gregston’s “Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How not to Get Blindsided by your Child’s Teen Years”, (Thomas Nelson, 2012). He starts with a session on how the culture has changed in the years since we lived our own teenage experience, moves to some things that we really should be trying to avoid, and writes several chapters on parenting techniques that work.
Reading through the book gave me a sore neck: I kept nodding my head in agreement. I wish it because Gregston was validating my parenting skills, but it was more along the lines of YES, that makes sense! Why haven’t I been doing that?
There are two main take-aways for me in this book. The first is that we’re not bad parents, nor do we have bad kids; but sometimes we need to re-learn how to communicate. And secondly, at each stage of their lives, we need to be training our kids to grow into the next phase. The day will come when that mercurial teenager is going to move on – as parents we want him or her to be ready for that challenge. Gregston offers lots of insight based on his years working with adolescents.
The subtitle is a little deceiving: it doesn’t let the reader know that a lot of the communication techniques that Gregston discusses can be used within the parameters of any relationship, not just parent teen.
BookSneeze provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for a review. I was not required to post a favorable review.
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Review 16 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great resource for parenting pre-teens/teens

Date:July 6, 2012
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Monica
Location:Iowa
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Tough Guys and Drama Queens by Mark Gregston offers today's parents a manual to go through the teenage and pre-teen years.This book is full of insights and advice on how to guide your child(ren)through their teenage years. The author, Mark Gregston, is the founder of Heartlight Ministries, a Christian residential counseling center, and has worked with teenagers for 38 years. Gregston has 2 adult children of his own and 3 grandchildren besides all of the young people that he has worked with through the years. He puts abundant experience and knowledge into this "how-to" book with techniques and wisdom to help you guide your children.
This book is divided into 3 sections. The first section talks about today's culture and the unique challenges that many of today's young people face. The second part talks about parenting practices to avoid. The third part talks about parenting practices that really work.
Additionally, 2 appendixes are included. The first one offers conversation starters. This section offers a long list of questions that you could use with a young person to get to know them better. For example, What's the most fun thing you've ever done? and What would be one thing I could do for you to make your life better? The second section offers detailed discussion starters for times of conflict. I found both of these to be helpful.
I personally didn't learn too much in the first section of the book that I didn't already know from watching my the young people around me and watching today's news. However, I did find the second and third parts to be quite helpful. I took notes through the 3rd section and found several things that I would refer back to and try as time goes on. If kids this age, came with a manual, I think Gregston's book would be one that I would use again and again. I requested this book as a hard copy so that I could mark it up and refer to it again. . .and I know that I will. I highly recommend it to all Christian parents of today's pre-teens and teens.
I received this book from Thomas Nelson's Booksneeze program. I was not required to write a positive review.
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Review 17 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Great book!

Date:August 13, 2012
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aleahhelton
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
I was recently given the book Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How not to get blindsided by your child's teen years. This book is written by Mark Gregston.
I have to say that raising to overly dramatic children made me very excited to get this book and read it. I am always ready and willing to see what others say about surviving the years coming up. I was not disappointed by this book.
The book is divided into three sections.
•What's So Different About Today's Culture?
•Parenting Practices To Avoid
•Parenting Practices That Really Work
Each section contains easy and practical tips for raising children through the teen years without losing your mind. It is all written with a very humorous outlook, including the introduction "What Duck Hunting Taught Me about Adolescence."
I found this book to be a great read, but most of the practices I already implement in my parenting. Things like not expecting perfection, setting clear boundaries and punishments, fostering independence, and stop controlling. I did however love the sections on gender differences and picking your battles. I also loved the extra's in this book on conversation starters, and how to discuss conflict.
This book would be great for anyone struggling with tough teenagers, or someone that is coming up on these years who doesn't know what might be coming up.
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Review 18 for Tough Guys and Drama Queens: How Not to Get Blindsided by Your Child's Teen Years
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

Tough Guys and Drama Queens

Date:June 16, 2012
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Leah
Location:Michigan
Age:18-24
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Tough Guys and Drama Queens by Mark Gregston is a well written book with some great advice. However, I must warn you I am not a parent of a teen I just work with them, but most of this stuff is what I have been wanting to bang into my own parents heads! Gregston talks about what is different with today's culture, why traditional parenting no longer works, and he gives a new model for parenting teens. It is so practical. The message of parenting can stay the same but it is a method that needs to change, sometimes we forget that there is a new generation coming into adulthood who have experienced a different world than you. This is what we need to remember and this book is the best tool to use to get there. If you are struggling with your teens or working with them this is a book for you.
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