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Customer Reviews for WaterBrook Press The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage

WaterBrook Press The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage

The story was in headlines across the world. In 2005, three Mexican fishermen were cast adrift 5,500 miles across the Pacific in their disabled boat. For nine months, they survived on raw fish, rainwater, and hope-filled passages from their Bible. Across the ocean, Hollywood producer Joe Kissack was drifting as well, but no headlines anounced his downward spiral into depression and substance abuse. From the outside Joe's life looked like an American success story complete with sports cars, a mini-mansion, and large salary. But on the inside addiction and anxiety were eating him alive. As he hit bottom he turned to the Bible and the God who'd been seeking him all along. In The Fourth Fisherman, discover how two stories from opposite shores intersect in a stunning saga of physical and spiritual salvation.
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Customer Reviews for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Review 1 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5

Forgettable

Date:June 9, 2013
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Jeanie
Location:Kearney, NE
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
1 out of 5
1 out of 5
Phew...How do I summarize this one? It's Kissack's story of depression and addiction, his recovery and later his pursuit (for the purpose of telling their story) of three Mexican fishermen who spent 9 months lost at sea. (There were two other fishermen who did not survive the ordeal.) Kissack had heard the men's story and at first had blown it off, then became intrigued by it, enough so that he went to Mexico impulsively and at great cost, financially and otherwise, to his family .
Do you guys remember this story of the fishermen happening? I don't, but Kissack does say that the arrest of JonBenet Ramsey's alleged killer (at the time) was the big story in the United States. (Apparently that was in August 2006.) Say it with me: Yuck! I wonder where that guy is now.
As an RN at a psychiatric hospital, I can tell you Kissack needs to be brought off his high horse regarding his attitude toward mental illness. I cringe to read "cuckoo's nest" and a reference to a straitjacket, among other insensitive comments. I've seen it and I know exactly what he's trying to do - distance himself from his peers. I have what shouldn't be news for Kissack: Mental illness can happen to anyone. He is no better than anyone else. I even tweeted him, I was so displeased. I have not gotten a response, but as I'm typing this he hasn't tweeted at all since May 31st.
I didn't expect Kissack to be Catholic when I started the book, but he joined the Church early on in the story (actually before things went so wrong for him)! I wondered, will he still be Catholic at the end? I didn't have to wait that long - By the next paragraph, he says going to Mass "almost" every weekend "was just checking another thing off the list." It doesn't seem like he got very into it though (especially not for the right reasons), as he didn't understand what a reference like "Rom. 12:1" meant later in the story. He says plainly that he was attracted to the Catholic Church because he liked a particular priest, and when the priest left the parish his interest waned. By about halfway through the book, it was crystal-clear that Kissack isn't Catholic. The church he attends - converted, for lack of a better word, from a grocery store - is called "Buckhead." If you need any more evidence, here's his description of the first service he attended there, not counting an event/"variety show" held there the night before: "...I slid into one of the rows - not pews - in the same room that the night before had been like a room at Caesars Palace. But now it was set up like a giant theater, and just as dark. The service began with another incredible band playing louder than the one the night before. It felt like a concert, and I think I even saw some smoke and strobe lights.... [A]n enormous movie screen dropped down at center stage, and a video sermon began (the pastor was streamed from another location).... I was sitting in a rock-and-roll, grocery store, video church - and I liked it." Three things: This makes me thankful we Catholics have the Eucharist. It makes me wish Kissack had been better catechized when he joined the church. And it makes me wonder about the orthodoxy of the priest that had so attracted Kissack to the Faith, especially after the description of the church he likes.
I do like Kissack's account of how he felt after converting in general (not to the Catholic Church), and it makes you wish you could (re)capture the feeling: "I felt joy in a way I never had before.... Before, when I'd heard others say what I was now saying, I would be dismissive and think of it as gooey spiritual talk. But this - this was real. It was like the rush you get after a hard workout or brisk morning run, yet this wasn't about endorphins, much less artificially manufactured substances. This was about a real, true spiritual release, the chemistry of God's grace that substituted His 'enoughness' for my relentless needs and drives."
My own favorite part of the book comes when Kissack is pursuing the three surviving fishermen in Mexico, because of a series of what my friend calls "God-incidences" (coincidences) that eventually lead him to the men (no easy task). It's another thing you wish would happen to you. In my case it hasn't in a long time! (Okay, that I know of.)
Kissack doesn't convincingly link his story to that of the fishermen. I still don't get the connection. This book is forgettable, and won't do anything for you. (Skip!)
"I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review."
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Review 2 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Good Story

Date:April 28, 2013
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Callie
Age:18-24
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
I wasn't quite sure what to expect when I started reading The Fourth Fisherman by Joe Kissack. I ordered because I think survival stories are interesting, but then when I read the description more closely it almost sounded like it was going to be an autobiography.
But when I started the book it sucked me right in. It turns out it was both - a survival story about three fisherman who were lost at sea and and autobiography of the author. It sounds odd when I say it like that, because it doesn't seem like the two stories would fit together, but they do. I liked how the author was able to tell both stories at once - it kept it interesting to me.
I think after reading this book, the best way to describe it would be to say that this book is a testimony. A story of how three men were lost at sea for nine months and God's faithfulness saw them through. And a story of how one man who found himself lost in life until God found Him.
I love reading testimonies of how people come to know Jesus and how God has worked in their lives, and this book was right up that alley on multiple fronts. I enjoyed it, and I would recommend it!
Note: I received this book for free through the Blogging For Books program in exchange for this review. This is my honest opinion.
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Review 3 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

on Fishing for Fishermen and Acceptance

Date:February 27, 2013
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theTRu
Age:35-44
Gender:male
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
I had no idea who Joe Kissack was, but I assumed he had some significance as a men's ministry leader of some sort. And at the mention of the phrase "stand in the gap," I was inclined to think it had something to do with Promise Keepers, but apparently not. Actually, none of this really matters, because, Joe is a motivational speaker who has a compelling story and that's what this book is all about.
Joe's story is a shared story and, as I'm sure he'd describe it, it's God's story. It's a story of redemption, deliverance, and recovery. Having spent the better part of his life striving for acceptance by successfully acquiring possessions, the cost eventually caught up with him. His shared story includes three fisherman who spent the better part of a year adrift in the Pacific, struggling to survive long enough to find their rescue. As I said, there is redemption, but it wasn't without hitting rock bottom. There is deliverance, but it's didn't come without persistence and hard lessons along the way. There is recovery, but it's been a slow and difficult process, filled with numerous setbacks and unforeseen challenges. It's Joe's story and it's the story of three poor fishermen, but ultimately it's the story of God working in lives and circumstance to bring about His glory.
- from TRudATmusic[dot]com[slash]raw (11/7/12)
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Review 4 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Very good read

Date:November 4, 2012
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GHayes
Location:Oregon
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
The Fourth Fisherman by Joe Kissack.
The Fourth Fisherman is a book that parallels Joe's life with that of five fisherman who are lost. The fisherman are lost and adrift in a boat at sea at the same time that Joe, who appeared to have it all: money, a life in the fast lane that money buys, was also lost and adrift--only Joe was lost on the sea of life. Three of the five fishermen miraculously survive despite being lost and adrift for nine months. They attribute their survival to their faith in God; faith one fisherman started out with, and the other two gained during their time of at sea. About the same time Joe, also very lost, is miraculously saved. As his life hits rock bottom he finds the only way up is through the grace of God. He finds his salvation comes by exercising the same faith, in the same God, as that of fishermen.
The Fourth Fisherman is a very interesting and well written book. I very much enjoyed reading it, finding my faith is strengthened and my priorities are re-set. I definitely recommend the reading of this book.
I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review.
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Review 5 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Good read, but a bit awkward

Date:October 26, 2012
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Blue Raindrop
Location:Wichita, Ks
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
The Fourth Fisherman by Joe Kissack is the latest book I’ve received from Waterbrook Multnoma for reviewing.
It tells the story of a group of hired fishermen who were on a boat that was damaged during a storm, and who found themselves drifting.... and drifting... and drifting.
Eventually the boat made it all of the way across the ocean, from Mexico over to near Australia... and three of the men survived.
The book also tells the story of the author, who worked in Hollywood, and was very successful but still found his life falling apart, and his journey of recovery.
Later, it ties the two stories together, and tells of how the author saw the story of the fishermen as a parallel to his life, and explains his quest to make contact with them and tell their story.
It’s a really interesting book, and the stories both draw you in and make you want to keep reading.
But it sort of gets awkward with the two stories mixed together... especially at the start of the book when they really seem to have nothing to do with each other, but the chapters flip back and forth.
I think that the two stories really would have done better told separately... completely tell one, then the other, and then relate them. The author does explain that he only intended to write about the men, but was told by many people that he needed to include his story too... but I don’t think this was the best way to do it. At some points, the flipping back and forth even sort of seems to trivialize the struggles that the author was facing... in comparison to being hopelessly adrift at sea while your crewmates die, just about anything else is going to seem trivial.
It’s still a good read... but keeping the big picture of where he’s trying to go with this in mind at the first part of the book might be helpful.
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Review 6 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

A common thread brings them together...

Date:October 11, 2012
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Blog4readers
Location:Michigan
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage by Joe Kissack
The story of the Three Mexican fisherman that made world-wide headlines was one of the threads in the cord of this story. Drifting in a fishing boat for over nine months across the Pacific, bearing up under unimaginable conditions with little to keep them. Their rations of food and water were scarce and they fought the elements as they turned their hearts toward those things that had been planted deep in them.
The second thread of the story involved the author, Joe Kissack. From all appearances he seemed to have captured the "good life." Yet through it all his life began to unravel, addictions, alienation and depression clouded his vision and caused him to look for a permanent way out.
The third thread of the story is a Bible...God's Word. Bringing hope and faith, these men found an anchor through life's storms.
I enjoyed the way that Joe interchanged the stories during the first part of the book, switching back and forth between chapters. The story of the fishermen held my attention fast, I had a hard time setting the book down. The second part of the story, though a great testimony, was not as captivating for me. I am thankful that Joe was able to find God in all that he went through, yet the story seemed to drag on for a while.
I give this book 3/5 stars***
This book was given to me from WaterBrook Multnomah in exchange for an unbiased review.
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Review 7 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

It felt like an intro to something bigger

Date:October 9, 2012
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jnjdet
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
I didn't know much about the story of the three fisherman who survived 9 months on the open ocean. What an amazing story of survival that is. Mr. Kissack weaves his story in along with the story of the fisherman and while I was wondering how they were intertwined it did become obvious in the last half. It's amazing how two stories can be so different yet have obvious parallels. While the fisherman were desperately clinging to their faith to survive, Mr. Kissack was trying to figure out how to survive his "successful" life without faith. It wasn't until complete brokenness he called out to God and was rescued. As he began pursuing the story of the fisherman it took a whole lot of faith in God to continue, especially when it didn't make sense to others. I was inspired by this story but I would love to hear more about the fisherman's side. This book felt more like an intro to the bigger story that's coming soon.
I received this book free from Waterbrook Multnomah in exchange for my review.
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Review 8 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

What a catch!

Date:September 27, 2012
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Rachel Reader
Location:Michigan
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
The Fourth Fisherman captured my attention from the beginning. Page after page the reader is captivated by the tale of fishermen lost at sea wondering if they will survive and how anyone can endure such a tragic experience. Because this tale is told along side the story of the author revealing his struggle with power, fame and substance abuse, the reader is able to see the connection between being lost at sea and lost in the sea of the temptations of this world. I found this book to be very thought-provoking and a page turner. It was inspiring and a reminder to all who read it that God is faithful and will prevail.
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Review 9 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A+ Must Read to Believe!

Date:September 12, 2012
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ddalebooks
Location:Texas
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
By Joe Kissack
Stranded in a small boat thousands of miles from home in the Pacific Ocean, how could 3 fishermen survive for months at sea with no supplies? Trapped in a high powered position with nowhere to go but down, how could a man survive the demands of having it all? Two radically different stories beautifully woven into one is the perfect description of The Fourth Fisherman. Three Mexican fishermen left the western shores of Mexico intent on spending three days filling their boat with fish and their pockets with enough money to survive. They could not have anticipated the tremendous storm that sent them off course, washed away their supplies, and left them adrift for nearly a year at sea. Joe Kissack was a TV syndication executive with everything he wanted, and nothing of substance. He tried to fill the void by spending money, drinking, and drugs. Joe never expected that there was a much simpler answer to fulfillment. Both the fishermen and Joe were surprised to find Jesus drawing them to Himself in the midst of hopelessness. And in turn, finding hope for real life.
This is a fantastic story of how Jesus can bring hope to the hopeless. I was intrigued by the description of the back of the book, and am glad to say the story is everything it promises. The fishermen’s story is detailed, graphic, and amazing. Over and over, I just had to read parts of their story to my husband, and tell him how much he needed to read this book when I finished! The story of Joe’s life, and the truth about “having it all,” has never been shared in a more poignant manner. The real cost of the high life was not money, but personal debilitating crisis and a ruined marriage. I am so glad a friend was there with a Bible and lots of prayer to lead Joe to Jesus. It is an encouragement to me to do the same for someone else. Overall I give this book and A+. I am not a non-fiction kind of person, and I couldn’t put it down! The book is a must read (and not on an empty stomach! Take some Pepto Bismol before you start!).
I received a free copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for my honest review.
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Review 10 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Good Book But Not the Best

Date:September 11, 2012
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Sherrey
Location:Portland, OR
Age:Over 65
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
2 out of 5
2 out of 5
(click to see the video)
User submitted video
WaterBrook Multnomah provided a copy of The Fourth Fisherman to me, and in return I agreed to give an honest review.
Based on that agreement, I must say that the title intrigued me and on that alone I selected this book. Although I enjoyed the book, I cannot say that it's one I'm excited by.
The author's own story is one of extraordinary life problems and an incredibly refreshing look at his conversion. However, the intersection between his story and the story of five Mexican fisherman lost at sea was clouded by indistinct details in that part of the book. Some clarity would have made the last half of the book much more readable and enjoyable.
Kissack's writing is good but at times weak. Repetitions and redundancy work to get a writer's point across, but the ones found here was not well juxtaposed and left the reader, at least this one, jumping back to see if I had just read that same point.
All in all, this is reflection on how we can get caught up in the trappings of life and lose sight of what our lives should be about. Then, God plants His call in our hearts and we struggle to understand our purpose.
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Review 11 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Interesting story about relying on God

Date:September 2, 2012
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Myheart623
Location:Janesville, WI
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
The Fourth Fisherman, the title alone was intriguing enough to grab this book from Waterbrook Press. It is actually two stories woven into one book which makes you never want to put the book down.
The story of Joe Kissack, a successful Hollywood executive on the road to the American dream, captures the heart because it is often the story of ourselves. Driven to make money and gain position and fame, Joe watches his life fall apart before him in a quiet downhill spiral. Struggling with depression, drugs and alcohol addiction, Joe finally hits a brick wall and realizes something must change in his life. And God enters to pick up the broken pieces of a drained life.
The second story is about five Mexican fishermen from who go out one morning like they had so many times before in their life. Through a chain of events and poor decisions, they end up drifting across the Pacific Ocean with no fuel to get home. The story of their adventure for nine months of battling dehydration, illness, starvation and hopelessness catches you and won’t let you go. As they read the one tattered Bible on the boat and trust in a faithful God, they see God provide on a daily basis. Their story was the subject of headlines across the world.
At first, it seems like the only connection to these two stories is that Joe gets the rights to publish their story. But on a closer look, their stories are really the adventure of a life given over to God. We are, once again, reminded that we are all lost and adrift if we don’t look to our Creator and Savior to put our broken lives together. This was an interesting story that anyone could benefit from.
I received this book free from Waterbrook Press. I was not required to give a positive review.
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Review 12 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Unforgettable true story about real people

Date:August 31, 2012
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LaTawnia Kintz
Location:Forest Grove, Oregon
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
I read The Fourth Fisherman a couple of times. Not because I had a hard time with the book, but because there was so much truth in it, that I didn't want to miss a single point.
This is an extremely well-written, honest story about Joe, how he was lost on the inside; and three fishermen who were lost on the outside. How does that make sense? The three fishermen had faith in God though they were lost at sea and Joe had a life most people would have been envious and he was lost without any faith.
I found the intertwining of what could have been two separate stories to be on spot. He is very open about his various addictions before he submitted his life to Jesus. He bares his life and heart to everyone and then shows them how he was changed by faith in Jesus. Throughout this revealing story about a successful man falling, he tells the story of the three Mexican fishermen who were lost and how they survived all those months at sea.
There is so much more I want to say about this book. However, I believe it would be best for you to read it for yourself. You won't be disappointed and you may find yourself reading it a time or two more.
It is an emotionally packed, true story about real people and real events.
This review was made possible through Blogging for Books and abovethetreeline.com by freely providing me with a review e-book. I am under no obligation to write a positive review.
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Review 13 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Exciting & Inspiring Story

Date:August 20, 2012
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ajms429
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
In The Fourth Fisherman, Joe Kissack tells two very different stories, that just happen to overlap. The first story is his own, a television executive who is living the American dream...yet is unsatisfied and turning to alcohol and a plethora of antidepressants to cope.
The second story is that of five Mexican fisherman who went out on what was meant to be a three day fishing trip, but ended up lasting over nine months after they ran out of fuel and were left to drift around in the Atlantic. Depleting their food and water supply within a week, these men turn to the faith of one fisherman and his most prized possession-his Bible- to cope. Still, only three will survive.
Both parties need rescue: One spiritual, the latter physical. And both end up turning to the same place to find it...Faith in God. We see how God works in the lives of Joe Kissack and these Mexican fisherman. Through their different circumstances, He brings them together into a special friendship, but also, into a deeper faith in Himself.
I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. The story alternates between chapters, one about Joe Kissack, the next about the fisherman. This keeps the it exciting...and keeps you turning the pages! Joe gives firsthand account of his story, as well as that of the fishermen. (To know how he found out about their experience-which was not covered heavily by US media- in the first place, you'll have to read!) This book will leave you inspired by their faith, as well as reminded of the awesome power of God, in even the darkest circumstances.
I do have two little issues, I guess. First, in describing his conversion, Joe makes no mention of Christ, the cross, the gospel, or repentance. All he says that God came into his life one night. The End... Now, I'm not doubting that he was saved, based on what he writes throughout the book. He describes definite changes in his life and a new desire for God's word, which are true fruits of salvation. And I understand that everyone's salvation experience is different. I just personally think he could have elaborated a little more on what exactly coming into a relationship with God means. Second, though it is explained in the very end (and not what you'd expect), I really don't understand where the title (The Fourth Fisherman) comes from... But, I'll let you read the book and see about this one, though.
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Review 14 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

A Great Read

Date:August 5, 2012
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Book Lover
Location:Texas
Age:45-54
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
By the world’s standards, Joe Kissack had it all. Money, sports cars and limousines, a mini mansion, and a successful career as a Hollywood executive. But the high-pressured lifestyle drove him into an addition to drugs and alcohol and he soon found himself at rock bottom.
And that is where he met Jesus…
During the summer of 2006, an unbelievable story hit the newswires—the rescue of three Mexican fishermen who had spent nine months drifting on the Pacific Ocean. Joe sets out to find these men and tell their story.
In the book The Fourth Fisherman, Joe writes about the journey of the fisherman lost at sea and interweaves his own story of being lost in the world. Faith and a tattered Bible gave the fishermen hope. A friend and a Bible was the lifeline that caused Joe to come to faith in Christ.
If you want to read a story that will strengthen your faith, I recommend The Fourth Fisherman. To read a sample chapter or learn more, click here.
(I received a free copy of this book from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review.)
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Review 15 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Date:July 27, 2012
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danielcooley
Location:Rio Rancho, NM
Age:45-54
Gender:male
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
The Good: I chose this book in order to read about the Mexican fishermen who lived after spending a zillion days in their little boat out in the open sea. To the extent that the book covered these men and their families I enjoyed the book. But – this book isn’t primarily about the three fishermen who live through their amazing ordeal of being stranded in the ocean.
It’s primarily about the author, Joe Kissack, who calls himself “The Fourth Fisherman.” And that brings us to…
The Bad: I didn’t care about Joe. He tries to weave his story of being rich, feeling lost, finding God, coming to faith and finding his real home with the fishermen getting lost, finding God, coming to faith, and coming home. It didn’t work for me.
I wanted more information about the fishermen – Did they really find God? What did that look like? What were their homes like before they left on that fateful fishing trip? How did they change as a result of being lost at sea and finding God? What about the families of those who died at sea? Instead of that information, the author gives us something else. I got concerned when the surviving three fishermen’s story was over, but the book was only about half way through.
The rest of the book was about The Fourth Fisherman. I didn’t care about Joe. He wasn’t poor, he was rich. He wasn’t lost at sea, he was lost in self-absorption. Guess I should have read the title.
The Ugly. The author talks about the three fishermen and himself finding God, but what does that mean? There is talk about how much the Bible helped the guys on the boat, so I assume they weren’t finding Buddah, but it wasn’t much more specific than that. You may like that, but for me it was too vague. And then it gets ugly.
Joe believes he is led by God to do some things that make little sense. The things he “feels led” to do are hard on his finances, his wife, his kids, his employer, etc. And it all ends… empty.
I hope Joe lives to see his movie produced (about the fishermen). I think it could be a good one if he does just one thing. I hope he leaves the fourth fisherman out of it.
I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review. They asked for honesty.
DanielCooley.com
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Review 16 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

An adventure of faith

Date:July 27, 2012
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Heather King
Location:Gloucester, VA
Age:25-34
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Five Mexican fishermen caught in a storm ended up adrift in the Pacific Ocean. Nine months later the three survivors were picked up by an Asian tuna fishing boat.
You'd think their story would be about survival and leadership.
A media big-shot with multiple houses, flashy cars, $1000 suits and $300 sunglasses ends up unemployed in a psych facility.
You'd think his story would be about self-reliance and rebuilding his personal success.
Neither assumption is true. Both of these stories are about faith. Three Mexican fishermen survived for 9 months on the ocean on turtles, fish, rain water, and a Bible. A man who achieved every worldly success finds himself addicted to prescription medications that never even take the edge off his anxiety and depression. But He discovers a faith in God that fills the void and redirects his life.
Not many people perhaps can relate completely to just how flashy the author's life was before the crash, but it makes his search even more drastic. Ultimately, I think many people will be able to relate to buying into the American Dream and the promises the world offers only to end up disillusioned and empty.
The stories begin separately, both compelling, and ultimately intertwine with the American entrepreneur meeting the fishermen in Mexico and asking to tell their story. Ultimately he finds that it's THEIR story, together, a story of finding faith, fighting for faith and surviving on faith.
The book moves quickly and is an interesting read, probably more so at the start than at the end. To some extent, it's an unfinished work as Joe Kissack still wants to see a movie made out of the fishermen's story, which has yet to happen. In the meantime, their story is being told through this book and it's a pretty amazing story to tell.
I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review and the opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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Review 17 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Interesting Tale

Date:July 26, 2012
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Reese
Location:Prattville, Alabama
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Let me begin by saying if you are squeamish, you may want to skip this book or be prepared to skip over parts of this book.
Joe Kissack's new book The Fourth Fisherman tells the true story of five Mexican fisherman who set out on a three day fishing expedition only to encounter problems which eventually lead to the death of two of the fisherman. Of being stranded in the Pacific Ocean for nearly nine months with no supplies such as food and water. How did these three men survive? What gave them the will to go on?
Simultaneously, Joe Kissack was facing his own ocean of problems. Although he was a fairly well off mover and shaker in the television industry, there was something missing in his life. His life was beginning to crumble and fall apart. The Fourth Fisherman combines the life and death story of the struggle of the Mexican fishermen with the life and spiritual struggles of Mr. Kissack.
I did enjoy reading this book and had a hard time putting it down. But without personally knowing Mr. Kissack I was somewhat uncomfortable wondering if he was using the fishermen's story to sell his own. But the book does tell a beautiful story of the grace and mercy of God. However you take Mr. Kissack's personal intentions, I don't think you will have a problem becoming engrossed in the story.
In order to comply with new Federal Trade Commission regulations, please note that this book was provided compliments of the Blogging for Books program.
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Review 18 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5

Inspiring True Story

Date:July 26, 2012
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clariail
Location:Mobile, AL
Age:55-65
Gender:female
Quality: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Value: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5
When I came across this book and read the description, I could not remember hearing the story when it happened back in 2006. Apparently the story was not carried as much in the States as it was the rest of the world. The book alternates between what is happening with the fishermen and what is happening with Joe Kissack. The last few chapters at the end though deal more with Joe but it does tie back to the fishermen.
In both stories, you have those who are not believers. Joe attends church but does not have a personal relationship with God. More head knowledge than heart. One of the fishermen is a strong believer and he has brought his bible with him to go out fishing for a few days which turns into nine months. In both instances, you see how God's spirit reaches out to draw them closer to Him. In the fishermen you see how it strengthens them and gives them a focus to get through each day. This is a story not only of the miraculous rescue of the fishermen but how God works daily through our circumstances to get our attention and lead us back to Him.
The book reads very quickly and even though I enjoyed reading it, thought that it ended a little abruptly and seemed to leave you hanging just a tad. I would recommend it though and will be placing my copy in our church library.
I received this book for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this honest review.
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Review 19 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5

Fast paced drama for men

Date:July 25, 2012
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Meadow Rue
Location:Midcoast Maine
Age:35-44
Gender:female
Quality: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Value: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
3 out of 5
3 out of 5
I haven’t been fishing since following a sweet boy down a wooded path to a lake on Witchtrot Road where I lived in South Berwick during high school. And yes, we caught fish–sun fish, those spiny, razor-sharp pond dwellers that are as common in Maine as they are inedible. After an hour or two of tossing them back we walked home. End of fishing story.
So, I was intrigued when Waterbrook Press offered me a review copy of Joe Kissack’s just released memoir/survival story, “The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage.”
Not just one, but three people returning from the dead plus a changed life and saved marriage? The title made me think of the Biblical story of Jesus in a boat with his friends during the storm. Was He the fourth fisherman?
Kissack, an Atlanta screenwriter and film and television executive, tells a face-paced, easy to digest tale of his own face-paced, easy-to-digest life. A beautiful wife. A mini mansion. A sports car. An invitation to walk the Red Carpet. Kissack was living the American dream while also heavily drinking and popping pills to deal with the stress.
At the same time, five Mexican men set out in a small open boat without supplies for what was to be a short fishing trip. Roll the music for “Giligan’s Island.” A storm came up. They ran out of gas and got swept out to sea.
Using alternating chapters, Kissack interweaves his own struggle with the story of these fishermen, eventually turning to the Bible–as did they–to survive. The book is fast, inspiring, and a reminder that whether we set out with little or much in our earthly adventure, it is where we place our hope that ultimately matters.
One element I found missing in Kissack’s memoir was the tangible presence of his wife, Carmen. It’s hard to respect the privacy of those we love–and have hurt–while revealing the darkest moments of our lives. But somehow, Carmen came out as a one-dimensional shadow rather than a three-dimensional person with feelings, hopes, and dreams that I wanted to know about. Because of that, this book may appeal more to men than women. As for who is that fourth fisherman, you’ll have to read the end of the story to find out.
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Review 20 for The Fourth Fisherman: How Three Mexican Fishermen Who Came Back from the Dead Changed My Life and Saved My Marriage
Overall Rating: 
5 out of 5
5 out of 5

amazing stories of God's rescuing grace

Date:July 19, 2012
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Janet Albertson
Location:Johnstown, CO
Age:45-54
Gender:female
Quality: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Value: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
Meets Expectations: 
4 out of 5
4 out of 5
The Fourth Fisherman by Joe Kissack
I found this book hard to get into at first because every other chapter bounces between an autobiography of Joe Kissack and the adventure of five Mexican fishermen lost at sea in 2005. Their lives and stories do intersect later on in the book, and there is a purpose for the way the book was written.
Joe Kissack starts telling his story recalling his success of being executive vice president at a major television studio. That was in 1997. He was living high, yet deep inside he was dying by inches. He could never achieve enough to satisfy the little boy in him who wanted desperately to please his father. He was married to a wonderful woman and had two beautiful children, but the rat race to attain more was pulling him into alcohol addiction, and later drug addictions. His life spiraled into darkness and failures. Thankfully, he had a friend who told him that God was the only answer for him. His life began to turn around after he yielded it to Him, and God gave him a new purpose for living. Part of that purpose was to tell the story of the fishermen lost at sea after a terrific storm.
There were five fishermen, at first, but because of the storm, and the owner’s insistence that they try to find his expensive net which was lost in the storm, they ran out of fuel and had no means of navigation. There was no one to rescue them, or to notice that they were not returning. Three of them learned to live by drinking the blood of the raw turtles they caught and ate; two eventually died of malnutrition and thirst. One thing of value they had not lost was a Bible, which they read daily. They prayed and read that Bible to keep up their courage. Day after day and month after month passed before they were rescued near Australia nine months later. Their families had given them up for dead, except for one praying Grandma.
When Joe first heard about the rescue, he became intrigued with their story, especially the report that the Bible had sustained them. He knew about being lost, and found, and knew what a lifeline God’s Word was in his life. He felt an inner urging to learn and tell their story, to give hope to all who would hear. The Mexican media was saying they were drug runners and cannibals, as those stories sell better. Joe couldn’t rest until he got the true story to share with the world.
This book reveals the emptiness of success, money, and acclaim. Only God can fill the hole inside of each one of us. It also shows how important loving, accepting parenting is to children. The power of prayer and the Bible is displayed in the miracles that took place in the lives of Joe and the fishermen.
Waterbrook Multnomah Publishers provided me with a complimentary copy of this book for review purposes.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the Blogging for Books program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
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